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I need a new drill for the caravan steadies.


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22 hours ago, daveat92 said:

Parkside Tools are available online from eBay and others. You don't have to wait for Aldi/Lidl to get them in.

Not at the sensible Lidl prices.  Aldi don't sell Parkside but another 'own' brand.  I looked due to this thread and was very shocked at the prices some like to charge.  The 12V one in store soon was on offer at £80 less 1p as a kit with drill, battery and charger!

 

https://www.lidl.co.uk/en/c/diy/c1698/w2?ar=3 only has a 12V bare plus battery/charger from Parkside.  This is the latest incarnation of the one I use, although chunkier due to the rubber moulding / grips.    A Black n Decker 18V hammer drill is the only other one.

 

NB Lidl (at least used to) sell extra batteries at a 'steal', delivered, from Germany.  Sometimes also available in stores?

 

Edited by Rodders53

2012 Bailey Pegasus 2 Rimini towed by 2019 Ford Galaxy Titanium X, 2.0 EcoBlue, 8 speed auto.

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No sorry. Out of chatter comes entertainment and the occasional gem of information so this thread is serving two useful purposes, besides, you don't have to read it.

The OP Paul, has had a lot of helpful informed replies , so should be able to make an informed choice to what to buy.....thats all I am saying....How many more years do you want this this thread to co

It’s not about saving minutes for me, arthritis in my elbows, shoulders, back and legs prevents me from bending over for any length of time, also I cannot hold and turn the manual brace.   W

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I bought a Ryobi back in 2006 mainly for the mover so obviously copes with the steadies, only on 2nd set of batteries, I have 2.

 

Before I chose it I wound the mover on fully with the brace, did a torque check, doubled the resulting reading for 'a bit up my sleeve' and chose a Ryobi to suit.

 

As I say, primarily for our mover.

 

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Stay safe - Griff.  :ph34r:

Wheels at the front - Discovery 4. Wheels at the back - Bessacarr 845.

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We use a Stanley Fat Max and it has done the job very well and has two batteries. Never tried it on the mover though but I doubt it would work on ours but can see the advantage on a wind up model.

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I had refrained from replacing my old (1964)  Wolf Corded Drill for a very very very long time - Why ? - because there was nothing wrong with it and it did have a 1/2" capacity chuck.

I had since relented (21/2/20) and bought a BAUKER Cordless Combi Drill (18v13mm) from Tool Station model no CD1218W1.

 

The drill came with 2 batteries and a charger all for the princely sum of £49.98,it is a nicely balanced tool at 1.744kgs and would be easily handled by the smaller hands of a female.

I comes with a detachable belt clip.

 

I consider the purchase of this tool one of the best investments that I have ever made in avery very long time.

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Life in general can be a journey of chance with some winners and sadly some losers. Your outfit can never be left to chance. A short-while carrying out essential checks can ensure a long-time of happy & safe caravanning for all concerned.
Ignorance can often be bliss but is certainly not an excuse and when continually disregarded they can be totally disastrous for oneself and the innocent parties.

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I agree with Babstreefern on this, its manual for me all the way and at 65 I can still whizz the crank handle around with one hand almost as fast as a drill anyway. I do this by holding the crank at the first bend in front of the swivel.  Admittedly this may be down to half a lifetime spent using large spanners, who can tell?

I  appreciate that a lot of people for whatever reason do struggle with the handle and need the assistance of a drill and good luck to them if it removes the strain.

But as for the young and fit, unless changing sites a lot more than is usual it seems a bit gimmicky to me.

Of course this is only my personal opinion but can't help but shake my head when I see someone getting their drill out:rolleyes:

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19 minutes ago, robertB said:

I agree with Babstreefern on this, its manual for me all the way and at 65 I can still whizz the crank handle around with one hand almost as fast as a drill anyway. I do this by holding the crank at the first bend in front of the swivel.  Admittedly this may be down to half a lifetime spent using large spanners, who can tell?

I  appreciate that a lot of people for whatever reason do struggle with the handle and need the assistance of a drill and good luck to them if it removes the strain.

But as for the young and fit, unless changing sites a lot more than is usual it seems a bit gimmicky to me.

Of course this is only my personal opinion but can't help but shake my head when I see someone getting their drill out:rolleyes:

I was with you for long enough on this always feeling quite able to manage with a manual crank. But I had a cordless drill sat at home in the garage anyway whist we were away in the van, and for the cost of a suitable drill bit I thought why not?

Have to say it is a lot quicker and easier with the drill although I still carry the manual crank just in case.

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Life is not a rehearsal . . .:)

Porsche Cayenne S Diesel & Knaus StarClass 695. Previously Audi S4 Avant & Elddis Super Sirocco

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My Other Half does all the winding and enjoys it and refuses to let me use the drill.  She and the rest of her family call it lullaluming from her childhood!

Sam :beardy:   RR Sport HSE Dynamic towing Swift Elegance Grande 845

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Bought one last night from B&Q black and decker 18 v £30.00 at that price if i get 2/3 years out of it great only one battery no case but good enough for the steadies 

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now retired and loving it

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15 hours ago, Babstreefern said:

I have saved £££s not getting a drill for the steadies.  I use the manual type, which you turn round and round.  No battery recharging necessary.  Just muscle work:D.  At the end of the day, how many minutes are you really saving?

 

 

Ah! But after twenty years how many hours have you saved?;)

 

Anyway, you won't last long using all that muscle work. Things wear out the more you use them. Muscles are only good for so many contractions and by using a winding handle you are eating into your allowence. :)

 

No need to thank me, it is my pleasure to help you live longer.

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5 hours ago, mickfishing said:

Bought one last night from B&Q black and decker 18 v £30.00 at that price if i get 2/3 years out of it great only one battery no case but good enough for the steadies 

 

Just now, AWanderingLancastrian said:

 

Hi Mick - Give us a clue !!! and who were you responding to ?

Life in general can be a journey of chance with some winners and sadly some losers. Your outfit can never be left to chance. A short-while carrying out essential checks can ensure a long-time of happy & safe caravanning for all concerned.
Ignorance can often be bliss but is certainly not an excuse and when continually disregarded they can be totally disastrous for oneself and the innocent parties.

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On 18/11/2020 at 18:15, fred said:

I used to have a Bosch cordless, when the battery gave up the ghost it was cheaper to buy a drill from Aldi with 2 batteries, than a replacement Bosch battery.   Bit of a no brainier tbh.  

This is a common problem, &  I'm sure it's done deliberately. I have an Aldi 18V drill (with jig saw & light & grinder; cost £45 about 9 years ago!) with failing batteries. With a bit of judicious guesswork I got a (similar) replacement battery off e-bay for £18.50 (latest tech!). This not only works better but lasts longer. The only problem is that the terminals are reversed (easily overcome) & it has to be secured with gaffa tape as the attachment clips don't match-up LOL.

Beats spending £100's...........I'm proud to say that I'm not only tight but despise waste!

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3L auto Nissan Terrano, 2004 & Swift Elegance 530, 2018. As Leonardo da Vinci once said: 'If you find from your own experience that something is a fact & it contradicts what some authority has written down, then you must abandon the authority & base your reasoning on your own findings' ie: use your common sense!

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On 20/11/2020 at 20:15, AWanderingLancastrian said:

 

Hi Mick - Give us a clue !!! and who were you responding to ?

Responding to the post about battery drills 

 

now retired and loving it

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On 18/11/2020 at 18:22, gtepete said:

Ditto, I have a Dewalt one, but also use it for wheel nuts etc,,,

Correction, mine is a impact driver not a drill, ...hence can be be used for wheel nuts.. 

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1 hour ago, gtepete said:

Correction, mine is a impact driver not a drill, ...hence can be be used for wheel nuts.. 

image.png

 

You don’t need an impact driver for wheel nuts, just a drill with a decent bit of torque! 

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Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

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53 minutes ago, Mr Plodd said:

 

You don’t need an impact driver for wheel nuts, just a drill with a decent bit of torque! 

 

Lol, I experimented once with my first Makita impact driver, reasoning being it's smaller and lighter than the drill.

Never again, the leg came down an awful lot quicker than expected and looked like it was trying it's best  to launch the van over the fence!

No way I'd risk that again.

My wife  usually does the legs and prefers the winder so we don't bother with a drill, the batteries are handy for the Makita cordless vac though, which is powerful and pretty cheap.

When the time comes that we can't physically manage by hand I wouldn't hesitate to use the drill, I've got my dad's old winder socket with extension biding it's time in the garage.

 

Hymer 545 Luxusline hauled by Audi SQ5 plus.

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On 19/11/2020 at 23:19, Babstreefern said:

I have saved £££s not getting a drill for the steadies.  I use the manual type, which you turn round and round.  No battery recharging necessary.  Just muscle work:D.  At the end of the day, how many minutes are you really saving?

I went through the phase of using an electric drill for a couple of years some time ago and decided that it was more trouble than it was worth. My wife now uses a 60 year or so  old carpenters brace which I keep well oiled, it works well and has never let us down.

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16 hours ago, Mr Plodd said:

 

You don’t need an impact driver for wheel nuts, just a drill with a decent bit of torque! 

 

 

Thats is DANGEROUS unless you can determine the Nm torque. Its all very well to use a drill for the wheel nuts but you MUST use a torque wrench for the final tighten. Just thought I would mention that.

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The force applied to the underside of the caravan through the corner steady is not constant because the gearing of the corner steady is not constant, so trying to control the force by experimenting with torque input (drill torque) is impossible. This means the drill must have the clutch set very low to avoid damaging the caravan. So when you have been round 4 corners with a drill, you need to go round again with the winding brace so that you can "feel" the force. Its simpler to use the winding brace in my opinion.

I used to take the drill and was pleased with the speed at which I could pitch the caravan. Then I realised one day that I wasnt actually in a hurry, that the drill had to be charged and carted about, that the excersize of bending the back and winding steadies is actually good for me, that the huge torque which can too easily be applied to the corner steady can be enough to destroy the caravan floor/body. I think using the winding brace supplied is ok.

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Ern

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On 20/11/2020 at 06:38, GaryB1969 said:


When it’s chucking down with rain a drill is priceless!

Plus it helps the other half, with this task...

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I'd never use an impact driver for the steadies.  The 20V Parkside one I have is too 'uncontrollable'. 

Great for their intended purpose though.  Mine undid a screw on a panel that I'd been unable to by hand or any other power tool.  It will drive in screws into materials (e.g. wood) that a normal drill-driver just mashes the head.  Similarly it undid bolts in a rotting swing frame with ease.

So undoing wheel nuts - when they are 'too tight' - would be fine but not doing them up, IMV.

 

As for normal drill drivers applying "huge torque to damage the floor" one would have to have, literally, absolutely zero mechanical sympathy to do that!  

I tend to ease off the variable speed trigger (i.e. go slower) when the pads are about to reach the floor (or steadies near the 'fully up') and - with my baby 12V unit - it squeals (electronic speed control) and stalls at such low speed, so I can, effectively, feel by hand how firm they are.

 

Often use the hand brace a day later, when the van settles into the ground, though.  :D

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2012 Bailey Pegasus 2 Rimini towed by 2019 Ford Galaxy Titanium X, 2.0 EcoBlue, 8 speed auto.

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Given the relatively small leverage provided by the handle of the average cordless drill, I cannot see how you can apply excessive torque.  My cordless drill has a handle giving a lever of  about 6" whereas my torque wrench is about 2' long.  I do not think that my wrist is strong enough to provide too much torque on a 6" lever.

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15 minutes ago, DACS said:

Given the relatively small leverage provided by the handle of the average cordless drill, I cannot see how you can apply excessive torque.  My cordless drill has a handle giving a lever of  about 6" whereas my torque wrench is about 2' long.  I do not think that my wrist is strong enough to provide too much torque on a 6" lever.

 

I have managed to snap more than the odd screw with my De Walt drill/driver! Mainly because of the gearing involved increases torque at the bit end compared to that felt at the handle. 

 

But I do wind the torque setting right down when using it to crank the steadies down. Like many things in life it’s down to personal choice. I use a drill for the steadies, and I am happy to do so as I appreciate the forces involved, others are not happy to do the same, that’s not to say either view is right or wrong. 

 

Marmite anybody? ;)

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Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

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My drill, a Worx, has 24 torque settings, 2 underlying geared speed settings plus variable speed control via the trigger.

If I end up doing damage when winding my steadies I reckon I've only myself to blame.

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Life is not a rehearsal . . .:)

Porsche Cayenne S Diesel & Knaus StarClass 695. Previously Audi S4 Avant & Elddis Super Sirocco

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2 minutes ago, gtepete said:

Hopefully the OP has all the info he needs.....close thread?

Why?????

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