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I’m with Andy 100 % on this one. Best tyres to the front. They do all the work. I rotate my tyres front to back every few thousand miles while I’ve got the wheels off to clean them and check the brakes. This way they all get changed at the same time invariably with whatever tyres were fitted by the manufacturer as OE. Worth making the point that if you drive a 4x4 certain manufacturers ( notably BMW) recommend no more than 10% difference in tread depth front to rear to avoid damaging the transmission. Expensive if you get an irrepairable puncture on one of a set of 1/2 worn tyres....

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I am very well aware of weight transference under heavy braking (and could bore you with the maths);. I was involved in the forensic investigation, and reconstruction of serious and fatal road traffic

No need at all for anything other than standard tyres on the rear when towing.    Think about it, most cars have a tow hitch limit if 75-100kg, the weight of a single (albeit chunky) passeng

Personally I drive at speeds where under/oversteer is highly unlikely to happen !   If you get into a situation where either is likely to happen then you have failed spectacularly to assess

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23 minutes ago, Dobloseven said:

Not too sure about  rear brakes not wearing out as often as the fronts. Admittedly with front discs and rear drums on a FWD vehicle, the rears seemed to last for ever. But with discs all round, the rears don't seem to last much longer than the fronts. Last few times I've done them on our vehicles, I've changed them all,pads and discs, while I've got the tools out,and in the mood. Regarding ESP and DSC, the OP talks of a Meriva, which is very much from the GM back catalogue, so I'm not too sure whether it would have such delights. Could be wrong on that one though. 

Oi the meriva isn't that old or unmodern! 😂 It's got ESP. 

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16 minutes ago, Tuningdrew said:

I’m with Andy 100 % on this one. Best tyres to the front. They do all the work. I rotate my tyres front to back every few thousand miles while I’ve got the wheels off to clean them and check the brakes. This way they all get changed at the same time invariably with whatever tyres were fitted by the manufacturer as OE. Worth making the point that if you drive a 4x4 certain manufacturers ( notably BMW) recommend no more than 10% difference in tread depth front to rear to avoid damaging the transmission. Expensive if you get an irrepairable puncture on one of a set of 1/2 worn tyres....

Agree up to a point on OE tyres. The Nexens on our Korando were still going strong at 37000 miles with no concerns. I change them front to rear every 12000 miles and think we'd have got another change out of them, but we had the wheels changed under warranty and thought we might as well have 4 new tyres, as the fitting, valves and balancing were being paid for by Ssangyong. Went for Crossclimate SUVs  and they improved the ride somewhat, both solo and towing. They were quite a bit dearer though. I've recently changed them front to back and they seem to be wearing OK. Would cetainly recommend them, though apparently the Goodyear Vector something or others are very good too for all season tyres. 

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I really cannot recall when I last changed rear brake pads, fronts certainly but rears? Nah

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Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

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At this year's not my 2007  cmax got it's first advisory.  The rear pads are wearing thin.  Not bad for the first work needed  from new on the brakes.

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Regarding front or rear for new tyres, I remember a Toyota Corolla we had and at mot time the  tester said that while he couldn't fàil the rear tyres which had plenty of tread left he really would advise changing them at eleven years old.  I realised that the car had had a full set of new ones on when we got it and the fronts had been chànged twice. Now any new tyres go on the rear.

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Am I the only person who swaps wheels front/back every so often to even out wear.? Means I always have tyres with similar wear and grip on both ends, and only ever change all 4 together, so I'm never running mismatched tyres.

 

And some 4wd cars are reputedly very sensitive to different tyre rolling diameters. Swapping front/back is part of the annual servicing requirements on some cars.

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We have winter tyres,front to back swap every 6 months then for us as i mark where they were. If you put the worst tyres on the rear you risk overseer not understeer. Learnt that the hard way. Purposely put super soft grippy tyres on the rear of my mr2 and slightly less so on front to prevent the tail swap which happened with rubbish on the back when I first bought it. ! Scarey.

 

you obviously do what you like but give me understeer any day and had both due to rubbish tyres. and of course all the motoring advice confirms this.

 

're rear pads a lot of new minis are suffering early rear pad wear,far sooner than the fronts and this is due stability and cruise control systems acting mostly on the rear a bit like alk o a tc to slow the car safely apparently so it has become more common.

 

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56 minutes ago, Jezzerb said:

 

you obviously do what you like but give me understeer any day and had both due to rubbish tyres. and of course all the motoring advice confirms this.

 

Personally I drive at speeds where under/oversteer is highly unlikely to happen !

 

If you get into a situation where either is likely to happen then you have failed spectacularly to assess the conditions ! Before anyone leaps in with the “What if there is diesel spilt on a wet road” argument the simple fact is that in that situation the amount of tyre tread is immaterial. 

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Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

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40 minutes ago, Mr Plodd said:

 

Personally I drive at speeds where under/oversteer is highly unlikely to happen !

 

If you get into a situation where either is likely to happen then you have failed spectacularly to assess the conditions ! Before anyone leaps in with the “What if there is diesel spilt on a wet road” argument the simple fact is that in that situation the amount of tyre tread is immaterial. 

Absolutely, if the whole understeer v oversteer issue becomes important on the roads it is because something has already gone spectacularly wrong! Even then, seldom is steering out of a problem safer than braking, although it can happen.

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Have had serious oversteer and understeer at times but that was back in my karting days!

 

Always had my best tyres on the front problem free and that's been for near on 50 years, seems I was doing it wrong for all that time and I need to change my thinking. :mellow:

 

 

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Stay safe - Griff.  :ph34r:

Wheels at the front - Discovery 4. Wheels at the back - Bessacarr 845.

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Have to agree with Andy that all the sensible thinking says best tyres to the front and I have always done this myself.

Can't argue with the fact that the industry says otherwise though, so you have to make your own mind up on this one.

 

20 minutes ago I had a tyre fitter on my drive fitting a new 19 inch michelin to my wife's car. I am fully aware that a nail can get you anytime but the car is 3 weeks old and has done 266 miles so I am typing this whilst grinding my teeth:angry:

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12 hours ago, Mr Plodd said:

I really cannot recall when I last changed rear brake pads, fronts certainly but rears? Nah

 

Some modern cars eat through the rear brake pads but that's mainly due to stability and traction systems.

Yeti 2.0TDi DSG 4X4 L&K, Octavia TSi Manual, Citigo ASG, Swift Challenger.

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23 minutes ago, Griff said:

Have had serious oversteer and understeer at times but that was back in my karting days!

 

Always had my best tyres on the front problem free and that's been for near on 50 years, seems I was doing it wrong for all that time and I need to change my thinking. :mellow:

 

 

Karting is a great way to learn something about over and understeer, under relatively safe conditions, a skill you hope to never need on the roads.

Skid control courses are available (Covid permitting!) and not too expensive, to better that skill. I enjoyed one and it helped my hands and feet learn what my head already knew.

OOPS! Fred drift strikes again!

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2 minutes ago, Stevan said:

Karting is a great way to learn something about over and understeer,

 

And rallying even better! :)

 

Chevette's and Impreza's my weapon of choice until costs got absolutely stupid. Still managed a couple of decades though.

Yeti 2.0TDi DSG 4X4 L&K, Octavia TSi Manual, Citigo ASG, Swift Challenger.

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49 minutes ago, logiclee said:

 

Some modern cars eat through the rear brake pads but that's mainly due to stability and traction systems.

 

Ah, hadn’t thought of that angle !! 

Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

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Costco tyre fitters are swines for only fitting your new tyres to the rear, i vaguely remember them saying that it's a policy michelin tyres adopts as they seem only to fit michelins. 

 

I have been using tyre shopper online for a good few years now, which use national tyres as their fitters, you just tell them front or rear & job done. My current car has a non popular size & tyre shopper only have a small range available so might have to shop further when the time comes

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22 hours ago, Mr Plodd said:

 

Personally I drive at speeds where under/oversteer is highly unlikely to happen !

 

If you get into a situation where either is likely to happen then you have failed spectacularly to assess the conditions ! Before anyone leaps in with the “What if there is diesel spilt on a wet road” argument the simple fact is that in that situation the amount of tyre tread is immaterial. 

Correct to a point but I braked on a corner (disaster in a rwd mr2 and that was inexperience of rwd cars with poor rears) at a speed the car in front went through with consummate ease, due to a rabbit or hare (yes I know carry on but was instinct) and the car swapped ends in an instant very neatly there  as no traffic and it rotated within the riad. I sheepishly due a 3 of them and made my way for a new pair of psnts, no damage done. Great care with tyres subsequently. I should after main dealer had also sold me the car and the rear tyres were pumped to the rev1 rate not rev2 . 7  psi difference. Lesson lesrned.

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47 minutes ago, Jezzerb said:

Correct to a point but I braked on a corner (disaster in a rwd mr2 and that was inexperience of rwd cars with poor rears) at a speed the car in front went through with consummate ease, due to a rabbit or hare (yes I know carry on but was instinct) and the car swapped ends in an instant very neatly there  as no traffic and it rotated within the riad. I sheepishly due a 3 of them and made my way for a new pair of psnts, no damage done. Great care with tyres subsequently. I should after main dealer had also sold me the car and the rear tyres were pumped to the rev1 rate not rev2 . 7  psi difference. Lesson lesrned.

If you are going to brake hard while cornering at speed it really does not matter which end of the car has the better tyres or what type of car, something bad is likely to happen, and the eventual outcome is mainly down to dumb luck!

The combination of inexperience, youthful over-confidence and the enjoyment of speed has made significant profits for funeral directors!

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I didn't brake hard-that's the point-the tyres were well underinflated and rubbish quality. Glad everyone out there is the perfect driver and never makes mistakes or gets in that situation-( rounding a bend and there's a tractor or horse and mud on the road-yes Andy is totally correct but we can all get in that position no matter how careful or experienced we are)of course we should all never corner faster than we can stop -and in the mr2 with proerly inflated tyres of better quality i could-I went back to replicate it; mind a newer car with stability control might have helped-the point i was making and is once again totally missed by some is that; all things being equal and the worst happens the best tyres can help and the best on the back is best as understeer is far more copable with than over steer for the average driver without racetrack /skid pan training. 

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3 hours ago, Jezzerb said:

I didn't brake hard-that's the point-the tyres were well underinflated and rubbish quality. Glad everyone out there is the perfect driver and never makes mistakes or gets in that situation-( rounding a bend and there's a tractor or horse and mud on the road-yes Andy is totally correct but we can all get in that position no matter how careful or experienced we are)of course we should all never corner faster than we can stop -and in the mr2 with proerly inflated tyres of better quality i could-I went back to replicate it; mind a newer car with stability control might have helped-the point i was making and is once again totally missed by some is that; all things being equal and the worst happens the best tyres can help and the best on the back is best as understeer is far more copable with than over steer for the average driver without racetrack /skid pan training. 

 

 

The biggest issue here is simply MR2. A light weight mid-engined rear wheel drive car known for it's oversteer tendency and especially lift-off oversteer.  And very difficult to correct due to it's relatively short wheel base and rear biased weight distribution.

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Yeti 2.0TDi DSG 4X4 L&K, Octavia TSi Manual, Citigo ASG, Swift Challenger.

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11 hours ago, Dave87 said:

Costco tyre fitters are swines for only fitting your new tyres to the rear, i vaguely remember them saying that it's a policy michelin tyres adopts as they seem only to fit michelins. 

I think that it is a bit unfair to call CostCo "swines" when they are following the tyre industry's recommendations.

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10 minutes ago, logiclee said:

 

 

The biggest issue here is simply MR2. A light weight mid-engined rear wheel drive car known for it's oversteer tendency and especially lift-off oversteer.  And very difficult to correct due to it's relatively short wheel base and rear biased weight distribution.

I agree with that-the rev 1 got hammered but the rev 2 had wider rears than the fronts and while not perfect by playing with tyre compounds I felt the situation almost completely cured with Bridgestone F1 s on the rear-mega soft -only lasted 8k  miles compared to Pirelli etc more ordinary rubber which always did 15k easily. I give in-the opinion on here is that it was my bad driving and I was too fast although a Corolla did the same in front of me at the same speed. Believe what you like (it never happened after the tyres were replaced and the pressures were right and the car never felt unstable-and I kept it 16years and 160k miles and drove it in ice and snow), BUT you can never ever drive and cover every eventuality and no one can guarantee they won't make a mistake-you can mitigate against it by keeping a sensible distance driving according to or within the conditions, etc but something can and will go wrong-and everything you have at your disposal in those circumstances is good-am sure we'll all agree and good tyres make a difference and the best way to do it is rotate so they are evenly worn as I always do but failing that all the research says best on the back. I can see the argument for the reverse and thought the same but reading round it says differently. Each to their own however-I never skimp on tyres check them weekly and rotate them for even wear every 6months when the winters go on. Just object to trying to make a point it being totally sidetracked onto  a critique of my driving age and the type of car.

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3 minutes ago, Jezzerb said:

But completely cured with Bridgestone F1 s on the rear-mega soft -only lasted 9k  miles compared to Pirelli etc more ordinary rubber which always did 15k easily.

 

You were fitting stickier tyres to the rear to compensate for the cars characteristics.  When I was rallying Impreza's there was a guy who used to do one day events in an MR2. I navigated for him a few times and the car took some skill to control, a lot of work for the limited power.

 

I only ever fit Premium Tyres, our last Octavia came with well regarded Nexen's that were factory fit. They lasted a week.

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Yeti 2.0TDi DSG 4X4 L&K, Octavia TSi Manual, Citigo ASG, Swift Challenger.

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Yes exactly-worked a treat-expensive though as they were about the most expensive tyres you could get and wore the fastest too! Premiums went on the front too but not so grippy! 

Was going to say something when I saw premium and nexens then read the last sentence-can't fault you-having had landsail on a golf r32-why would you , (i bought second hand) i did the same.

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