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Short “Essential only” journeys and possible DPF failure?


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The thought has occurred to me that as we are now limited to very short journeys with our cars basically to do our weekly shop, what effect, if any, is that going to have on DPF’s?

 

Once we get back to “normality” Will we see a steep rise in their failure rate because the short journeys mean they don’t get up to operating temperature and the journeys we are making at present are too short to allow enough time for a re-gen to take place?  

 

Just one one more thing to worry about :rolleyes:

 

Andy

Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

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We use the petrol car for short journeys and the diesel one for long which at the moment is a round trip to the supermarket of about 24 miles.

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Worry about it when it happens. There's enough other things to worry about. 

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Graham

 

Unless otherwise stated all posts are my personal opinion 

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11 minutes ago, Durbanite said:

We use the petrol car for short journeys and the diesel one for long which at the moment is a round trip to the supermarket of about 24 miles.

We are the same, we have a  petrol Meriva for short journeys and the diesel  S-max for long ones and towing the van. Neither have turned a wheel since the middle of March and we'll keep it like that for as long as possible. We even managed to get a delivery slot with Morrison's for  23rd so we should be able to manage until then

 

As Wispman says worry about stuff when it happens - hope for the best but plan for the worst and then you wont have to worry because you've got a plan to cover it

Edited by matelodave

2018 S-Max Titanium 2. 0 Tdci (177. 54bhp,180ps,132kw) Powershift + 2015 Unicorn III Cadz, Ventura Marlin porch awning

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Our car isnt likely to have a DPF failure for a good while at the presen rate. I've lost the habit of watching the price of diesel too. We bought the car at Christsmas and its barely turned a wheel since. I hope its still out there on the drive. Ill have a look.............directly....................tomorrow. B)

Ern

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Not a problem for me, I'm still doing my daily commute 50 miles round trip, but for those not using their car you may want to think about trickle charging your battery .

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, Dave Capiro owner said:

Not a problem for me, I'm still doing my daily commute 50 miles round trip, but for those not using their car you may want to think about trickle charging your battery .

 

Will that help the DPF ??   ;) ;) ;) :rolleyes:

 

Andy

 

 Before  anyone jumps in it’s a tongue in cheek comment ! 

Edited by Mr Plodd
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Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

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22 minutes ago, Mr Plodd said:

The thought has occurred to me that as we are now limited to very short journeys with our cars basically to do our weekly shop, what effect, if any, is that going to have on DPF’s?

 

Once we get back to “normality” Will we see a steep rise in their failure rate because the short journeys mean they don’t get up to operating temperature and the journeys we are making at present are too short to allow enough time for a re-gen to take place?  

 

Just one one more thing to worry about :rolleyes:

 

Andy

 

Number 2 sons customers have been asking him this question and he says that for most folk there will obviously be very few short journeys per week or month in the present situation to cause any problems, they simply won't be doing the mileage or engine running hours, however if the car was about to reach the re-gen stage it may bring it to that point quicker and that the inability to go for a longish fast run to promote re-gen may need a forced re-gen to be done in a garage.

 

He has a couple of companies whose vehicles, mainly small Ford courier size,  only do multiple stop start journeys per day, plumbers, electricians etc. who have been beset with this problem in normal times and the vehicles end up in his workshop  for forced re-gens quite frequently, the companies will be replacing these with petrol vans when the time comes.

 

 

Common sense isn't a gift, it's a punishment because you have to deal with everyone who doesn't have it.  :rolleyes:

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43 minutes ago, Ern said:

Our car isnt likely to have a DPF failure for a good while at the presen rate. I've lost the habit of watching the price of diesel too. We bought the car at Christsmas and its barely turned a wheel since. I hope its still out there on the drive. Ill have a look.............directly....................tomorrow. B)

Diesel is now down to £1.119p a litre and if you got the Fuelpecker discount card, it is another .04p off!  Just a pity we cannot take advantage of the drop in the fuel price!

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The Passat is getting used one day a week for my commute (65 miles), the A2 is currently doing the bulk of my commute and doesn’t have a DPF anyway (Euro 4)

 

I’d imagine doing one short trip a week will make no difference to the DPF at all.

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29 minutes ago, Durbanite said:

Diesel is now down to £1.119p a litre and if you got the Fuelpecker discount card, it is another .04p off!  Just a pity we cannot take advantage of the drop in the fuel price!

It was down to £1.08 and petrol £1.01 at my local Morrisons when I got the shopping yesterday. I have a near full tank and it's the first time the car has moved in two weeks. Hopefully the prices stay low when we are allowed back out to the wild.

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We're only using our Aygo for the weekly shopping.  The Grand Cherokee and V70 are both fairly redundant at the moment.

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1 hour ago, Mr Plodd said:

The thought has occurred to me that as we are now limited to very short journeys with our cars basically to do our weekly shop, what effect, if any, is that going to have on DPF’s?

 

Once we get back to “normality” Will we see a steep rise in their failure rate because the short journeys mean they don’t get up to operating temperature and the journeys we are making at present are too short to allow enough time for a re-gen to take place?  

 

Just one one more thing to worry about :rolleyes:

 

Andy

In all likelyhood youre unlikely to have a problem. As an example my 4.4 TDV8 Range Rover went for just short of 3 months doing 3 miles per day, never getting  to the right conditions to run a regen. I was able to monitor the soot load and whilst it did build up, it didnt build up at an alarming rate certainly not at a rate to worry about despite being used in these very unfavourable conditions. As soon as I did go on a longer journey the regen started straight away and the soot was cleared.

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At the moment I am covering 9 miles per week taking the wife to Tesco's and Morrison, we filled up the fuel tank the other day at this rate it will take approximately 52 trip to Tesco's to empty the fuel tank ?

2020 Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4  PHEV and 2016 Swift Conqueror 480 HT

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I do not think the reduced mileage and short trips we will be doing over the next weeks/months will affect dpfs much. Most of the trips on our main diesel car are short shopping trips with the occasional long one. We have never had a dpf problem and that is over the last 5 years. The tow cars have had dpfs for the last 14 years and they have not had dpf problems but they have been used mostly on long trips.

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On 02/04/2020 at 13:18, AJGalaxy2012 said:

In all likelyhood youre unlikely to have a problem. As an example my 4.4 TDV8 Range Rover went for just short of 3 months doing 3 miles per day, never getting  to the right conditions to run a regen. I was able to monitor the soot load and whilst it did build up, it didnt build up at an alarming rate certainly not at a rate to worry about despite being used in these very unfavourable conditions. As soon as I did go on a longer journey the regen started straight away and the soot was cleared.


The Range Rover was probably Euro 5, the DPF’s cycled much less than Euro 6 cars

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This is where the Outlander PHEV pays off, it does short journeys on lectricery.

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'I know' is just 'I Believe' with delusions of grandeur

Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4 PHEV 4H

Unicorn 4 Cadiz

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8 minutes ago, Artleknock said:

This is where the Outlander PHEV pays off, it does short journeys on lectricery.

I wouldnt have thought the PHEV would have a DPF?

 

13 minutes ago, FrankBullet said:


The RR was probably Euro 5, the DPF’s cycled much less than Euro 6 cars

You may be right, I havent compared it to any others.

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Ours only does around 300 miles a fortnight with on average 3 miles per journey, been doing this for eight years now, four of them with Euro 6 and had no issues.

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It's highly likely that some people may have a DPF warning light and/or oil dilution issues if this continues for months.

 

All down to individual circumstances, the journeys and the vehicle.

 

For me we have a couple of petrols in the household so not a problem.

 

Since the lockdown the mileage on my diesel Jag has actually doubled as I can no longer car share on my communte due to social distancing.

 

Lee

Yeti 2.0TDi DSG 4X4 L&K, Octavia TSi Manual, Citigo ASG, Swift Challenger.

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9 hours ago, Durbanite said:

We use the petrol car for short journeys and the diesel one for long which at the moment is a round trip to the supermarket of about 24 miles.

 

Same here

Les

 

 

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2 hours ago, logiclee said:

It's highly likely that some people may have a DPF warning light and/or oil dilution issues if this continues for months.

 

I think I am correct in saying that if you have an instantaneous mpg facility and have it permanently showing, every time you come off the throttle, you should show 99mpg unless regen is in operation which then gives you the opportunity to carry on driving till complete.

Sam :beardy:   RR Sport HSE Dynamic towing Swift Elegance Grande 845

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The Freelander hasn’t been used for 3 weeks. I had to start it yesterday to make some space on the drive. It cranked very slow and just caught, it’s now hooked up to the Ctec charger for as long as it takes for a return to work. Been using the leaf for shopping etc. I charged it up 3 weeks ago and it’s still showing a 75 mile range.

 

Surreal times.

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No restrictions here. Everything is basically normal so long as I don't get too close to anybody. I'm still going through a tank full of diesel every 3 weeks or so.

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