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Hello All! 

 

I'm pretty new to all this (and perhaps I have bitten off more than I can chew!) But I am at the moment, half way through building my own tiny house on a trailer! There isn't that much information out there in the tiny house world for the uk on these sort of specifics and I was really hoping that this community could help me! (I'm sorry I'm not a caravan!) 

 

I am planning on living in the tiny house pretty much full time once I have a spot I feel I can settle, but I would like to be as sustainable and resourceful as possible with how i consume water and energy. 

 

So you have an idea of my set up - I have a Truma water heater, and a spinflo water pump. And I have also just purchased a Triplex series 700 oven. 

 

https://www.jacksonsleisure.com/content/pdf/truma/truma-watersystems-ultrastore-rapid-ge-installation-operating-en.pdf (water heater instructions)

file:///C:/Users/user/Downloads/COOKER_IM_AM_SINS2326_Triplex_EN_LR.pdf (oven installation instructions)

 

So currently i have two 8mm gas pipes to run out of my house, one for the water heater and one for the oven (as i believe you can't store gas bottles inside the house - makes sense!) So one of my questions is... once the pipes run out of the house where do they connect to first? A regulator? Are there any on the market that will take 2x8mm pipes? And can that regulator just be mounted to the side of the house? It's suitable to be outdoors in all weathers? I ask this as I believe a lot of caravans have their set up inside an internal locker in the van itself?

 

My second question is - Do I need a gas locker? 

 

My third question is(!) - considering my set up, what size bottle of propane is it suitable to buy? And say that i live in the house for 30 days at a time. I have no idea how long these things last for. 

 

As you can tell from my questions I am an utter novice, so please be kind! Looking forward to being part of your community. :-)

Emma x

 

 

 

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There are lots of regulations regarding gas installation in caravans. These include things like fixed vents, gas drops etc etc. 
you really need to get a qualified gas fitter, with caravan experience  to deal with this. 
with regards consumption of gas. In summer a 6kg will last weeks. In winter you can go through a bottle every couple of days

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Hello and welcome - sounds like a bold venture.

Is it one of the Tiny House kits you are using to build?

https://www.tinyecohomesuk.com/

and https://theswitch.co.uk/blog/technology/tiny-house-uk

You mention that you want to live in it pretty much full time when you have found somewhere you like - do be aware that planning legislation will treat this like a caravan, so it may not be easy to find somewhere to site it for living purposes.

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Emma, as you have found the need to ask about fitting  a gas system to your project , it is obvious that you do not have the required knowledge to carry out such a job.

As Lost in the Wilderness has said, there are a lot of regulations regarding the fitting and testing of gas and as such you MUST get a Gas Safe LPG engineer to do the work.

It is NOT something you can do yourself.

 

I am such a Gas Safe LPG registered engineer and must emphasise the danger you would put yourself in by not having an engineer do the work.

Unlike a fault with electric where you may get a shock, or a fault with water where you may get wet, any fault with a gas installation WILL KILL YOU !!!!

 

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I have a feeling that the OP is not quite what it seems.

I first wondered if it was a wind-up to get us all pointing out how dangerous DIY gas is, and that you can't just tow a caravan (or a Tiny home) to a place you like and live in it.

Since then I wonder if it is simply a publicity attempt, as the OP seems to share a name with somebody linked to a commercial supplier.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
21 minutes ago, 2seaside said:

I have a feeling that the OP is not quite what it seems.

I first wondered if it was a wind-up to get us all pointing out how dangerous DIY gas is, and that you can't just tow a caravan (or a Tiny home) to a place you like and live in it.

Since then I wonder if it is simply a publicity attempt, as the OP seems to share a name with somebody linked to a commercial supplier.

 

 

Oh yes you can. it is called a caravan site

https://www.tinyecohomesuk.com/tiny-home-trailers/

Edited by Guest
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4 hours ago, 2seaside said:

I was not aware that you can live "pretty much full time" on a touring caravan site?

 

Iirc they have to be licenced for residential. Otherwise there is a maximum stay I one go limit. 

A seemingly problem free 2010 model Adria Altea 542dk that has more than its fair share of use.

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Posted (edited)
52 minutes ago, clairendave said:

Iirc they have to be licenced for residential. Otherwise there is a maximum stay I one go limit. 

I am not sure, but I think it is 21 days at a time for touring , but seasonal pitch is 11 months then have to vacate for at least a month depending on the site

there more info here.

https://www.caravanhelper.co.uk/living-in-a-touring-caravan-permanently/

Edited by Guest
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3 minutes ago, oldboy said:

I am not sure, but I think it is 21 days at a time for touring , but seasonal pitch is 11 months then have to vacate for at least a month depending on the site

there more info here.

https://www.caravanhelper.co.uk/living-in-a-touring-caravan-permanently/

 

21 days is a self-imposed limit by the Caravan Club - CL/CS sites are 28 days.

2015 VW Touareg 3. 0 V6 TDI + 2013 Lunar Clubman ES

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, 2seaside said:

I was not aware that you can live "pretty much full time" on a touring caravan site?

 


The OP didn’t say whether or not her Tiny House was being built on a towable trailer chassis or on a static caravan chassis.  She didn’t mention touring either but let’s assume it is a towable version...

 

Seasonal pitches are available for up to eleven months per year - I’d call that ’pretty much full time’.   Example Here

 

Quote

SEASONAL PITCH INFORMATION

The site fees this season are £1,750 which is for an 11 month year which runs from February 1st – December 31st.  We also require a one off £50 pitch clearance bond which is returned when you leave the site as long as the pitch is cleared in its entirety.


If on a static caravan undercarriage, again holiday parks are available that only close for a month per year to a comply with their non residential licence.


That said, I too lean with the notion that a bit of Tiny House promotion may have been the purpose of the OP.

 

5 minutes ago, oldboy said:

I am not sure but I think it is 21 days at a time for touring , but seasonal pitch is 11 months then have to vacate for at least a month depending on the site

I believe that the norm is 28 days in local authority licensing but the big clubs and sites operating under their auspices electively restrict stays to 21 days.  

Edited by ReggiePerrin
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I have no idea what restrictions are placed on touring pitches, but it will not be possible to take a pitch on either a static holiday park or a residential park home site.

No residential park,  and very few holiday static parks,  accept "bring-ons".

The holiday parks that do usually only take standard statics transferred from another licensed site; bowling up with a "tiny home" would give them conniptions:D.

I believe that these "tiny homes" are on a touring chassis, with the idea that they can be towed from site to site.

But I suspect that being allowed to keep it on a seasonal site for 11 months is one thing, being allowed to stay in it for 11 months is totally different, and could result in the site losing it's licence.

 

 

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1 hour ago, 2seaside said:

I have no idea what restrictions are placed on touring pitches, but it will not be possible to take a pitch on either a static holiday park or a residential park home site.

No residential park,  and very few holiday static parks,  accept "bring-ons".

The holiday parks that do usually only take standard statics transferred from another licensed site; bowling up with a "tiny home" would give them conniptions:D.

I believe that these "tiny homes" are on a touring chassis, with the idea that they can be towed from site to site.

But I suspect that being allowed to keep it on a seasonal site for 11 months is one thing, being allowed to stay in it for 11 months is totally different, and could result in the site losing it's licence.

 

 

So what is the different staying in a touring caravan for 11 months?

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It is not so much staying in a touring caravan for 11 months that is the problem, it is finding somewhere for the touring caravan to stay for the 11 months .

I believe that if the people who sell these shepherd hut type things are forced to explain, they admit that you have to keep moving it from site to site in order to live in it. They never seem to put this information in their headlines, maybe they prefer people to think it is as easy as towing it to a nice field and setting up home (as opposed to  a certain section of the community who prefer setting up in Asda car park)(sorry).

 

Even sites (such as those used by seasonal workers or caravan club rallies) which may not need a caravan site licence still  need planning permission. (The exception will be if it is in the garden of  house and ancillary to the house). Otherwise planning permission is needed.

In addition to the terms of the planning permission (which will state how many, how long, and whether holiday or residential) there will be site licence terms (usually including how long, how many, and whether used for holiday or residential...).

Most touring site licences/planning terms either restrict how long a particular van can be on the pitch, or how long a particular van can be continuously occupied, so that they can be sure it is being used for holiday purposes not residential.

Static sites may not restrict useage as such, but will specify that it cannot be used as your main home, which is why reputable static site operators insist on seeing proof that you have a permanent home elsewhere, either in the UK or abroad.

 

 

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Before we moved our van was on a pitch ready to use CW awning for 3 solid years.  We didn't have to move it as the site was available to use 365 days a year.  There was a period of stay restriction but we can't remember how long it was. 

A seemingly problem free 2010 model Adria Altea 542dk that has more than its fair share of use.

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That's the difference.

The van can stay on the pitch and you come and go at leisure according to the stay restrictions.

If you are living in it, you either have to find somewhere else to go at regular intervals, or keep moving the van.

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Posted (edited)
On 03/05/2020 at 22:23, Brecon said:

Emma, as you have found the need to ask about fitting  a gas system to your project , it is obvious that you do not have the required knowledge to carry out such a job.

As Lost in the Wilderness has said, there are a lot of regulations regarding the fitting and testing of gas and as such you MUST get a Gas Safe LPG engineer to do the work.

It is NOT something you can do yourself.

 

I am such a Gas Safe LPG registered engineer and must emphasise the danger you would put yourself in by not having an engineer do the work.

Unlike a fault with electric where you may get a shock, or a fault with water where you may get wet, any fault with a gas installation WILL KILL YOU !!!!

 

 

You don't need to be Gas Safe to work on private tourers or motorhomes many service engineers are not and only competent to a standard .

https://www.nccacademy.org.uk/caravan-gas-training

 

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave
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Posted (edited)
38 minutes ago, CommanderDave said:

 

You don't need to be Gas Safe to work on private tourers or motorhomes many service engineers are not and only competent to a standard .

https://www.nccacademy.org.uk/caravan-gas-training

 

 

Dave

The OP does not have a private tourer or  motorhome, it is not type approved,  it is classed as a Mobile Home, which DOES fall into the Gas Safe regulations and to suggest anything else is completely out of order !

Please do NOT try and tell me what is and what is not allowed, I work with the stuff every day.  

Edited by Brecon
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1 hour ago, Brecon said:

The OP does not have a private tourer or  motorhome, it is not type approved,  it is classed as a Mobile Home, which DOES fall into the Gas Safe regulations and to suggest anything else is completely out of order !

Please do NOT try and tell me what is and what is not allowed, I work with the stuff every day.  


According to the website, road legal tiny homes are built on type approved trailer chassis’.   A mobile home (in the accepted sense and which they will also build) of course is not road legal and thus does not require type approval for its chassis.
 

Quote

Road legal trailers come with a type approved EU certificate of conformity which means they can be used in the UK and Europe.
 

Tiny Homes Website


Arguable then that a road legal towable tiny home,  a differently shaped and cumbersome caravan is a tourer by virtue of being road legal. 
 

 

Who was trying to tell you what is and what isn’t allowed?  Does the fact that ‘you work with the stuff every day’ make the statement, 

 

You don't need to be Gas Safe to work on private tourers or motorhomes many service engineers are not and only competent to a standard .”

 

untrue or otherwise inaccurate?

 

image.jpeg.4d69143c2e13dbfb5fa4fb4245e0790a.jpeg

 

I'd not want to tow it myself but it is just a strange looking twin axle caravan.

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Posted (edited)

Logically thinking here. Don't  trailers have to be type approved now.   To which adding a dwelling onto a pre-built trailer is not the same as having a type approved caravan that I imagine covers everything not just the chassis. 

Edited by clairendave

A seemingly problem free 2010 model Adria Altea 542dk that has more than its fair share of use.

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Posted (edited)
34 minutes ago, ReggiePerrin said:

You don't need to be Gas Safe to work on private tourers or motorhomes many service engineers are not and only competent to a standard .”

 

untrue or otherwise inaccurate?

 

Not accurate in as much as that statement gives the impression that anyone can do gas work on private caravans or motorhomes when in fact it is ONLY the owner of said caravan or motorhome who can ONLY work on his own vehicle without being qualified,if the vehicle is for his sole use only,  but he must work to the current rules.

 

Anyone working on another persons vehicle as part of a business, such as a caravan engineer, must be trained and certified to a minimum of STGW level.

 

Many caravan engineers are qualified to STGW (or ACoPS  as it was) and that only covers the servicing, repair and testing of specific items, it does not qualify to carry out new installation of a gas service, and is only valid for caravans and motorhomes which are privately owned and not rented out as part of a business , it does not cover what the OP is proposing.

 

 

Edited by Brecon
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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Brecon said:

The OP does not have a private tourer or  motorhome, it is not type approved,  it is classed as a Mobile Home, which DOES fall into the Gas Safe regulations and to suggest anything else is completely out of order !

Please do NOT try and tell me what is and what is not allowed, I work with the stuff every day.  

 

1 hour ago, Brecon said:

 

Not accurate in as much as that statement gives the impression that anyone can do gas work on private caravans or motorhomes when in fact it is ONLY the owner of said caravan or motorhome who can ONLY work on his own vehicle without being qualified,if the vehicle is for his sole use only,  but he must work to the current rules.

 

Anyone working on another persons vehicle as part of a business, such as a caravan engineer, must be trained and certified to a minimum of STGW level.

 

Many caravan engineers are qualified to STGW (or ACoPS  as it was) and that only covers the servicing, repair and testing of specific items, it does not qualify to carry out new installation of a gas service, and is only valid for caravans and motorhomes which are privately owned and not rented out as part of a business , it does not cover what the OP is proposing.

 

 

 

 

3 hours ago, Brecon said:

The OP does not have a private tourer or  motorhome, it is not type approved,  it is classed as a Mobile Home, which DOES fall into the Gas Safe regulations and to suggest anything else is completely out of order !

Please do NOT try and tell me what is and what is not allowed, I work with the stuff every day.  

 

 

This is not a mobile home but road legal tourer caravan and would need to be stage built type approved it will need a IVA test once built to obtain EU type approval to be legal ? 

Same as a caravan manufacturer buys a type approved chassis then builds their body and then the whole caravan is tested to obtain EU whole vehicle type approval before it can be used on a public highway .

https://www.vehicle-certification-agency.gov.uk/vehicletype/multi-stage.asp

 

A mobile home is still a caravan .

 

 

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave

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Posted (edited)

Is not EU type approval for the UK becomes history soon? unless of course it will be  exported to the EU

Edited by Guest
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How did a post that clearly pointed out that DIY gas work is extremely dangerous for anyone who does not know exactly what they are doing (which the OP clearly does not) get turned into a debate about whether or not it is legal?

Surely posts saying/suggesting/implying there is no law against it could encourage the "it can't be that hard" brigade to have a go themselves.

While I have no real objection with them either exploding or being poisoned, I would prefer not to take the risk that they will explode near me.

So if the OP is still reading - take heed of the posts telling you NOT TO TRY AND FIT GAS APPLIANCES YOURSELF.

And poor electrics can be the major cause of fire, and electric socks can kill, so get the electrics checked by somebody competent as well.

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, CommanderDave said:

You don't need to be Gas Safe to work on private tourers

 

Whilst that is true the exception is extremely narrow, only a van used purely by yourself as a touring caravan for short holidays in multiple locations is exempt from Gas Safe regs. As the OP stated ....

 

On 03/05/2020 at 17:20, Emma Pile said:

I am planning on living in the tiny house pretty much full time

 

... then Gas Safe regs WOULD apply. They apply to any touring caravan which could be classed as a second home, temporary residence, permanently sited or sited in a single location for long periods, such as a seasonal pitch. They also apply if anyone else uses your van whether through a commercial agreement or a casual lend, and they also apply if you use your van in relation to carrying on a business in any way, for example if you use your caravan for accommodation whilst working away from home or attending a trade fair or exhibition related to your employment.

 

There really is nothing to debate here, the gas installation MUST be carried out by a suitably qualified person with Gas Registration in the correct category for touring caravans and signed off accordingly. 

Edited by PMW
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