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Repairing screws out of GRP inner


mprcomp
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We have a few screws that have came out. The first are the 4 holding in the table holders in the wardrobe I think seller musn't haven't put table back properly I picked it up should have checked and it's pulled screws out of GRP so I need to fix that.

 

There is also one that has came out of a blind. Now since it's internal GRP you can't just put screw in as no wood to hold the screw.

 

I am just wondering should I put some sealant in the wholes of some sort. Then add some no nails to back of fixing insert screws and push against no nails to bond it to a large part of the wall itself? 

 

Any other suggestions? My only worry about idea above is if the no nails holds and table pulls too hard and damages more of the inner GRP.


Any ideas?

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Don’t know if it would work, or if I would be brave enough to try, but maybe some hollow wall plugs in the hole, with the screw into that. 
May have to enlarge the existing hole to fit wall plug, and may need longer screws. Not for faint hearted 

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The easy way to re-fix screws in fibreglass is to simply use an epoxy resin glue.

The drawback is that the screw will never again come out without doing even more damage.

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5 minutes ago, Stevan said:

The easy way to re-fix screws in fibreglass is to simply use an epoxy resin glue.

The drawback is that the screw will never again come out without doing even more damage.

 

I don't mind it coming out but if it damages a large part of the GRP inner might be expensive to fix. Will the No nails not do a job on the back of the plastic to bond the two pieces together?

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Sounds like a job for ... Cavity Wall Nuts!

I used these to anchor my rear light cluster onto the outside of the van. 

Fantastic! (no connection to company).

 

s-l500.jpg

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Just now, NobbyTucker said:

Sounds like a job for ... Cavity Wall Nuts!

I used these to anchor my rear light cluster onto the outside of the van. 

Fantastic! (no connection to company).

 

s-l500.jpg

Would that not mean taking a small hole and making a bug whole ot get those on the other side to accept the screw?

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14 minutes ago, mprcomp said:

Would that not mean taking a small hole and making a bug whole ot get those on the other side to accept the screw?

They push in as far as the stop (with the nut on the inside if that makes sense) then as you turn the bolt it compacts the rubber in the cavity and holds tight.

s-l1600.jpg

Edited by NobbyTucker
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Also known as well nuts....widely used on Bailey Rangers....use with stainless steel screws..

Edited by gtepete
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Thanks gepete but this isn't a range it's a newer model so it's all GRP internal not lie the rangers that had internal wood board to use.

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17 minutes ago, mprcomp said:

Thanks gepete but this isn't a range it's a newer model so it's all GRP internal not lie the rangers that had internal wood board to use.

Cavity wall fixings will also work on grp. You do have to be sure though that there is enough depth to take the full length of the screw.

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Looking at the recent videos of Bailey caravan construction batons should be built into the wall when the panel is manufactured for this type of fixing. Cavity type fixings shouldn’t be needed.

 

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Matchsticks inside the hole usually gives the screws enough grip to tighten up

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I've successfully used a tiny amount of Milliput (epoxy resin putty) to fill such holes in the caravan (for blinds fixings on my Bailey).  When fully hard (24 hours later), another pilot hole can then be made for the screw to bite into (or use the self-cutting screw Bailey fit them with, very carefully) .

 

I'd be wary of the well nuts depth for screw thread (as well as the fact they'll stand-off some items further than the original fix).

 

Milliput has 1001 uses.  It has been forming a repair to the discoloured and broken plastic handle  of my AL-KO jockey wheel clamp  for 3-4 years now.

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HI

You'll find that bailey put little metal plates under the GRP strategically - where a strong screw fix is required e.g. furniture / blinds etc.  I think all you need are screws slightly wider than the originals and not any longer!  Also use stainless steel to avoid condensation rust!  Quick trip to your local ironmonger will give you options?

Take care not to go through the outer wall!

 

 

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2 hours ago, djadria said:

You'll find that bailey put little metal plates under the GRP strategically

I think they don't or they are inadequate for the purpose (too thin, not fixed properly, or in the wrong location).  As otherwise they wouldn't pull out of the wall and have stripped thread on the grp and any such "metal"!  {At least on my caravan}.

 

Edited by Rodders53
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For holding window blinds in place I was advised here to use stick a piece of double sided tape or pad over the hole.

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3 hours ago, djadria said:

HI

You'll find that bailey put little metal plates under the GRP strategically - where a strong screw fix is required e.g. furniture / blinds etc.  I think all you need are screws slightly wider than the originals and not any longer!  Also use stainless steel to avoid condensation rust!  Quick trip to your local ironmonger will give you options?

Take care not to go through the outer wall!

 

 

Our local ironmongers has a door. We always use that. Sorry, couldn't resist........ 

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Rodders I beg to differ - if u watch the Bailey factory tour you will see them strategically placing the metal plates? I don’t think a 1-2 mm sheet of GRP and self tapping screws would hold anything up! 🙂👍

Edited by djadria
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3.45 m - I rest my case - metal plates seen at each blind fitting point at corner of windows 👍 (as well as other high load bearing areas) - for the doubters amongst you 😉👍

Edited by djadria
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18 hours ago, djadria said:


3.45 m - I rest my case - metal plates seen at each blind fitting point at corner of windows 👍 (as well as other high load bearing areas) - for the doubters amongst you 😉👍

I have no doubt they are not fit for purpose  😉👍

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1 hour ago, Rodders53 said:

I have no doubt they are not fit for purpose  😉👍

 

If they are that poor the forum would be full of complaints from other owners, and it isn’t. Which tends to negate your statement. 

 

(which I am surprised hasn’t been removed by the mods as it could be considered libellous in its criticism of a certain manufacturer and contrary to site T&C’s) 

Experience is something you acquire after you have an urgent need for it.

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18 minutes ago, Mr Plodd said:

 

If they are that poor the forum would be full of complaints from other owners, and it isn’t. Which tends to negate your statement. 

 

(which I am surprised hasn’t been removed by the mods as it could be considered libellous in its criticism of a certain manufacturer and contrary to site T&C’s) 

Plenty of threads complaining the screw have pulled out including this one.  I've repaired a far few without complaining though.

IF the fixings were 100% fit for purpose there'd be no failures like I've encountered, or the OP of this thread and others.

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2 hours ago, Rodders53 said:

I have no doubt they are not fit for purpose  😉👍

I would think they are fit for their intended purpose, but the intended purpose wouldn't include abuse of a fitting, as in the suggestion with the table fitting, nor potential incorrect tightening torque when being assembled in the first place, which has never been heard of in caravans 🙄 or subsequently at service by a dealer, or by an owner tightening up a screw that shouldn't have become loose in the first place, but did

 

They appear to work OK in many thousands of caravans and multiply this by the number of screws/ plates per van, a vast number, without problems, when used for their intended design purpose, ergo. they must be fit for purpose.

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29 minutes ago, Silversurf said:

I would think they are fit for their intended purpose, but the intended purpose wouldn't include abuse of a fitting, as in the suggestion with the table fitting, nor potential incorrect tightening torque when being assembled in the first place, which has never been heard of in caravans 🙄 

https://www.primaleisure.com/product/1410006 nor the fact they use long screws where they are fixing a blind to a wall that really only needs ones much, much shorter.  (NB those exact screws are the ones that fail(ed) to hold my blinds in place).

 

Might be assembler error but I'd say poor design, at best (especially as the long screw at the bottom of a sloping front window makes it hard to get the screw at right angles to the wall panel).

 

 

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On 31/01/2021 at 17:46, Dobloseven said:

Our local ironmongers has a door. We always use that. Sorry, couldn't resist........ 

no failure on mine - all secure - and I check them on PDI 

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