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Hi,


I hope people don't mind. We got this wheel clamp and have been so impressed with it that we made a review of it. We kept it a few weeks to make sure it was as good as people say. I wish that I had found it quicker than 3 years into touring. I no longer dread getting that other wheel lock off.

 

Here we are doing a time trial between my new wheel lock and the old wheel lock.

 

 

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55 minutes ago, joanie said:

but on the other hand there are some insurance companies who do accept them

 

Obviously, but with emphasis on your use of the word 'some'.

 

But the AL-KO is fairly universally accepted by insurance companies, whereas the nemesis and others often aren't.

 

 

Edited by Guest
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Nemesis Ultra gets my vote. Fitted in seconds on our TA caravan. We used to have an AL-KO and it was so fiddly to fit (even on our SA caravan) that most of the time I never used it.

 

Any security device that's fitted is 100% better than one that's not! Our insurance company accepts it as well.

 

BH

 

 

 

 

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We have had both,first nemesis now AL-KO. The alkos are a pain to fit even with ep levelling . Nemesis as you say,seconds but and it is a big but,even i can see how I would get the nemesis off, the Alkos (we have two, mmm I would  struggle. They must be more secure)

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2 hours ago, Jezzerb said:

We have had both,first nemesis now AL-KO. The alkos are a pain to fit even with ep levelling . Nemesis as you say,seconds but and it is a big but,even i can see how I would get the nemesis off, the Alkos (we have two, mmm I would  struggle. They must be more secure)

 

I think the AL-KO are much more secure, I use a Nemesis but they aren't really very secure, just more convenient.

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I have not with a SA van found the AL-KO the "curse" many seem to find it.

 

I know from helping another that it can be very difficult to remove if the van has rolled back [or forward, but less likely as the brake works better that way], and is "leaning" on the flanks and so loading the bolt. The more so when the van has no mover to ease the side load.

 

I suggest it is way better to avoid using a "ramp", ie an inclined levelling block, but use a series of planks to incrementally gain the height, but critically the wheel rests on a flat level surface, not a slope.

That and only do the bolt up finger tight, not torqued up, view the brace as a tool just to help remove it not do it up.

 

 

 

Edited by JTQ
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Yes we never overtighten never had an issue getting it off, its aligning the bolt with the hole and the scratchy insert that I hate. Have put on felt pads and protective film.

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From looking at the video and listening to the sound made when the main body was tapped, it sounds like it's made from an aluminium casting. If that's so, it's very easily cut through.

Is it aluminium?

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On 28/09/2020 at 18:07, daveat92 said:

From looking at the video and listening to the sound made when the main body was tapped, it sounds like it's made from an aluminium casting. If that's so, it's very easily cut through.

Is it aluminium?

 

No, it's made from steel, though cutting is rarely the method of removal, the lock barrel is always the point of attack. . 

 

You need to take wheel lock claims with a pinch of salt. They are at best deterrents, none will make your caravan secure to a determined thief. As with many things these days a great number of claims are made to attract the gullible but when you look at those claims sometimes they mean very little. 

 

AL-KO wheel locks are tested to Sold Secure Diamond Standard, but what does that mean? How does it compare to other standards? It is very difficult to tell as despite twenty minutes trawling their website I cannot find any quantifiable figures for it. It's worth looking at who Sold Secure are, they are often referred to as an organisation, or agency, they are in fact a limited company. They work with, but have no formal links to any government body or insurance company.  They test and certify locks and other security devices and generally they do a good job in that we, the consumer can see which locks are better than others. But, and its a big but, only when they have been tested to the same standard. 

 

The purple line lock is approved by Thatcham which unlike sold secure is a vehicle specific research company which operates under guarantee and is funded by the insurance industry. It's member companies include Admiral, AXA, Aviva, Direct Line, LV, Zurich and many other major insurers. Thathcam products are tested not only to there own standards but also to European and international standards, something Sold Secure does not do, SO the Purple Line lock carries far better accreditation that the AL-KO. because of that accreditation we know that the Purple Line nemesis Ultra is tested and secure against freeze and shatter, the most common and effective way of defeating such devices nowadays. Sold Secure does not mention this, neither do AL-KO on their website. 

 

So which is more secure? I don't know, and neither do you, because they haven't been tested to the same standard, On paper the purple line is better and from personal experience and reports of problems from other owners the one I would choose, not least because the AL-KO is a ridiculous faff for twin axle caravans like mine.

 

I've also seen a mechanic, technician call him what you will remove an AL-KO lock which had become stuck and could not be unlocked from a wheel in about 15 seconds with a hammer and chisel. That doesn't fill me with confidence. Of course there is no telling if the same could not be done with the purple line and my guess is that it probably could, which makes neither better than the other, but does show that the AL-KO is simply not worth the extra cost and hassle. 

 

The Purple line has better accreditation, is easier to fit, less expensive and universal, meaning you can transfer it to your next van with out the need to buy more expensive adapters. Of course some people relate which is best directly to the price, if it's more expensive then it must be better so we will buy that one. A mentality seemingly more prevalent when it comes to our caravans than in most other walks of life. 

 

 

 

 

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Mercedes E350 CDi AMG Cabriolet, Lunar Freelander 640EW Twin Axle @1700kg

********* Naughty Step Aficionado And Grand Collector Of Naughty Points *********

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