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PLEASE help with British terminology regarding weights


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12 hours ago, pfr said:

Hope you get it sorted. One more possible error with the plate is that technically Sterling are not the manufacturer of the caravan. Sterling is one of the Swift brand names. The manufacturer is Swift Group Ltd.


Yes. Hubby picked that up as well. 
whoever made the plate had no idea 😵🙄🤔

Edited by Frankie onyx
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1 hour ago, Bob Martin said:

G'day

 Take the plate off and get a copy made with the correct data on . Job done.

 

I don't believe I'm actually allowed to do that :unsure: I wish it was that easy.

 

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On 09/10/2020 at 14:34, PMW said:

 really, I always understood it meant  Maximum Technically Permissible Laden Mass. This is what it states in our caravan handbook.

:blush: My error for typing quickly before thinking - Sorry

 

On 09/10/2020 at 20:25, Lutz said:

Kerbweight is also old UK terminology. Current terminology is the same for all vehicles, whether caravans or towcars. In other words, MIRO and MTPLM should now be used in conjunction with towcars, too. Furthermore, kerbweight according to UK legislation does not include the driver, MIRO does.

 

Train weight is NOT maximum permitted weight of a loaded towcar plus the weight of any loaded trailer, but the maximum permitted sum of all axle loads.

Same answer as above 

As I said, "My thoughts that may help or confuse:-"

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On 09/10/2020 at 20:25, Lutz said:

Train weight is NOT maximum permitted weight of a loaded towcar plus the weight of any loaded trailer, but the maximum permitted sum of all axle loads.

Sorry, but you are wrong. The sum of the permitted axle weights is often more than the permitted train weight, to provide some loading tolerance.

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On 12/10/2020 at 16:56, Alan G H said:

Sorry, but you are wrong. The sum of the permitted axle weights is often more than the permitted train weight, to provide some loading tolerance.

In the UK it is Technically Permissible Max Laden Mass of the Combination it is the second mass on the drawing vehicles plate which is set by the manufacturer as  the technically permissible maximum laden mass of the combination’ (MC). This  means the maximum mass allocated to the combination of a motor vehicle and one or more trailers on the basis of its construction features and its design performances

 

For Australia under the Australian Design rules this is slightly different and is defined as being the maximum of the sum of the ‘Gross Vehicle Mass’ of the drawing vehicle plus the sum of the ‘Axle Loads’ of any vehicle capable of

being drawn as a trailer.   (Gross vehicle Mass would be MAM in the UK) so the interpretation is somewhat different. 

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On 09/10/2020 at 23:46, Frankie onyx said:

So the weight "1600kgs" is the load carrying capacity of the axle ?

If so, any idea how  we get the other plate changed ?

axle weigt,.jpeg

axle weight.jpg

 The Black Plate is the Australian Design Rules Compliance plate, so this trailer must have been through the Australian acceptance procedure (similar to the IVA in the UK)  , to change it it will need to be examined and retested.

 

The ADR definitions dont tie up exactly with the UK/European ones but:

 

TARE = Is roughly the same as the MRO in UK parlance so 1353kg

AGGREGATE TRAILER MASS = The same as Technically Permissable Max Laden Mass , so 1600 kg

LOAD CARRYING CAPACITY OF AXLE =  This can be seen as either the plated AXLE capacity IE 1600 kg or if the applicant chooses the mass transmitted to the ground through the wheels when coupled and at Aggregate trailer Mass  , So 1600 - what ever mass is on the coupler.

 

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On 12/10/2020 at 17:56, Alan G H said:

Sorry, but you are wrong. The sum of the permitted axle weights is often more than the permitted train weight, to provide some loading tolerance.

 

I'm sorry, but maybe I didn't express myself clearly enough. The train weight is the permitted sum of all actual axle weights, not the sum of all permitted axle weights. Therein lies the difference.

Edited by Lutz
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