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What is in your First-Aid kit?


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OH has put together a pretty comprehensive medical bag for both us and the dogs, the one thing that seems to get used regularly is Gaviscon!!

My contribution is a bottle of medicinal JDūüĎć

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Providing their are no minors requiring first aid, the single-medicine-cures-all sometimes helps.

First aid should be a core subject in schools.

Doesn't exist (Yes I did try it!) 

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6 minutes ago, Townie said:

I think that the reply by GAS was meant to be slightly tongue-in-cheek.

I hope so , but I know years ago some folk would have a couple of aspirins with the hair of the dog as a hangover cure.  It was when he mentioned the Scottish Breakfast  that reminded me of the side effects . :)

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1 minute ago, joanie said:

I hope so , but I know years ago some folk would have a couple of aspirins with the hair of the dog as a hangover cure.  It was when he mentioned the Scottish Breakfast  that reminded me of the side effects . :)

Having spent many happy times in Scotland, I found that the Scottish Breakfast would cause the side effects without any other drugs being necessary!!!!:D

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1 hour ago, Townie said:

I think that the reply by GAS was meant to be slightly tongue-in-cheek.

:D... Eh ? Em ? Naw ... I actually have taken this medication but only now and again and believe me it only delay's the inevitable Hangover but by then I'm on my 3rd Guinness... :D...

 

Kiddin aside even having an up to date St Johns or Red Cross  First Aid Manual as part of your reading is a great thing. Having some insight to Signs and Symptoms and having a basic knowledge and understanding on how to deal with a medical emergency will also give you confidence in dealing with a Stroke for example instead of being one of those morons who would rather get their phones out to record the incident....

 

GAS ,,,;)

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"to be auld and wise you must first be young and daft "

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I would add aspirin to the list, not for use as a pain killer but in case of a heart attack. Most people are not allergic to it but taking one can thin the blood a bit to help stop a second attack if the first has been survived. When out walking, particularly in the hills, I carry a couple of them since out in the middle of nowhere they can help you or somebody else survive/reduce the consequences until help arrives.

 

My first aid kit is small, few plasters, paracetamol, aspirin, imodium, tick tweezers. I went on an outdoor first aid course which covered practical things to use when out and about and was an excellent way of spending 2 days. Run by Mountain Sense and the trainers were members of the Keswick Mountain Rescue team so had a lot of practice. Current course cost is £125 on the website, so most people could afford to go on one. https://mountainsense.co.uk/

Edited by Paul1957
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Best thing I was ever taught when training in the year dot was, as well as being able to use and administer all manner of first aid kit, tie fancy knots, fancy bandages, splints and deal with snake bites and so on etc. was..................... prepare for the time when you come across a serious injury with no first aid kit or any help immediately available for miles............. as could and does happen.

 

The consultant said in such situations, the clothes you stand up in, plus a belt, plus a packet of safety pins can be life savers, he said that folk tend to run around looking for something sterile to staunch bleeding, when stuffing your sock or shirt sleeve in the hole will suffice, compression is usually the best way to staunch blood loss, A&E will clean the wound and administer antibiotics, a belt will serve  as part of a splint if needed and as a complete last resort as a tourniquet, they are too narrow and not pliable enough, whatever folk do in films, best to use cloth, e.g. shirt sleeve, but it is essential to only tighten it until bleeding stops and no more, most important is DO NOT RELEASE THE TOURNIQUET FOR ANY REASON.

 

It must stay on till the casualty reaches hospital no matter how long it takes, leaving it on for a prolonged time may cause tissue damage or very rarely loss of a limb, which is better than death, but releasing it without the correct procedures in place can also cause death due to toxins etc. released when the pressure is removed.

 

Ohh the safety, pins they make great emergency stitches with no knots to tie. ūüė≤ūü§£

 

 

 

 

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Common sense isn't a gift, it's a punishment because you have to deal with everyone who doesn't have it.  :rolleyes:

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Even duct tape or gaffer tape can be used to reduce bleeding.

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12 minutes ago, joanie said:

do tell.....

The tape can be used as a patch or as a compression bandage.  Could also hold splints in place for a broken limb.  Although I would cover the wound with cloth first!

Edited by kelper
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This worked well as I was trying to get something finished. It stung a bit when the paint thinners soaked through the tissue.

8A016085-5486-4D9C-88C3-012E4B3B90D2.jpeg

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20 hours ago, Paul1957 said:

I would add aspirin to the list, not for use as a pain killer but in case of a heart attack. Most people are not allergic to it but taking one can thin the blood a bit to help stop a second attack if the first has been survived. When out walking, particularly in the hills, I carry a couple of them since out in the middle of nowhere they can help you or somebody else survive/reduce the consequences until help arrives.

 

 

Totally agree. When I had a heart attack last year, one of the first things the paramedic did was to administer a squirt of GTN spray and to give me a chewable aspirin. Later, my Mrs realised that we didn't have any aspirin in the house so she went out and bought a pack for emergency use .

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9 hours ago, Townie said:

Totally agree. When I had a heart attack last year, one of the first things the paramedic did was to administer a squirt of GTN spray and to give me a chewable aspirin. Later, my Mrs realised that we didn't have any aspirin in the house so she went out and bought a pack for emergency use .

 

I read your post too quickly, I thought, G N T on the NHS, that sounds good, ūüćĻ¬† then I noticed it was GTN, ūüėĀ

 

Joking aside, nice to see you're doing OK.

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Common sense isn't a gift, it's a punishment because you have to deal with everyone who doesn't have it.  :rolleyes:

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On 24/09/2020 at 15:04, Silversurf said:

It must stay on till the casualty reaches hospital no matter how long it takes,

Can you provide a source?  I've always been trained to release a tourniquet, at intervals, but for a brief period.

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2 free flow adult oxygen masks

2 free flow paediatric masks

Opi plastic airways size 1-5

bag valve mask with infant adapter and filter

suction kit

I-Gel airway

2 bottles 02

1 bottle of Entonox with bite stick, free flow and on demand valves 

AED Defibulator set with spare pads

Pulse oximeter

Glyceryl trinitrate
asprin

paracetamol

glucogel

salbutamol

spacer

Abdominal large trauma bandage

Israeli dressing small with windlass

combat application tourniquet x 2

fracture straps

Adult neck brace

Infant neck brace

ferno head restraint

Low adhesive dressings x 10

crepe bandage x 4

cling film

tuba- grip

dressing support

triangular bandage 

gauze large x 4

razor x 4

sutures various gauge 

 

That’s bag 1 of 3.

 

I like to go prepared!..... Bet you can’t guess my occupation.

 

 

 

Edited by Pembssurfer
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37 minutes ago, kelper said:

Can you provide a source?  I've always been trained to release a tourniquet, at intervals, but for a brief period.


Il be the source for this for now but you never ever take off a tourniquet until the patient is in an hospital environment as blood work ups need to be done to check for potential toxins and supportive treatment on standby in the case of toxic shock which becomes a significant risk after 15 minutes of tourniquet being applied correctly.  If using the tourniquet on a crush injury then you NEVER remove it.

 

Tourniquets are certainly a life saving intervention but ideally the casualty needs to get to a hospital within 1 hour of it being applied. Once applied label the time of application on the tourniquet itself and the casualties forehead too if a sharpie or pen is to hand.  
 

 

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22 minutes ago, kelper said:

Can you provide a source?  I've always been trained to release a tourniquet, at intervals, but for a brief period.

 

The intermittent release theory is no longer applicable for several reasons, one being is that it may disrupt the clotting process leading to more blood loss, perfusing injured tissue with fresh blood can cause more problems than it prevents and there is the danger of toxins and pathogens from the injury site being introduced into the blood stream.

 

Most tissue, can withstand approx 2 hours with minimal blood flow before damage occurs, which in most incidents the patient would, hopefully, have entered hospital, within the next four hours tissue will die at around 6 hours after the initial application of the tourniquet and as this time span proceeds there is an even greater chance of causing death by releasing the tourniquet, after this time it's better to have to lose a limb than a life.

 

It's a very complex  and interesting subject which also encompasses crush injuries, where the initial feeling is to extract the victim as quickly as possible, however as above, this can have a catastrophic , even fatal effect on the victim, sometimes almost immediately, other times traumatic collapse of a patient apparently doing well after two or three days..

 

Much of the latest information, change in procedures, understanding and treatment of the victims has come from earthquake areas.

 

This gives  good explanation without delving too deep into the pathology of it all.

 

https://tinyurl.com/y9267zfu

 

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Common sense isn't a gift, it's a punishment because you have to deal with everyone who doesn't have it.  :rolleyes:

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9 hours ago, Silversurf said:

This gives  good explanation without delving too deep into the pathology of it all. https://tinyurl.com/y9267zfu

Thanks.  I'm retired now and my last training was probably ten years ago.  I'll read my St John's First Aid guide today.

I'm not likely to need it in my circumstances but who knows.

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I checked in my up-to-date St John's First Aid manual and tourniquet is not even mentioned.

Edited by kelper
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I have just checked my leeches, and cannot find a use-by date...any recommendations?

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Trevor.

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10 hours ago, kelper said:

I checked in my up-to-date St John's First Aid manual and tourniquet is not even mentioned.

It wouldn’t be as it’s for professional medical use only some paramedics are still not equipped with them which is madness.

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When I first started in the old bill we had two DAYS of first aid training delivered by St Johns Ambulance It was basically 30 minutes training crammed into two days!!

 

Towards the end we had our training from front line paramedics (what a terribly under valued profession!) The very best advice they gave us was dead simple.

 

DON’T faff about with anything, just ensure you do the very basic and most important things, so......

 

  1. Keep ‚Äėem breathing
  2. Stop ‚Äėem bleeding
  3. Keep that up ‚Äėtill we arrive to do the important stuff, if you‚Äôve been called we will not be very far behind you.

 

I considered that to be first class advice, and you know what ? It works!!

Edited by Mr Plodd
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Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

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When I did workplace First aid training two things were stressed.

1. We were to render First aid, that is to say before any professional assistance arrived. We were not there to stick a plaster on paper cuts or to try and actually fix things, just keep people alive and safe until help arrives.

2. The kit and knowledge had to fit the environment. e.g.in an office environment there is no need for splints etc. we could simply wait for paramedics, unlike when (say) hill walking. No need for a wide range of wound dressings, a large one could go on any wound. If we tried to cover every eventuality the kit would be so heavy and cumbersome that it would never be in the right place at the right time, far better to have smaller effective ones in lots of convenient places.

 

Of course, in a caravan it also makes sense to have a separate supply of other medical items, plasters, anti-histamines, painkillers etc. for when professional help is not going to be required.

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But if you live or overnight out in the sticks you might need to wait hours for an ambulance, so it makes sense to have a more-extensive kit than you city slickers.

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On 22/09/2020 at 20:17, Gordon said:

We carry a "First Aid" kit in all vehicles but in the MH we also have  "Medical Kit" that includes the sorts of things normally kept in the bathroom cabinet. The lists below are just as I thought of them without checking the contents listing held within each kit, so I may have missed some tings out.

 

First Aid Kit

Emergency first aid booklet

Disposable triangular bandage (non-sterile)

Traumafix dressing

Medium sterile dressing

Small plastic sealable bags to dispose of used dressings safely

Selection of plasters

Safety pins

Washproof clear plasters (assorted sizes)

Low adherent large dressing pad

Disposible ReviveAid face masks

Several pairs of large latex gloves (sealed in bags)

Small bottle of Sal Volatile

Burns dressing

Disposable heat retaining foil blanket (adult)

Small pair of scissors

Small sealed bottle sterile water

Sterile cleansing wipes (moist)

 

Medical kit

As first aid kit plus:-

Rennies or equivalent 

Optrex and eye bath

Cough mixture

Antihistamine

Paracetamol

Germaline

Ibuprofen

Imodium

Lemsip

Sinex

Earex

TCP

 

All medicines checked monthly and rotated to the house supply to keep them in date 


 

Blimy you carry more than we do in the ambulances. ūüėā

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Small bottle of brandy.  To settle my nerves and breath over the patient. 

On 27/09/2020 at 07:45, Mr Plodd said:

When I first started in the old bill we had two DAYS of first aid training delivered by St Johns Ambulance It was basically 30 minutes training crammed into two days!!

 

Towards the end we had our training from front line paramedics (what a terribly under valued profession!) The very best advice they gave us was dead simple.

 

DON’T faff about with anything, just ensure you do the very basic and most important things, so......

 

  1. Keep ‚Äėem breathing
  2. Stop ‚Äėem bleeding
  3. Keep that up ‚Äėtill we arrive to do the important stuff, if you‚Äôve been called we will not be very far behind you.

 

I considered that to be first class advice, and you know what ? It works!!

Sure does. ¬†ūüĎć

Kia KX 3 auto / Bailey Alicanto Grande Estoril and Swift Challenger 570 (2010 model Not towed - used as a static)
 

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