Jump to content

Levelling using steadies!


Recommended Posts

6 minutes ago, PMW said:

It is the road wheels which support the main weight of your van, and the issue here is lifting those off the floor with the corner steadies.

 

 

 

You'd need to put some serious grunt on the steadies to lift the wheels clear, I jacked my van up on axle stands during lockdown, took me ages to clear the floor!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 76
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

It isn't a case of "need"! Why do it the hard way when there is a tool available? Or should I get rid of my aquarolls and carry gerricans instead?

Experience is often the greatest Teacher in life, especially to the hard-of-listening.

I have a robot lawn mover, automatic car, smart light switches and bulbs, and other Alexa related items. I use the motor mover to move the caravan and use a drill (on the torque setting) to wind the s

Posted Images

7 minutes ago, PMW said:

It  has always been my belief that the difference is down to the presence of the jockey wheel protecting the front steadies from excessive load. 

 

My view as well. Steadies fixed to floor (only) jockey wheel fixed to chassis. In theory the chassis will not flex front to rear, but may twist side to side if supported on a single point on or near the centre line of the caravan (where the jockey wheel is) and the corner steadies will prevent that side to side/twisting movement. 

 

Thats my thinking and I am reasonably happy that I have the physics about right, so I shall continue to do all I deem sensible to prevent any damage to my expensive investment. Others of course are at liberty to totally disagree with me, I promise not to lose too much sleep if they do ;)

  • I agree completely 1

Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Ern said:

I didnt know anyone had said that people using a battery powered drill was lazy. I dont think lazy is an appropriate word at all. 

I used to have lawn mowers but now dont know what one looks like. I also have an auto car, flashy lights and curtains, Alexa on the first floor, Google on the ground floor, motor mover on the caravan, ran (my half of) an engineering  business for 40 years, had 2 heart attcks running it and couldnt really use a steady winder for a while, have 3 boys, a shed load of grand children, like caravanning and Im 30 years older than you. So what else did you say you have ? An electric drill? 

 

Sorry, I did not mean to cause offence. My point was that people look down on those of us who use a drill to wind the steadies, I have had comments made by "older caravaners" that I was lazy for using the drill, yet they use many other time and effort saving devices themselves. Why do they get to decide where we draw the line on what devices we can or cannot use either caravaning or in the rest of our lives. They may be joking when they make the comments, however, many a true word is said in jest.

 

I wanted to point out that just because I use lots of time and effort saving devices at my choice, it does not mean I am not getting exercise. I do not judge those who choose to or enjoy doing things a different way, some people love driving a manual car, or mowing the lawn with a push mower, I would never judge that. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Harmans said:

Sorry, I did not mean to cause offence. My point was that people look down on those of us who use a drill to wind the steadies, I have had comments made by "older caravaners" that I was lazy for using the drill, yet they use many other time and effort saving devices themselves. Why do they get to decide where we draw the line on what devices we can or cannot use either caravaning or in the rest of our lives. They may be joking when they make the comments, however, many a true word is said in jest.

 

I wanted to point out that just because I use lots of time and effort saving devices at my choice, it does not mean I am not getting exercise. I do not judge those who choose to or enjoy doing things a different way, some people love driving a manual car, or mowing the lawn with a push mower, I would never judge that. 

No offense taken at all. I think the subject is interesing (even serious) and quite entertaining. I am very much in favour of all of us doing what we think is what we want. Nuff said. Cheers mate.

Ern

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, joanie said:

and what do you do with all that extra time you've saved, no no , let me guess.....charge up your drill.   If you have set it on torque, do you get the winder out for uneven ground?

Now now Joanie,  you'll give yourself a headache joining in on mens stuff :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, SilverSurfer said:

Now now Joanie,  you'll give yourself a headache joining in on mens stuff :)

oh you naughty boy!

before anyone joins in on these sexist remarks, it's a joke, see the smiley face, a bit of banter :D :P

Edited by joanie
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If anyone calls me lazy for using an electric drill to wind the steadies, I am quite ready to agree with them :D

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
  • I agree completely 1

'I know' is just 'I Believe' with delusions of grandeur

Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4 PHEV 4H

Unicorn 4 Cadiz

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Artleknock said:

If anyone calls me lazy for using an electric drill to wind the steadies, I am quite ready to agree with them :D

 

Using an electric drill leaves a hand free to hold beer/wine/tea.

  • Haha 1

2018 Volvo V90 and 2018 Swift Sprite Quattro EB

Link to post
Share on other sites

For that you would need three hands :P

Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

Link to post
Share on other sites

Caravan set up= cup of tea and a break, then awning up = large g n t !!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jezzerb said:

Caravan set up= cup of tea and a break, then awning up = large g n t !!!

don't bother with the awning ........

Roughing it . . but in comfort . .

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Mr Plodd said:

For that you would need three hands :P

Four surely?

Ern

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Ern said:

Four surely?

 

Nobody like a smart ass, especially when they are right :P

  • Like 1

Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Mr Plodd said:

For that you would need three hands :P


Nah, all in one glass!

2018 Volvo V90 and 2018 Swift Sprite Quattro EB

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Dave Capiro owner said:


that won’t do the leccy drill much good.

 

It's a lazy mans cocktail stirrer.

2018 Volvo V90 and 2018 Swift Sprite Quattro EB

Link to post
Share on other sites

HWMBI says we shouldn’t use that many thing to put the steadies down, it puts too much strain on my back 🙃

I love my Bailey Unicorn Madrid, I do, I do, I do!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't want to do it like that - hahahha

On 17/09/2020 at 17:25, Mr Plodd said:

 

Nobody like a smart ass, especially when they are right :P

Or think they are?

Edited by Millomite

Bailey Cabrera Unicorn IV towed by a Jaguar F-Pace

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 14/09/2020 at 09:05, Grandpa Steve said:

 

I would suggest you put a set of scales under a steady and do exactly what you have suggested, you might be unpleasantly surprised by how much extra pressure you are putting on the floor by applying that extra turn.

 

 

But then without knowing the stress factors of a chassis the what would you do with the reading on the scales? Guess it all depends on the condition of the pitch, don’t think I’ve ever done an extra full ‘once round’ but I might get close on a ‘not so’ hardstanding or when the planks are sinking into practically soft earth. 

I would agree however that always doing an extra turn is poor advice.

 

For me, I think it’s something we all learn,,, you know when your steadies are only just down so next time you go a bit further!

 

I tend it go by feel, I know how much more I’m prepared to go as I feel the resistance I’m looking for.

 

Good discussion  :) 

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Dave Capiro owner said:

Does anyone know what force the automatic levelling systems exert on the steadies ?

 

I don't know much about them since I'll never have it fitted but I understood that most of the weight was carried on two jacks fitted on the axle.   So I imagine the corner steadies won't carry any more load than they do normally.

Citroen C5-X7 Tourer+Avondale Rialto 480/2
https://jondogoescaravanning.com

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Jaydug said:

 

I don't know much about them since I'll never have it fitted but I understood that most of the weight was carried on two jacks fitted on the axle.   So I imagine the corner steadies won't carry any more load than they do normally.

 

Been discussed at length, but I estimate the front legs on an E&P full system would carry VERY approximately a max of 100 Kg** each during the levelling process under normal conditions and assuming no uneven settlement during lifting. 

This assumes the jockey wheel is lifted off the ground during levelling and the caravan is unoccupied.

If the jockey wheel is left off the ground during occupancy this figure could easily double or more with people inside.

 

(** Shorter distance from axle fulcrum than jockey wheel would increase total load above noseweight, but as there are two legs this is then reduced back down per leg.) 

 

With manual (aka electric drill driven) steadies you can tweak as necessary during deployment and at any time during your stay to ensure even loading on soft ground. This what I do with my "compact system".

Occasionally on grass I also need to tweak the axle jacks after a couple of days (I back off the steadies first for obvious reasons). My axle jacks sit on larger than standard E&P pads.

As my axle jack pads do sink slightly sometimes on some surfaces, this must be just as likely with the full system.

I don't know how the "full system" deals with "settlement" during deployment or over time on soft ground to avoid uneven loads developing which could again increase loading/twisting forces on the body. The large pads on the full system legs will reduce settlement of the legs themselves, but not prevent it completely in all situations.

So, if you are on firm ground I envisage no issues at all with the full system.

On soft grass or unstable thick gravel or similar, I honestly don't know. I guess if unsure do a "re-level" from scratch after a couple of days?

I did ask E&P about all this when trying to decide on which system to buy. I was assured that the full system would be fine on soft ground, but none of my points regarding how it would maintain even loading were answered, so again. I just don't know.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...