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What do you tow with and what mileage on the clock?

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12 minutes ago, Mr Plodd said:

 

I for one certainly haven’t heard of a car failing it’s MOT due to rust for many years now, I think the last I can recall was an ancient Ford Ka. 

 

The corrosion is mainly on suspension components, cross members, subframes etc. These parts are usually bought in from outside suppliers and just have a thin coating of black paint. The main body of the car is usually very well sealed, painted and rust proofed by the manufacturer,prior to all the other bits being bolted on. 

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The bodywork tends not to rust now since they have 10 year paint warranties, the other bits which do rust are not covered after the initial 3 year warranty runs out. To keep the 10 year warranty though there might be a need for a bodywork check at the dealer, on PSA vehicles the first is at 4 years and then every 2 years at a cost of about £30.

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1 hour ago, Mr Plodd said:

Years ago rust is what killed cars

 

In 1964 we bought a new Ford Cortina to pull our Sprite Musketeer.   By 1970, it needed panels welded into the rear chassis boxes.   Since I had a towbar mounted on them, I worried about its integrity so I sold it on to a work-mate.   He kept it for another seven years, although he had cill panels welded into it.   In those days, the motor shops had all manner of replacement panels for popular cars, all ready to be welded on.     You could buy replacement wings moulded in glass-fibre for the popular rust-buckets. 


Citroen C5 Exclusive Estate+Avondale Rialto 480/2
https://jondogoescaravanning.com

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Bought our BMW X3 M40i in January 2020, it now has 3,000 miles on the clock currently.
3 litre straight six with 355bhp means it’s all too easy to exceed the speed limits when towing if you’re not careful.

Sensible driving it returns 30mpg, but this drops to sub-20mpg with the van on the back! Therefore route planning will involve locating petrol stations in more remote areas :D

 

Got a detachable Westfalia towbar and electrics fitted for £700 after BMW quoted £2k (from the same fitter, so went direct).

 

We then bought our first touring van, a 2018 Swift Sprite Quattro EB, which had hardly been used by the previous owners, in February 2020 therefore it’s never been used by us yet.
 

Itching to get away in it now!

 


Towing: 2018 Swift Sprite Quattro EB

Tow Car: 2020 BMW X3 M40i

 

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1 hour ago, Mr Plodd said:

 

I for one certainly haven’t heard of a car failing it’s MOT due to rust for many years now, I think the last I can recall was an ancient Ford Ka. 

 

 

The mk1 Ka and it's convertible cousin the Street Ka were renowned for rotting everywhere from the windscreen down.  Not so long ago I carried out some welding at the back of the inner sills on a Street Ka for a neighbour, it was awful.  The good metal is extremely thin, corrosion protection is non-existent, body mouldings held on with clips that snap when you try to remove them.  After doing it I remembered why I'd stopped working on other peoples cars years ago.

 

The majority of cars nowadays are much better than this.  Back in the 70's and 80's scrapyards were full of cars with floors falling out, gaping holes in door bottoms and wheel arches, nowadays a scrapyard looks like a used car dealership with seemingly pristine motors being confined to death due to a costly component or electrical problem.

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2018 Volvo V90 and 2018 Swift Sprite Quattro EB

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6 hours ago, Lutz said:

 

When I bought my caravan the Antara was already out of production, so that wasn't an option. Besides, the most powerful diesel engine in the Antara only developed 163hp, which I figured was a bit meagre to pull an 1800kg caravan.

 

Apart from the 9 Vauxhalls that I had, my wife had 3 Agilas in a row and none of them ever went back to the dealer other than for a regular service. She's now on her second Adam.

One of my sons has one of the first Adams(2013).He's had it from new and Vauxhall still honour the lifetime /100000 mile warranty. It seems a very well finished little car with even the most basic models having a good spec. His partner has a Touareg they use for towing with, so between them the two cars tick most boxes. I'm well pleased with my Zafira and another son has an Astra automatic he's happy with. Fellow a few doors away has just had his umpteenth new Astra, changing them every three years. Similar story with the much maligned French cars. Daughter has a 208 Peugeot. Had it on a three year Peugeot PCP. Ended up buying it at the end because she was happy with it. Another son has a 2015 Citroën Cactus he does a long commute in with no issues. His partner had a new C3 last year on a salary sacrifice scheme she's pleased with. My Renault Kangoo was a great car until the engine suffered a head gasket failure at 9 years and 125k miles. At least it died happy having been running perfectly to the last. The Renault Master we ran for 13 years and 100k miles had some issues over the years with the fuel system, but was running well when we sold it for a good price. 

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my first tow car was a 2004 skoda octavia 90bhp 1.9 tdi which was a little bit weasy thing had dont 200000 miles too but still went ok and pulled my lunar solar 462 van allway to scotland and wales a couple of times and then replaced that one with a 2003 octavia estate 1.9tdi 110bhp so bit pokier and just rolled over the 100000 mark now 

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Audi Q5 2.0 petrol 15k, 250bhp and almost same torque as diesel variant, smooth, quiet and no effort pulling our coachman vip575, 21mpg towing and around 36mpg on a run without, also have large transit and driven diesels for many years so aware of low down pulling power but car cruises at 60mph at only 1600revs and does not struggle at any speed really, petrol engines have come along way

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Now Touareg 2015 Escape 47K on the clock.  Previously a Landcruiser 120 series.  Had 90K when we got it had it 9 years 175K when we got rid never a problem with the engine.  The chassis was completely rotten though. 

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On 03/07/2020 at 16:54, Mr Plodd said:

The reason I ask is because a “friend of a friend” has an Outlander PHEV (but doesn’t tow with it) and he reckons the petrol engine is not really up to the job when loaded with 5 adults. Sure he gets a bit of boost from the ‘leccy bit, but that apparently doesn’t last very long. 

 

That info is of course third hand hand and I have no experience of it (but I half fancy an Outlander PHEV but with a 1500kg caravan I reckon that’s a bit optimistic) 

 

 

Well Andy as promised I said I will update you,.

 

On the 5th July we went to Black Knowl CMC site approximately 178.5 miles each way, we live near Stafford down the M6 Toll Road M6/M42/M40/A38/M3/M27 junction 2, as advised by the Dutch Outlander PHEV caravan owners allow the battery to discharge to about 50% then hit the charge button, this way you will have a power reserve for the hills, at speed below 40 mph switch back to EV mode.

 

Using this method absolutely no problems on the way down 26.7 mpg on the way back 27.3 mpg, towed as good as our Ford Kuga, you just need to change your driving style, used no fuel on the 2 weeks holiday just paid the odd CMC £2.00 @ day for a charge.

 

I spoke to 2 owners with the earlier 2 litre version, both never used the charge button and let the battery discharge to zero ?, one admitted his caravan was too heavy for his Outlander PHEV


2020 Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4  PHEV and 2016 Swift Conqueror 480 HT

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Oh that’s good news indeed! Many thanks for coming back with your experience and sharing it. 

 


Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

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1 hour ago, Mr Plodd said:

Oh that’s good news indeed! Many thanks for coming back with your experience and sharing it. 

 

The Outlanders has very clever electronics, Mitsubishi recommend using the Charge Mode on fast roads on speeds over 40/45 or so charging the batteries uses no extra fuel so can be used to propel the vehicle uphill this can be used in built up areas to use in EV mode (full electric).

 

However when towing distances the system needs some help, they recommend allowing to battery to discharge to around 50% then hit the charge button to maintain the charge in the battery, when going uphill you can feel the addition energy saved in the batteries push you up steep hills, running along the flat any addition energy is stored in the batteries slowing down/going down hill or braking etc energy from the regenerative system.


2020 Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4  PHEV and 2016 Swift Conqueror 480 HT

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5 minutes ago, Oscarmax said:

The Outlanders has very clever electronics, Mitsubishi recommend using the Charge Mode on fast roads on speeds over 40/45 or so charging the batteries uses no extra fuel so can be used to propel the vehicle uphill this can be used in built up areas to use in EV mode (full electric).

 

 

For charging the batteries to use "no extra fuel" is in contravention of the laws of physics, unless it is an alternative to using the brakes!

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3 minutes ago, Stevan said:

For charging the batteries to use "no extra fuel" is in contravention of the laws of physics, unless it is an alternative to using the brakes!

Stevan  when the  Outlander engine drives a generator which in turn drives the motors any excess energy being is stored in the batteries.


2020 Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4  PHEV and 2016 Swift Conqueror 480 HT

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2 minutes ago, Oscarmax said:

Stevan  when the  Outlander engine drives a generator which in turn drives the motors any excess energy being is stored in the batteries.

I am well aware of the flannel, but to drive a generator that is charging a battery requires energy, and that energy comes from fuel!

The only "excess energy" is that normally dissipated through the brakes 

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7 minutes ago, Stevan said:

I am well aware of the flannel, but to drive a generator that is charging a battery requires energy, and that energy comes from fuel!

The only "excess energy" is that normally dissipated through the brakes 

Ok you right and I am wrong


2020 Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4  PHEV and 2016 Swift Conqueror 480 HT

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