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I have a Co-ax lead next to my status unit (not connected) with a label on it saying aerial feed. Can anyone tell me what it is for?
 

Thanks

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It’s the lead that leads to your aerial!

Connect it to the socket on your status unit that says “aerial”

Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

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2 minutes ago, Mr Plodd said:

It’s the lead that leads to your aerial!

Connect it to the socket on your status unit that says “aerial”

As Mr.P and Reggie say it is the input lead from your roof mounted aerial.

 

The socket to plug it into could say aerial or more usually Ant -in.

Common sense isn't a gift, it's a punishment because you have to deal with everyone who doesn't have it.  :rolleyes:

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There is already a lead on the aerial socket and it works with my tv so it is an extra lead. The only empty socket on the status is an output for a third tv point which I don’t have.

My opinion is worth exactly what you paid for it.;)

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24 minutes ago, Stagn8 said:

There is already a lead on the aerial socket and it works with my tv so it is an extra lead. The only empty socket on the status is an output for a third tv point which I don’t have.

Does the stray lead connect to an external aerial connection point somewhere (perhaps in a locker) to facilitate connection to a pitch bollard?

 

I have such an external point on my caravan (self fitted) that swaps places with the roof aerial down lead on the Status amplifier's ‘Ant-In’ connection a bollard connection is available.

 

Alternatively by connecting it to one of the TV connections on the Status amplifier, it can feed a TV in the awning from the roof aerial.

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Aha! Good thought Reggie, the van does have an external satellite connection, though I had assumed it would just splice into the aerial lead rather than needing to be manually changed over. The specification for the van mentions it but nothing in the handbook to explain how it works, not sure if you can run a satellite signal through an amplifier, certainly no f-type sockets! 
Will have to try and chase it down tomorrow.

 

Thanks lol.

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10 hours ago, Stagn8 said:

Aha! Good thought Reggie, the van does have an external satellite connection, though I had assumed it would just splice into the aerial lead rather than needing to be manually changed over.

 

Satellite (screw connector) or terrestrial (push on connector) ? 

 

Either will do the other and there are adapters available to connect both in either direction. 

 

Do you have two inputs into your Status unit or just the one? 

Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

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I would agree with Plod except that (a) the Belling-Lee (i.e. standard TV connector) is generally not secure enough to be able to pass current to power the LNB on the sat dish, and (b) it is not rated to cover the 2000MHz+ that will be arriving from the LNB. F-type are much more secure being screwed on and were specifically designed for satellite use.

 

For satellite the procedure is to use a F-type barrel (back-to-back socket) to link the external cable from the outside to the cable going to the socket near the TV very specifically NOT through the aerial amp which will not pass d.c. and is only rated for TV/DAB/FM frequencies. Unfortunately said socket will be Belling-Lee so the socket plate will need to be changed for one with an F-type outlet (the connection on the back of the plate is also F-type.) It means that if terrestrial TV is to be used then the tail to the TV will need a F-type plug on one end and a Belling-Lee plug on the other.

 

For the record the external socket is actually designed as an outlet for a TV in the awning.

 

Buy connectors in bags of 10 from Toolstation or Screwfix and ??100 cable from the same source (i.e. CT100, NF100, PF100 or WF100 - its the 100 that matters.) There is loads of infor on line on how to fit the connectors.

 

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Thanks all for your input, a continuity check established that the lead is indeed connected to an f-type connector located in the external mains socket, Bailey describe this as a satellite input. All connections on the status amplifier are also f-type screw in (made a mistake there) , so. I guess the procedure if using a sat dish is to disconnect one of the TV output connections and make a direct connection to this ‘aerial feed’ via an in-line connector. 
So, three ways of using it, input from sat dish after making an in-line connection to the one of the vans TV points (could also use a splitter and connect both TV points) . An inlet for site TV bollard by connecting it to the Status aerial input with output to both TV points. Or, as a feed to the awning from the Status aerial if connected to the third Status TV output.

Ah well, interesting diversion for a Saturday morning but curiosity now satisfied, not planning on a sat dish for the moment so will don’t need any extra bits. Shame Bailey don’t fully update their handbooks when they introduce new things into their ranges!

Thanks again one and all.

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My opinion is worth exactly what you paid for it.;)

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Well thank you for coming back and updating the thread. So many don’t bother! 

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Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

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8 minutes ago, Stagn8 said:

input from sat dish after making an in-line connection to the one of the vans TV points (could also use a splitter and connect both TV points) . 

 

1)  You cannot split a 'normal' satellite LNB connection to two points and have them both working properly at the same time.

2) A special 'dc power pass' splitter is needed with pass on both ports if one wanted to do so with the limitations it will impose.

3) A splitter will impose significant losses on the signal by splitting (5-6dB above 1 GHz cf  4dB for UHF TV) which could need a bigger dish and more accurate alignment.

 

*  Unless a special unicable LNB, and satellite receiver capable of using it, is employed.  (Some $ky boxes and some freesat boxes can use unicable mode via special menus I believe.  Not sure if TV tuners commonly support it).  Satandpcguy will probably know for sure 

 

NB Belling Lee TV sockets and plugs are not especially good at satellite intermediate frequencies, but can work OK.  The plugs need to be soldered, have a screw on centre pin or be crimped to provide a reliable DC power connection to the LNB from the receiver.

It's usually better to install extra proper satellite cables and sockets where and if required.

 

My Rimini came with no external antenna connection points so I've installed three from the battery box to a panel behind my TV over the fire, all with F-sockets. I use an adapter F-to-Belling Lee for TV if I have to resort to a bollard TV connection (rarely). Two sat cables are for freesat PVR use.

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Thanks for the correction Rodgers 👍

Rodders!

My opinion is worth exactly what you paid for it.;)

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Could I expound upon that Rodders for the benefit of all?

The signal from the LNB to the satellite box has four forms: it can have vertical or horizontal polarity in either of two frequency bands, high and low. It is necessary to be able to select between these four combinations up one cable and is done by switching a 22KHz audio tone on and off to select the frequency band, or changing the supply voltage from a nominal 15V to a nominal18V to switch the polarity. Ergo you cannot feed two satellite boxes from one LNB down one cable. If a dual output LNB is used with two cables, one to each box, then it will work as there is effectively two independent LNBs operating.

To avoid confusion, a Sky+HD box that has recording facilities has two LNB inputs so that one can record and the other be viewed or both be recording simultaneously. If only one input is being used then single tuner operation can be selected from the engineering page by pressing 'Services 0 0 1 Select.' Do be careful what you do in this area as you can stop the thing working properly very easily. To work with one cable, under the setup menu you will find 'single feed mode.'

 

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43 minutes ago, Woodentop said:

Could I expound upon that Rodders for the benefit of all?

Of course. 

 

but juts to compound the overall confusion $ky Q uses a different method with a "wideband" LNB needing two cables: one with all the Horizontal frequencies and the second for all the Vertical frequencies.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low-noise_block_downconverter explains the lot for anyone interested.

Edited by Rodders53

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My brain hurts !!! :unsure:

Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

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