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International Driving Permit - not required for France


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According to the French Embassy this is the latest news on International Driving Permits for France:

From British Embassy in France re driving licences.
We are pleased to share some updates on driving licences, a topic that we know is causing some frustration and anxiety.
➡️ First and foremost, we want to reassure everyone that the French authorities have no intention of suddenly ceasing to recognise UK licences. In fact, it has recently been confirmed that UK licences will be recognised for one year from 1 January 2021. Details of the future exchange process beyond this date are still being decided. Before 31 December 2020, Brits who are resident in France for at least 185 days per year can apply to exchange their UK licence using the ANTS online platform if they wish to do so. For more information, please refer to the Living in France Guide (https://www.gov.uk/livinginfrance).
➡️ There is also good news for people who plan to visit France after the end of the Transition Period – UK licences will be recognised without any additional documentation.There is also good news for people who plan to visit France after the end of the Transition Period – UK licences will be recognised without any additional documentation. That means that there is no requirement for an International Driving Permit. You should, however, carry proof of insurance with you, which can be obtained from your provider.
We know that some of you who have previously applied to exchange your licence have experienced delays. A high volume of applications in 2019 caused a significant backlog in the French system. Although they have updated their processes there are still unfortunately some cases that are taking a bit longer to process and we are working with CERT to resolve urgent cases that we are aware of. We are not in a position to provide answers to individual cases but do contact us though our webform (https://www.contact-embassy.service.gov.uk/?country=France&post=British%20Embassy%20Paris) in urgent situations, e.g., if your UK licence and attestation have expired and you are unable to contact CERT.
CONTACT-EMBASSY.SERVICE.GOV.UK
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Hear endeth  another brexit gloom and doom myth ?  

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49 minutes ago, Alan Stanley said:

Hear endeth  another brexit gloom and doom myth ?  

And how long before they add, "And stay as long as you wish" ;)

Edited by Jaydug
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49 minutes ago, Jaydug said:

And how long before they add, "And stay as long as you wish" ;)

A couple of Spanish forums have reported that Spain will not enforce the 90 day rule.

 

Ian

 

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7 minutes ago, IanV8 said:

A couple of Spanish forums have reported that Spain will not enforce the 90 day rule.

 

Ian

 

 

I find that difficult to believe. As a Schengen country, Spain would surely have to abide by rules that apply across the board for all member states.

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40 minutes ago, IanV8 said:

A couple of Spanish forums have reported that Spain will not enforce the 90 day rule.

 

Ian

 

Spain already has a 90 day rule which is not enforced. Many Brits have been over-staying "under the radar" for years.  However, once we are forced, under ETIAS. to join the visa waiver scheme (late in 2022) the 90 day rule will apply to the whole of Schengen. Entry to and exit from Schengen will be automatically registered and penalties will apply.

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3 hours ago, Flying Grandad said:

Spain already has a 90 day rule which is not enforced. Many Brits have been over-staying "under the radar" for years.  However, once we are forced, under ETIAS. to join the visa waiver scheme (late in 2022) the 90 day rule will apply to the whole of Schengen. Entry to and exit from Schengen will be automatically registered and penalties will apply.

How can that be? We have been part of the EU and therefore the Shengen rules did not apply to us.  

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56 minutes ago, ivan leslie said:

How can that be? We have been part of the EU and therefore the Shengen rules did not apply to us.  

 

UK has never been part of Schengen - if it were you wouldn't need a passport to get from the UK into mainland EU and vice versa. Schengen allows EU citizens to cross all borders in mainland Europe within the EU but you live outside mainland EU - like what we do - you need a passport to get into it but can then travel where you wish within the Schengen zone.

 

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Not thought about brexit for months now. Done deal, I’ll be very surprised if a last minute deal does not surface amongst smiling politicians wanting a pat on the back for achieving what should have taken a couple of hours and a handshake a year ago.  

 

That will of course require a massive new HQ and staff so yet more jobs for the boys in Brussels.  The likes of the internet, Amazon and the massive flow of cash and holiday makers has made the E U an irrelevance in real terms.  Public opinion will not allow it any other way now. 

 

We shall see quite soon, but my Union Jack ( and I don’t care if calling it that offends).  Is ready to be run up the pole at midnight 31/12/2020.  God help any politician that I see handing our sovereignty decisions into the hands of a foreign power from then on. 

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The 90 day rule for a citizen of one EU country to stay in another EU country before having to apply for residency has always existed along with a rule that a vehicle that stays more than 6 months in another EU country needs to be registered & insured in that country but for uk caravanners & motorhomers stopping out in mainland EU for longer than that the rule has been unenforceable so not enforced. Much the same for second home owners from uk used to coming & going as they like.

 

Hopefully next year & year after  nothing will change as the visa waver thing will not happen until late 2022 & then it might well unless some sort of alternative arrangement as part of the eventual trade deal is arrived at.

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There are already plans afoot to close the door on so many of these loopholes.  Many things will look very different in the next two years.

Edited by YorkshireLhasa
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6 hours ago, Lutz said:

 

I find that difficult to believe. As a Schengen country, Spain would surely have to abide by rules that apply across the board for all member states.

When have any of the countries in the EU/Schengen, ever bided by any rules.  The only rule they give out is what you can and cannot do, then ignore the "cannot do" bits

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I reckon there will be a lot of hot air expended, and nothing much (visitor/visa wise) will change. 

 

 

Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

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Since retirement we have always been used to going out around May. Stopping down in southern France & Spain until Sept/early Oct. We have never really planned anything beyond getting an ACSI card & just booking a ferry from Dover a few days before going then booking a return a few days before we decide to come home.

 

Over winter we would do several day trips not just for shopping but to enjoy a bit of French atmosphere & some dinner.

 

I loved the way we could travel out & back with no fuss & hardly a passport inspection. So pardon me for being gutted all that has to change.

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1 hour ago, Babstreefern said:

When have any of the countries in the EU/Schengen, ever bided by any rules.  The only rule they give out is what you can and cannot do, then ignore the "cannot do" bits

 

Schengen and EU are different kettle of fish. There are EU countries that are not members of Schengen and non-EU states which do belong to the Schengen group.

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15 hours ago, Lutz said:

 

Schengen and EU are different kettle of fish.

 

Whether it's Schengen countries or EU countries writing the rule book, it probably won't make any difference.      If any country doesn't like a particular rule, they'll break it - and who will care?   Nobody, it seems.   See this European Commission chart of rule breakers for 2016.

 

1430559494_Rulebreakers.png.fe97184563fe6525b1c7721f38e566c3.png

 

Edited by Jaydug
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That is a list of the cases (well over 1000) which have been escalated to the status of "violation". I wonder what the true number of contraventions would be :D.

Ern

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If a country can be in the EU & break whatever rules they like it makes you wonder why we left. We could have gone with the good bits like free trade & free movement. Our free movement that is & just ignored the the rest of the rules. For example we could have discouraged Eastern European migrants the way Holland does by having strict labour laws & enforcing them making it less viable for companies to hire foreign staff cheaply. I wonder why we didn’t think of that.

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1 hour ago, Laurent said:

 For example we could have discouraged Eastern European migrants the way Holland does by having strict labour laws & enforcing them making it less viable for companies to hire foreign staff cheaply. I wonder why we didn’t think of that.

 

Our Judges and their “interpretation” of the European Courts rulings in regards to “Yuman Rights”  That’s why we cannot currently deport hundreds of “foreign” criminals.

Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

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4 hours ago, Laurent said:

If a country can be in the EU & break whatever rules they like it makes you wonder why we left. We could have gone with the good bits like free trade & free movement. Our free movement that is & just ignored the the rest of the rules. For example we could have discouraged Eastern European migrants the way Holland does by having strict labour laws & enforcing them making it less viable for companies to hire foreign staff cheaply. I wonder why we didn’t think of that.

Since Eastern Europeans tend to be hard-working tax paying people, many of whom did the jobs that Brits consider themselves too good to do, why would be foolish enough to close the doors on them?  How interesting it will be for all the Brits to find the European doors now closed on them working and living overseas.

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The main issue with Eastern European migrant labour was uk firms bringing them in to work in exploitative business models & being permitted & encouraged by UK governments to do so.. The myth was promoted that UK workers were too lazy to do these jobs when in fact UK workers would not have put up with the exploitative work practices required to boost profits say in soft fruit production. To do this work people were brought in by labour agencies based in those countries ie people exploiting their own countrymen for profit.

 

Also many other migrants were/are being exploited working in car washes also run by their own people. Do you see similar roadside car washes in France? No because they would not be allowed to exist.

 

It was successive UK governments allowing the exploitation of migrant labour by greedy UK companies with no thought to the social problems large influxes of migrant labour into rural parts of the UK would cause that resulted in the brexit vote.

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Laurent, there is migrant labour for seasonal fruit picking in France just as there is in England.  Go see the grape harvest. Those workers are not being exploited, they are earning money.   

In fact it happens all over the world. My son picked apples in New Zealand with a multi national crew when he was on his travels. He wasn't being exploited either.

Please don't knock migrant workers. 

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On 01/12/2020 at 18:34, YorkshireLhasa said:

My friend and I had hoped to spend 4 to 6 months travelling through Europe to Italy - in total five countries.  We knew that we an American, he would come up against issues but actually as a Brit, I am coming up against more than he is.  Every European country is requiring permissions, health insurance have to be found, proof of income or sufficient savings ..... The list goes on.

Nothing new here then ?...Really ?....Do we not already require permission (it's called a passport !)....And would anyone really travel abroad without insurance ?...( Regarding income ? Savings etc ?....I'd simply refuse these details as not relevant as I am traveling not intending to remain there ! )....

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1 minute ago, PeterR said:

.And would anyone really travel abroad without insurance ?..

 

Yes!!!!   Some members on this forum argue that travel insurance is unnecessary.   They insist that their EHIC is all that's required. :)

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Oh for god’s sake read my post again.  Where does it knock migrant labour? What it does do is knock successive governments for allowing UK companies to exploit migrant labour instead of ensuring a level playing field where local & migrant labour were treated equally. 
 

This tipped the balance over into the leave vote majority. Just saying like...

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