Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Testing capacity for COVID-19

In early May, the government set out another challenge to increase testing capacity to 200,000 tests per day by the end of May. This target was met on 29 May and continues to be met daily.

 

Deaths

As of 5pm on 15 August, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 41,366 have died across all settings within 28 days of that test.

Of that 41,366 just 5 (five) passed away on 14 August 2020.

 

Last updated 16 August 2020

Link to source data

 

Press release

Public encouraged to register for COVID-19 vaccine trials as 100,000 already sign-up

Over 100,000 people have volunteered to take part in COVID-19 vaccine trials, helping to speed up efforts to discover a safe and effective vaccine.

  • Over 100,000 people have signed up for future COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials through the NHS COVID-19 vaccine research registry
  • volunteers are helping speed up efforts to find a safe and effective vaccine in the fight against coronavirus
  • UK researchers urge more volunteers across all groups to sign-up, especially the over 65s and those from Black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds

 

Over 100,000 people have volunteered to take part in COVID-19 vaccine trials, helping to speed up efforts to discover a safe and effective vaccine.

 

The government is today (Monday 17 August) encouraging more people to join the thousands of volunteers and sign up to the NHS COVID-19 Vaccine Research Registry to help the NHS in the fight against coronavirus and ensure potential candidates work for everyone.

 

To enable large-scale vaccine studies to take place across the UK, the aim is to get as many people as possible signed up to the Registry by October.

 

Researchers particularly welcome people from all parts of society, especially those who are more likely to benefit from a vaccine, including the over 65s, frontline health and social care workers, and those from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic backgrounds.

 

Clinical studies with a diverse pool of volunteers will help scientists and researchers better understand the effectiveness of each vaccine candidate and will considerably speed up efforts to discover a safe and workable vaccine.

 

Business Secretary Alok Sharma said:

"From John O’Groats to Land’s End, everyone has played their part in tackling coronavirus from wearing face coverings to following social distancing guidance."

"Scientists and researchers are working day and night to find a vaccine that meets the UK’s rigorous regulatory and safety standards, but they need hundreds of thousands of people of all backgrounds and ages to sign-up for studies to speed up this vital research."

"I urge everyone to play our part in the fight against coronavirus and join the 100,000 people who have already registered, so we can help save and protect millions of lives."

 

Chair of the government’s Vaccines Taskforce Kate Bingham said:

"Protecting those at risk is the only way we will end this pandemic. That’s why we are working as quickly as possible to run clinical studies on the most promising vaccines to see whether they offer protection against COVID-19, whilst adhering to the UK’s strict safety and regulatory processes. And we need people throughout the UK to sign up to the registry to help us achieve this."

"Getting 100,000 volunteers on board is a great start but we need many more people from many different backgrounds that we can call on for future studies if we are to find a vaccine quickly to protect those who need it against coronavirus."

 

Consultant Respiratory Physician and Director of the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) PRC, Bradford, Dinesh Saralaya said:

"The best way to protect us from future outbreaks is to develop effective vaccines. Several vaccine trials are being conducted around the UK in the coming months and it is important that we all sign up to be contacted about them.

I would like to reassure people that research trials and studies are strictly regulated for ethics and safety. They are conducted within the framework of the NIHR, which is the research partner of the NHS, and we take every precaution to safeguard participants taking part. This includes appointments in settings like sports halls close to where people live and work rather than in hospitals."

"By working together, we can produce efficient vaccines which are likely to protect all sections of our society from this dreadful virus in future."

 

18-year-old Marium Zumeer from Bradford, who was hospitalised after contracting COVID-19, has first-hand experience of the benefits of taking part in clinical trials. During her time in intensive care, she was offered the opportunity to take part in the national RECOVERY trial, which is testing a range of potential treatments for COVID-19. This includes the drug dexamethasone, which was found to be the first drug to be effective when treating those who are critically ill with the virus.

 

RECOVERY trial volunteer Marium Zumeer said:

"I will always be grateful for being encouraged to sign up. I remember my dad at the time urging me to take part, not just for myself but for the wider community. The result has been really positive for me and I would encourage others to do their bit in helping us all in the fight against coronavirus."

 

Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty said:

"I’m very grateful to those who have volunteered for researchers to contact them to take part in COVID-19 vaccine studies, via the NHS COVID-19 vaccine research registry. The more people who volunteer to take part the more likely we find an answer to whether any vaccine is effective."

"Having 100,000 volunteers in just four weeks shows the selflessness of the public and is testament to the speed of work done by the Vaccines Taskforce, National Institute for Health Research and others to make signing up possible.

I urge people to continue to sign up. It is important that we have people from different backgrounds and ages as volunteers, so that the vaccines that are developed work for everyone."

 

A number of trials in the UK are expected to begin this autumn, working with the NHS, research institutions and businesses, helping to develop and manufacture the vaccines.

 

Launched on 20 July, the NHS COVID-19 Vaccine Research Registry is an online service allowing members of the public to register their interest in COVID-19 vaccine studies and be contacted to participate in future clinical trials.

 

Vaccines are tested in stages to ensure they are safe and effective. Volunteers who are contacted to take part in trials will be given information about what stage a particular vaccine is at and details of how it has already been tested. They will be able to consider this when deciding to take part and people can withdraw from the registry at any point.

 

The Registry has been developed by the government, in partnership with the NIHR, NHS Digital, the Scottish and Welsh governments and the Northern Ireland Executive.

 

Published 17 August 2020

Link to source data

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 52
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Rather brutal figures here so I would encourage anybody who still thinks it is a good idea to ignore the government's requirement to stay indoors unless they are a key worker or their journey is absol

FYI if you have not received  a letter from 10 Downing Street, below is a copy of what has been sent out.    

Prime Minister's statement on coronavirus (COVID-19): 3 July 2020 (Transcript of the speech, exactly as it was delivered)   "Good evening, Since I last spoke to you from this podiu

Posted Images

Guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): how to self-isolate when you travel to the UK

 

When you arrive in the UK, you will not be allowed to leave the place where you’re staying for the first 14 days you’re in the UK (known as ‘self-isolating’) unless you’re arriving from an exempt country.

 

This is because it can take up to 14 days for coronavirus symptoms to appear. If you’re travelling to the UK for less than 14 days, you will be expected to self-isolate for the length of your stay.

 

If you’re travelling from an exempt country you will not need to self-isolate. You should check the list of exempt countries before you travel. If you travel from an exempt country but have been in a country that is not exempt within the last 14 days, you will need to self-isolate for the remainder of the 14 days since you were last in a non-exempt country.

 

You should follow separate advice if you need to self-isolate in:

Before you travel to the UK from anywhere outside the Common Travel Area, you should provide your journey, contact details and the address where you will self-isolate. You will be able to complete the public health passenger locator form 48 hours before you arrive. You must present these details on your arrival in England.

 

:excl:

You may be refused permission to enter the UK (if you are not a British citizen), or fined if you do not to provide your contact details or do not self-isolate, unless you arrive in the UK from an exempt country.

 

In England, if you do not self-isolate, you can be fined £1,000. If you do not provide an accurate contact detail declaration – or do not update your contact detail form in the limited circumstances where you need to move from the accommodation where you’re self-isolating to another place to continue self-isolating – you can be fined up to £3,200.

 

Who must self-isolate

These rules are for UK residents and all visitors coming into the UK.

 

You will need to complete a public health passenger locator form unless you are travelling within the Common Travel Area, and have been in the Common Travel Area for the past 14 days. If you’ve been outside the Common Travel Area at any time in the last 14 days you will need to complete a public health passenger locator form.

 

You do not need to self-isolate if you’re travelling from an exempt country and have been in an exempt country for the last 14 days. You should check the list of exempt countries before you travel. Exempt countries include all parts of the UK, the Republic of Ireland, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.

 

If you travel from an exempt country but have been in a country that is not exempt within the last 14 days, you will need to self-isolate for the remainder of the 14 days since you were in a non-exempt country. If you transit through a country that is not exempt you will be required to self-isolate for 14 days.

 

For example, if you arrive in the UK from a country that is exempt, but you travelled to the exempt country 4 days ago from a country that is not exempt you will need to self-isolate for 10 days. If you’re travelling to the UK for less than 10 days you will need to self-isolate for the length of your stay.

 

There are other reasons why you might not need to self-isolate. Read the detailed guidance on who does not need to self-isolate.

 

If you are exempt, you will still need to stay alert and stay safe.

 

Why self-isolating is important

When you arrive in the UK, it is very important that you stay in your declared accommodation for 14 days. It can take up to 14 days for you to develop coronavirus symptoms after you catch the virus and in this time you can unknowingly pass it on to others, even if you don’t have symptoms.

 

Self-isolating will reduce the chance of a second wave of coronavirus in the UK and help prevent family, friends and the community from contracting coronavirus, as well as helping to protect the NHS.

 

Arrivals from countries that are exempt from the requirement will not be required to self-isolate, because they’re travelling from places that have been assessed as low risk.

 

How to travel to the place where you are self-isolating

If you develop coronavirus symptoms when you’re travelling to the UK, you should tell one of the crew on your plane, boat, train or bus. They’ll let staff in the airport, port or station know, so they can tell you what you should do next when you arrive.

 

When you arrive in the UK, go straight to the place you’re staying.

 

Only use public transport if you have no other option. If you do use public transport, wear something that covers your nose and mouth and stay 2 metres apart from other people. Pack a face covering or scarf to cover your nose and mouth before you travel. If you have coronavirus symptoms, you will not be allowed to travel by public transport and will need to demonstrate that the accommodation where you will self-isolate is safe.

 

If necessary, and you have a long journey within the UK to arrive at your self-isolation accommodation, you can stop overnight in safe accommodation before continuing your journey. You must self-isolate and provide the address of your overnight stop on your public health passenger locator form in addition to your declared accommodation address.

 

How to self-isolate in your accommodation

You should self-isolate in one place for the full 14 days, where you can have food and other necessities delivered, and stay away from others. You must self-isolate at the address you provided on the public health passenger locator form.

 

This can include:

  • your own home
  • staying with friends or family
  • a hotel or other temporary accommodation

You should not have visitors, including friends and family, unless they are providing:

  • emergency assistance
  • care or assistance, including personal care
  • medical assistance
  • veterinary services
  • certain critical public services

You cannot go out to work or school or visit public areas. You should not go shopping. If you require help buying groceries, other shopping or picking up medication, you should ask friends or relatives or order a delivery.

In England, you must only exercise within your home or garden. You cannot leave your home to walk your dog. You will need to ask friends or relatives to help you with this.

 

NHS Volunteer Responders are also available if you need help collecting shopping, medication or would like a telephone ‘check-in and chat’. Call 0808 196 3646 (8am to 8pm) to arrange volunteer support. You can arrange one-off support, or schedule more regular help whilst you are self-isolating.

 

In England, you can only leave your accommodation in limited circumstances. These include where:

  • you need urgent medical assistance (or where your doctor has advised you to get medical assistance)
  • you need access to basic necessities like food and medicines, but only in exceptional circumstances such as where you cannot arrange for these to be delivered
  • you need to access critical public services such as social services and victim support services, but only in exceptional circumstances
  • you need to go to the funeral of a family member of someone you live with
  • you need to visit a dying or critically ill family member or someone you live with
  • you need to fulfil a legal obligation such as participate in legal proceedings
  • there’s an emergency

You are not allowed to change the place where you are self-isolating except in very limited circumstances, including where:

  • a legal obligation requires you to change address, such as where you are a child whose parents live separately, and you need to move between homes as part of a shared custody agreement
  • it is necessary for you to stay overnight at accommodation before travelling to the place where you will be self-isolating for the remainder of the 14 days
  • there’s an emergency

If this happens, you should provide full details of each address where you will self-isolate on the public health passenger locator form. If, in exceptional circumstances, you cannot remain where you are staying, you must update the form as soon as possible.

 

Support to help you self-isolate in your own accommodation

The people you’re staying with do not need to self-isolate, unless they travelled with you or you develop symptoms of coronavirus.

 

If you cannot safely self-isolate for 14 days, you should tell Border Force Officers when you pass through UK border controls. They will provide you with details of a booking service which you can use to obtain accommodation and self-isolate in at your own expense. Staying at home may be difficult, frustrating or lonely, but there are things that you can do to help make it easier.

 

NHS Volunteer Responders are also on hand to have a friendly chat. If you would like a telephone ‘check in and chat’ please call 0808 196 3646 (8am to 8pm) to arrange volunteer support.

 

Read information on your employment rights on return to the UK following a period of travel.

 

Within your accommodation

The people you’re staying with do not need to stay at home, unless they travelled with you.

 

If you’re staying in a hotel or guest house, you must stay away from others who didn’t travel with you, so it’s important that you don’t use shared areas such as bars, restaurants, health clubs and sports facilities. Stay 2 metres apart from other people staying there at all times.

 

It’s important to avoid as much contact with other people as possible in your home in order to reduce the risk of transmitting coronavirus. You should stay in a well-ventilated room with a window to the outside that can be opened, separate from other people in your home.

 

Washing your hands and keeping good hygiene

Everyone should wash their hands regularly, but this is particularly important for people who have recently travelled to the UK because you could have contracted coronavirus and not yet developed symptoms. Wash your hands frequently with soap and hot water, for at least 20 seconds, rinse and dry thoroughly. Use alcohol-based hand sanitiser if soap and water are not available. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.

 

Cover your mouth and nose with a disposable tissue when you cough or sneeze. Dispose of tissues into a plastic waste bag, and immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, rinse and dry thoroughly.

 

After self-isolating for 14 days

If you do not have any coronavirus symptoms after 14 days, you can stop self-isolating. You will then need to follow the same rules as people who live in the UK. Check the rules for the part of the UK you’re staying in:

What to do if you get coronavirus symptoms

You should look for any of the following symptoms in the 14 days after the day you arrive in the UK:

  • new continuous cough
  • high temperature
  • loss or change to your sense of smell or taste

If you have any of these symptoms, you should continue to self-isolate at home. If you are staying with others and you develop symptoms, the whole household that you are staying with will need to begin self-isolating.

 

You should apply for a test if you have the symptoms of coronavirus. You can register for a test on the NHS website. If you have no internet access, you should call NHS 119 to arrange for a test.

 

If your test for coronavirus is positive you will be asked to share your contacts with the NHS test and trace service, and your contact detail declaration may be used to alert people who travelled to the UK alongside you.

 

If you feel you cannot cope with your symptoms at home, or your condition gets worse, or your symptoms do not get better after 10 days, then use the NHS 111 online coronavirus (COVID-19) service. If you do not have internet access, call NHS 111. For a medical emergency dial 999.

 

If you develop symptoms, you must self-isolate for at least 14 days from the point you arrived in the UK and if you get symptoms during that time for at least 10 days from symptom onset and until you are better and no longer have a high temperature. You will need to self-isolate for 14 days from the time that you arrived in the UK even if you have had and recovered from coronavirus symptoms in this time. If you are tested and receive a negative result for coronavirus, you must continue to self-isolate until you have been in the UK for 14 days, even if your symptoms have gone.

 

If you arrived in the UK more than 14 days ago, you do not need to continue self-isolation once you have had symptoms for 10 days and your temperature has returned to normal. Symptoms of a cough or changes to your sense of smell or taste can last for several weeks after the infection has gone and so you can stop self-isolating even if you have these symptoms. The household you are staying with should self-isolate for 14 days from the point that your symptoms start.

 

If you develop new symptoms or your existing symptoms worsen within your 14-day isolation period, then please contact NHS 111 again and follow their advice.

 

image.png

 

Exemptions

A small proportion of people travelling to the UK to maintain essential supply chains, critical national infrastructure or to contribute to crisis response or other essential government work will not need to self-isolate and some will not need to complete the public health passenger locator form.

 

People travelling from exempt countries will also not need to self-isolate, if they have been in an exempt country for 14 days.

 

If you are a seasonal agricultural worker, you must complete the public health passenger locator form and remain on the farm where you are working and staying for 14 days.

 

Read the list of exemptions to self-isolation requirements.

 

Like everyone in the UK, if you are exempt you should not travel and should immediately self-isolate if you get the symptoms of coronavirus. You should follow guidance to stay alert and work safely.

 

Updated 17 August 2020

Link to source data

See also here

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Press release

Government creates new National Institute for Health Protection

A brand new organisation whose primary focus is public health protection and infectious disease capability is being established by the government.

  • New organisation to focus on rigorous science-led approach to public health protection
  • Institute will boost UK’s ability to deal with and recover from COVID-19 and meet health challenges of the coming winter
  • The organisation will be formalised and be operating from spring 2021

The National Institute for Health Protection (NIHP) will start work immediately, with a single command structure to advance the country’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

From today it will bring together Public Health England (PHE) and NHS Test and Trace, as well as the analytical capability of the Joint Biosecurity Centre (JBC) under a single leadership team. This is the first step towards becoming a single organisation, focused on tackling COVID-19 and protecting the nation’s health.

In order to minimise disruption to the vital work dealing with the pandemic, the organisation will be formalised and operating from spring 2021.

The new organisation will support local directors of public health and local authorities on the frontline of the COVID-19 response.

 

The responsibilities of the NIHP will include:

  • NIHP local health protection teams to deal with infections and other threats
  • support and resources for local authorities to manage local outbreaks
  • the COVID-19 testing programme
  • contact tracing
  • the Joint Biosecurity Centre
  • emergency response and preparedness to deal with the most severe incidents at national and local level
  • research and reference laboratories and associated services
  • specialist epidemiology and surveillance of all infectious diseases
  • the Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards
  • global health security
  • providing specialistic scientific advice on immunisation and countermeasures

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said:

"To give ourselves the best chance of beating this virus once and for all – and of spotting and being ready to respond to other health threats, now and in the future – we are creating a brand new organisation to provide a new approach to public health protection and resilience."

"The National Institute for Health Protection will bring together the expertise of PHE with the enormous response capabilities of NHS Test and Trace and the Joint Biosecurity Centre to put us in the best possible position for the next stage of the fight against COVID-19 and for the long term."

"I want to thank all my brilliant colleagues at Public Health England, the NHS, the Joint Biosecurity Centre, local directors of public health and their teams, contact tracers, diagnostics experts, epidemiologists, infection control teams, and every single person who has contributed to the national effort to get this deadly pandemic under control over the last 8 months."

"I would like to personally thank Duncan Selbie for his leadership of PHE bringing together 70 different agencies, pursuing ground-breaking work on tackling obesity, promoting health improvement and leading PHE, in what has been an exceptionally challenging time. I am looking forward to continuing working with him as a leading figure in the global, public health agenda."

 

The NIHP will be a new organisation whose primary focus is to ensure we have the best capability to control infectious disease and deal with pandemics or health protection crises. It will take on existing UK-wide responsibilities and it will work with local government, the NHS and the devolved administrations to ensure we have the strongest possible health protection system for the whole of the UK. It will build on the existing strong working relationships between the 4 nations of the UK, including on data-sharing, alert levels and border issues.

 

It will report directly to the Health and Care Secretary and support the clinical leadership of the 4 UK chief medical officers.

 

The government is immediately bringing together PHE, NHS Test and Trace and the Joint Biosecurity Centre under the interim leadership of Baroness Dido Harding, with a single command structure and operating model to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

This builds on the joint work already being done by PHE and NHS Test and Trace, including the JBC, in response to COVID-19.

 

It will ensure the UK will be in an even stronger position to deal with and further recover from COVID-19, the strongest possible position to meet the health protection challenges over the coming winter and be more resilient to respond to future pandemics.

 

Baroness Dido Harding, Interim Executive Chair of the National Institute for Health Protection, said:

"Combining the UK’s world-class public health talent and infrastructure with the new at-scale response capability of NHS Test and Trace into a single organisation puts us in the strongest position to stop the spread of the virus."

"The fantastic teams in PHE, NHS Test and Trace and in local authorities have done so much over the past 8 months, and I thank them all for their service now and in the future."

"PHE has worked incredibly well with NHS Test and Trace, and with winter ahead, the life-saving work we are doing is more important than ever."

"The changes announced today are designed to strengthen our response, and to radically ramp up our fight against this disease, whilst also protecting PHE’s essential work beyond COVID that is so important for the nation’s health."

 

Supporting Baroness Harding in her role will be Michael Brodie, who has been appointed Interim Chief Executive Officer of PHE. Michael is currently CEO of the NHS Business Services Authority.

 

Duncan Selbie, the outgoing PHE Chief Executive, will be taking on a role as a senior advisor to the Department of Health and Social Care on global and public health.

 

The NIHP will seek to learn from the best systems around the world and work with local directors of public health and their teams, to use their crucial insight and intelligence to deliver a world-class service.

 

Preventing ill health and reducing health inequalities also remains a top priority. Over the coming weeks and months, the DHSC and PHE experts will engage on future options on decisions around the future of PHE’s remaining health improvement functions, including how to support a successful wider public health system to ensure we have the best possible capability and capacity to support people to improve their health.

 

The DHSC will establish a new Stakeholder Advisory Group to provide expert advice from leading thinkers in public health, health care and local government.

 

Duncan Selbie, outgoing PHE Chief Executive, said:

"I could not be any prouder of what PHE has achieved since 2013 in protecting the country from infectious diseases and environmental hazards and in improving the health of the people from reduced smoking rates to tackling poor air quality and obesity and much else."

"PHE’s work on the pandemic in the early stages and since stands testament to the professionalism and unremitting hard work of my colleagues and bought precious time for the NHS and government to prepare."

"It has been the honour and privilege of my career to lead PHE."

 

Published 18 August 2020

Link to source data

 

See also 

Speech

The future of public health

Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock spoke at Policy Exchange about the future of public health.

Published 18 August 2020

Link to source

 

And

Press release

Huge boost to national testing study will offer new COVID-19 insights

Infection survey to expand from testing 28,000 people per fortnight to 150,000 by October.

  • Office for National Statistics to significantly expand infection survey to 400,000 people in England, making it the country’s largest study tracking COVID-19 in the general population
  • New data will support rapid testing and diagnosis of COVID-19 on a national and local level, helping to narrow down the areas of concern
  • Government to provide £2 million grant to ZOE COVID-19 Symptom Study app to support its ongoing data collection

The ONS COVID-19 Infection Survey tracking the virus in the general population will expand from regularly testing 28,000 people per fortnight in England to 150,000 by October, the Health Secretary announces today. The survey aims to increase to 400,000 people across the entire project in England.

 

Published 19 August 2020

Link to source

 

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Updates to the travel corridor list

 

Countries removed from the travel corridor list

 

The following countries were removed from the travel corridor list at 4am, Saturday 22 August 2020:

If you arrive in England from Austria, Croatia or Trinidad and Tobago after 4am 22 August, you will need to self-isolate.

 

The following countries and territories were removed from the travel corridor list at 4am, Saturday 15 August 2020:

  • Aruba
  • France
  • Malta
  • Monaco
  • the Netherlands
  • Turks and Caicos Islands

If you arrive in England from Aruba, France, Malta, Monaco, the Netherlands or Turks and Caicos Islands after 4am 15 August, you will need to self-isolate.

 

The following countries were removed from the travel corridor list at 4am, Saturday 8 August 2020:

  • Andorra
  • The Bahamas
  • Belgium

If you arrive in England from Andorra, The Bahamas or Belgium after 4am 8 August you will need to self-isolate.

 

 

Countries or territories added to the travel corridor list

 

Portugal was added to the travel corridor list at 4am, Saturday 22 August 2020.

If you arrive in England from Portugal after 4am 22 August you may not need to self-isolate. Read the rules about when you need to self-isolate and for how long.

If you arrived in England from Portugal before 4am 22 August, you will need to Self-isolate.

 

The following countries were added to the travel corridor list at 4am on Tuesday 11 August 2020:

  • Brunei
  • Malaysia

If you arrive in England from Brunei or Malaysia after 4am 11 August you may not need to self-isolate. Read the rules about when you need to self-isolate and for how long.

If you arrived in England from Brunei or Malaysia before 4am 11 August, you will need to self-isolate.

 

 

Countries and territories with no self-isolation requirement on arrival in England

 

You may not have to self-isolate if you are travelling from one of the countries or territories listed below.

You will need to self-isolate if you visited or made a transit stop in a country or territory that is not on the list in the 14 days before you arrive in England.

  • Akrotiri and Dhekelia
  • Anguilla
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Barbados
  • Bermuda
  • Bonaire, St Eustatius and Saba
  • British Antarctic Territory
  • British Indian Ocean Territory
  • British Virgin Islands
  • Brunei (added 11 August 2020 – if you arrived in England from Brunei before 11 August, you will need to self–isolate)
  • Cayman Islands
  • the Channel Islands
  • Curaçao
  • Cyprus
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Dominica
  • Estonia
  • Falkland Islands
  • Faroe Islands
  • Fiji
  • Finland
  • French Polynesia
  • Gibraltar
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Greenland
  • Grenada
  • Guadeloupe
  • Hong Kong
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • the Isle of Man
  • Italy
  • Jamaica
  • Japan
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Macao (Macau)
  • Malaysia (added 11 August 2020 – if you arrived in England from Malaysia before 11 August, you will need to self–isolate)
  • Mauritius
  • Montserrat
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • Norway
  • Pitcairn, Henderson, Ducie and Oeno Islands
  • Poland
  • Portugal (added 4am, Saturday 22 August 2020 – if you arrived in England from Portugal before 4am, 22 August, you will need to self–isolate)
  • Reunion
  • San Marino
  • Seychelles
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • South Korea
  • South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
  • St Barthélemy
  • St Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Pierre and Miquelon
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Switzerland
  • Taiwan
  • Turkey
  • Vatican City State
  • Vietnam

If you have coronavirus symptoms

Do not travel if you have coronavirus symptoms

Tell a member of the staff or crew if you develop symptoms while travelling

 

Published 22 August 2020

Link to source

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Unity and division in Great Britain: 24 April to 28 June 2020

Has the COVID-19 pandemic situation changed people's perception?

 

The effect of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on perceptions of unity and division in Great Britain, using the weekly Opinions and Lifestyle Survey (OPN). Includes an assessment of unity and division over time and across numerous socioeconomic divides, such as age, sex and perceptions of community.

 

Main points

  • Over the period as a whole, from 24 April to 28 June 2020, more adults on average thought that Britain will be united after we have recovered from the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic (46%) than thought that we were united before the pandemic (24%).
  • In this same period, adults in Scotland were less likely (31%) to say that Britain will be united after the pandemic than those in either England (47%) or Wales (44%).
  • Although women were as likely as men to say that Britain was united before the pandemic, they were more likely than men to think that Britain will be united after it, with half (50%) saying that Britain would be either very or somewhat united compared with 41% of men.
  • Perceptions of unity within Britain are associated with higher average life satisfaction, happiness and feelings that things done in life are worthwhile as well as with checking on neighbours, feeling like the community is available to support you and thinking people are doing more to help others.
  • As time progressed through the period, the percentage of adults who thought that Britain would be more united after the pandemic declined by 29 percentage points (from 57% in the first week of the period to 28% in the last week) so that by the end of this period, there was no difference in the percentage of people who thought that Britain would be united before the pandemic compared with those who thought it would be united after.
  • Similarly, as time progressed through the period, there was only a small difference in the proportion of the population who thought that Britain would be equal after the pandemic (22%) compared with those who thought it was equal before (19%).
  • Although perceptions of how kind people in Britain will be after we recover from the coronavirus pandemic declined from 67% at the start of the period to 56% at the end of the period, by the end there were still more people who thought that people in Britain would be kind after the pandemic than thought that people were kind before it (46%).

See full results of the survey here

Published 25 August 2020

From: Office for National Statistics

 

 

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Press release

New payment for people self-isolating in highest risk areas

 

People on low incomes who need to self-isolate and are unable to work from home in areas with high incidence of COVID-19 will benefit from a new payment scheme.

  • Government to implement new payment for people on low incomes in areas with high rates of COVID-19, who need to self-isolate and can’t work from home
  • Payments of up to £182 to be made to people who have tested positive for COVID-19 and their contacts
  • Scheme to start first in Blackburn with Darwen, Pendle, and Oldham

People on low incomes who need to self-isolate and are unable to work from home in areas with high incidence of COVID-19 will benefit from a new payment scheme starting on Tuesday 1 September, the Health Secretary has announced today.

 

Starting with a trial in Blackburn with Darwen, Pendle and Oldham to ensure the process works, eligible individuals who test positive with the virus will receive £130 for their 10-day period of self-isolation. Other members of their household, who have to self-isolate for 14 days, will be entitled to a payment of £182.

 

Non-household contacts advised to self-isolate through NHS Test and Trace will also be entitled to a payment of up to £182, tailored to the individual length of their isolation period.

 

It is designed to support people who are unable to work from home while self-isolating, either after testing positive, or after being identified by NHS Test and Trace as living in the same household as – or coming into contact with – someone who has tested positive. It will be available to people currently receiving either Universal Credit or Working Tax Credit.

 

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said:

"The British public have already sacrificed a great deal to help slow the spread of the virus. Self-isolating if you have tested positive for COVID-19, or have come into contact with someone who has, remains vital to keeping on top of local outbreaks."

 

"This new payment scheme will help people on low incomes and who are unable to work from home to continue playing their part in the national fight against this virus."

 

Payments will be provided within 48 hours of the eligible individual providing the necessary evidence. Individuals will be asked to provide a notification from NHS Test and Trace and a bank statement.

 

The local authority can also check the NHS Test and Trace system to confirm the individual has been asked to self-isolate, if the individual is unable to provide this information. The local authority will put in place checks to prevent fraud and ensure compliance through welfare check-ins, phone calls and employment checks.

 

There will be a rapid review of the scheme in Blackburn with Darwen, Pendle and Oldham to assess the performance consider how effectively vulnerable people have been reached, and consider how far it has helped reduce transmission of the virus in these areas. If the approach is successful, the scheme will be quickly applied in other areas of high COVID-19 incidence.

 

Background information

This will not reduce any other benefits that they receive. This payment equates to:-

  • £130 if an individual has tested positive for coronavirus and has to self-isolate for 10 days (from the point they first developed symptoms).
  • £182 if a member of an individual’s household has tested positive for coronavirus and they are asked to self-isolate for 14 days (from the point the member of their household first developed symptoms).
  • £13 per day (up to a maximum of £182) if an individual is identified as a non-household contact of another person who has tested positive for coronavirus and is asked to self-isolate up until 14 days after they were most recently in contact with the person who tested positive.

To be eligible for the funding, individuals must meet the following criteria:

  • Have tested positive for Covid-19 or received a notification from NHS Test and Trace asking them to self-isolate
  • Have agreed to comply with the notification from NHS Test and Trace and provided contact details to the local authority.
  • Be employed or self-employed. Employed people will be asked to show proof of employment. Self-employed will be required to show evidence of trading income and that their business delivers services which the local authority reasonably judges they are unable to carry out without social contact
  • Be unable to work from home (checks will be undertaken on all applicants) and will lose income a result
  • Be currently receiving Universal Credit or Working Tax Credit

 

Published 27 August 2020

From: Department of Health and Social Care

Link to source

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): travel corridors

List of countries and territories from where you can travel to England and may not have to self-isolate.

 

The following countries were removed from the exempt list at 4am, Saturday, 29 August 2020:

  • Czech Republic
  • Jamaica
  • Switzerland

If you arrive in England from the Czech Republic, Jamaica or Switzerland after 4am 29 August 2020, you will need to self-isolate.

 

The following countries were removed from the travel corridor list at 4am, Saturday 22 August 2020:

  • Austria
  • Croatia
  • Trinidad and Tobago

If you arrive in England from Austria, Croatia or Trinidad and Tobago after 4am 22 August, you will need to self-isolate.

 

The following country was added to the exempt list at 4am, Saturday, 29 August 2020:

  • Cuba

If you arrive in England from Cuba after 4am 29 August 2020 you may not need to self-isolate. Read the rules about when you need to self-isolate and for how long.

 

The following country was added to the exempt list at 4am, Saturday, 22 August 2020:

  • Portugal

If you arrive in England from Portugal after 4am 22 August you may not need to self-isolate. Read the rules about when you need to self-isolate and for how long.

 

Countries and territories with no self-isolation requirement on arrival in England:

You may not have to self-isolate if you are travelling from one of the countries or territories listed below.

You will need to self-isolate if you visited or made a transit stop in a country or territory that is not on the list in the 14 days before you arrive in England.

  • Akrotiri and Dhekelia
  • Anguilla
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Barbados
  • Bermuda
  • Bonaire, St Eustatius and Saba
  • British Antarctic Territory
  • British Indian Ocean Territory
  • British Virgin Islands
  • Brunei
  • Cayman Islands
  • the Channel Islands
  • Cuba (added 4am, 29 August 2020 – if you arrived in England from Cuba before 4am 29 August you will need to self-isolate)
  • Curaçao
  • Cyprus
  • Denmark
  • Dominica
  • Estonia
  • Falkland Islands
  • Faroe Islands
  • Fiji
  • Finland
  • French Polynesia
  • Gibraltar
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Greenland
  • Grenada
  • Guadeloupe
  • Hong Kong
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • the Isle of Man
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Macao (Macau)
  • Malaysia
  • Mauritius
  • Montserrat
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • Norway
  • Pitcairn, Henderson, Ducie and Oeno Islands
  • Poland
  • Portugal (added 4am, Saturday 22 August 2020 – if you arrived in England from Portugal before 4am, 22 August, you will need to self–isolate)
  • Reunion
  • San Marino
  • Seychelles
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • South Korea
  • South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
  • St Barthélemy
  • St Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Pierre and Miquelon
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Taiwan
  • Turkey
  • Vatican City State
  • Vietnam

Updated 29 August 2020 

Link to source data

__________________________________________________________

Last updated 3 September 2020 

News story

No changes to travel corridor list

 

  • no countries removed or added to the list of travel corridors for England today
  • all travellers urged to check the latest advice from the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) before travelling and will be required to fill in a passenger locator form before returning home
  • the government will not hesitate to remove countries from the travel corridors list rapidly if the public health risk becomes too high

Link to source data

__________________________________________________________

 

Press release

Restrictions lifted in parts of Greater Manchester, Lancashire and West Yorkshire

Locally led approach seeing results as COVID-19 cases drop in some hotspot areas in northern England.

  • Positive progress means 2 households can mix again in areas including Bolton, Stockport, Trafford, Hyndburn and Burnley
  • Some improvements in Leicester, with current restrictions remaining in place for a further 2 weeks as cases remain high

Following discussions with local leaders, the Health and Social Care Secretary, NHS Test and Trace, the Joint Biosecurity Centre (JBC), and the Chief Medical Officer for England have agreed this week’s changes to local restrictions in some parts of England.

From Wednesday 2 September restrictions on 2 households mixing introduced last month will be lifted in:

  • Bolton
  • Stockport
  • Trafford
  • Burnley
  • Hyndburn
  • parts of Bradford excluding Bradford city and Keighley town
  • parts of Calderdale excluding Halifax
  • parts of Kirklees excluding Dewsbury and Batley

Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said:

"We brought in measures to protect people in these parts of Northern England, and I want to thank residents who have worked so hard to get on top of this virus."

"We’re seeing the positive results of our local approach, and are able to bring in increasingly targeted measures."

"It is vital we can maintain this good progress. I have every faith people across the county, especially in areas where we are seeing higher numbers of cases, will continue to play their part by following local rules, and self-isolating and requesting a free test as soon as they get any symptoms."

 

 

The weekly Local Action Gold Committee, chaired by the Health and Social Care Secretary, agreed local restrictions will continue in the following areas.

 

Greater Manchester:

  • a ban on 2 households mixing indoors will continue in City of Manchester, Salford, Rochdale, Bury and Tameside
  • in Oldham, in addition to a household mixing ban indoors, residents will continue to be advised to avoid mixing with anyone from anther household anywhere. Cases per 100,000 in Oldham reached 67.1 during the week ending 20 August, the second highest in England

Lancashire:

  • in Pendle and Blackburn residents will continue to be advised to avoid mixing with anyone from another household anywhere. Some businesses and organisations remain closed in Blackburn and Darwen. Pendle had the highest number of cases per 100,000 anywhere in England during the week ending 20 August, reaching 67.8
  • the ban on 2 households mixing indoors will continue in Preston

Leicester:

  • on top of the indoor gatherings restrictions, some leisure sector businesses will continue to remain closed
  • the next review of these measures will take place by 11 September

West Yorkshire:

  • in urban areas of Bradford, the ban on indoor household gatherings remains in place and some businesses and organisations remain closed
  • in Kirklees, the ban on indoor household gatherings will continue in Dewsbury and Batley
  • the ban will also continue in parts of Calderdale

Shielding advice for clinical extremely vulnerable individuals remains in place across all of Blackburn with Darwen, and Leicester.

 

Background information

The full changes will be published on GOV.UK at Local restrictions: areas with an outbreak of coronavirus (COVID-19).

PHE’s weekly surveillance report includes changes to the watchlist of local authority areas with higher-than-average incidences of COVID-19.

 

The changes are:

  • Sandwell and Swindon move up the list and become ‘areas of enhanced support’
  • Luton becomes an ‘area of concern’ following a drop in cases
  • Trafford, Bolton, Stockport, Burnley, Hyndburn, Burnley, parts of Bradford, parts of Kirklees and parts of Calderdale are moved down the list, becoming areas of ‘enhanced support’
  • Stoke-on-Trent is being added to the list for the first time as an ‘area of concern’

This week’s PHE surveillance report also included data on rates of COVID-19 by ethnicity and age in each major region in England. This will allow the public and local leaders to more easily see how the pandemic is affecting different ethnic groups across the country, and to inform action to protect our most vulnerable communities

The 3 definitions for JBC and PHE’s watchlist are ‘areas of concern’, ‘areas of enhanced support’ and ‘areas of intervention’:

  • for ‘areas of concern’, upper tier local authorities will work with partners, supported by regional PHE and NHS Test and Trace resource, to take additional actions to manage outbreaks and reduce community spread of the virus to more normal levels. Actions taken may include additional targeted testing at high-risk areas or groups, for example care homes, enhanced communications around the importance of social distancing, hand hygiene and other preventative measures, and more detailed epidemiological work to understand where clusters of the virus are occurring so that appropriate action can be taken
  • areas deemed for ‘enhanced support’ will be provided with increased national support, capacity and oversight, including additional resources deployed to augment the local teams where this is necessary. Actions taken may include significant additional widespread testing deployed to the upper tier local authorities, national support for local recommendations put in place to manage outbreaks, and detailed engagement with high-risk groups and sectors to help increase the effectiveness of testing and tracing in these areas
  • ‘areas of intervention’ are defined where there is divergence from the lockdown measures in place in the rest of England because of the significance of the spread of COVID-19. There are a range of non-pharmaceutical interventions available to local and national leaders, from extensive communications and expanded testing, to restrictions on businesses and gatherings

Area-specific changes

 

Areas in Bradford where restrictions are being lifted:

  • Worth Valley
  • Craven
  • Ilkley
  • Baildon
  • Bingley
  • Bingley Rural
  • Shipley
  • Wharfedale
  • Windhill and Wrose

Areas in Calderdale where restrictions are being lifted:

  • Brighouse
  • Calder
  • Elland
  • Greenland and Stainland
  • Hipperholme and Lightcliffe
  • Luddendenfoot
  • Rastrick
  • Ryburn
  • Todmorden

Areas in Kirklees where restrictions are being lifted:

  • Golcar
  • Greenhead
  • Heckmondwike
  • Holme Valley South
  • Lindley
  • Liversedge and Gomersal
  • Mirfield
  • Newsome
  • Cleckheaton
  • Dalton
  • Denby Dale
  • Almondbury
  • Colne Valley
  • Crosland Moor and Netherton
  • Holme Valley North
  • Kirkburton
  • Ashbrow
  • Birstall and Birkenshaw

 

Published 28 August 2020
Link to source

__________________________________________________________

 

Guidance

The R number and growth rate in the UK

The latest reproduction number (R) and growth rate of coronavirus (COVID-19) in the UK.

 

Latest R number range for the UK

0.9-1.1

Latest growth rate range for the UK

-2% to +1%

 

Latest for devolved administrations

The latest ranges for values in the devolved administrations are published on their respective websites:

 

Last updated 28 August 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

 

Contracts that cannot go ahead due to lockdown laws

In some circumstances, due to lockdown laws, a contract cannot go ahead as agreed or at all, and is therefore ‘frustrated’. A contract will be frustrated as a matter of law if, due to no fault of the parties, something happens after the contract was entered into which means it can no longer be performed at all or performance would be radically different to what was agreed.

 

As a result, the contract comes to an end and, where consumers have paid money in advance for services or goods that they have yet to receive, they will generally be entitled to obtain a refund.

They will also not be required to make further payments.

 

In particular, for most consumer contracts, the CMA would expect a consumer to be offered a full refund where:

  • a business has cancelled a contract without providing any of the promised goods or services
  • no goods or services are provided by a business because this is prevented by the lockdown laws
  • a consumer is prevented from receiving any goods or services, because, for example, lockdown laws in the UK or abroad have made it illegal to receive or use the goods or services

In most cases, consumers will contact a business to ask for their money back, but there is no requirement for consumers formally to communicate with a business before becoming entitled to a refund.

 

Examples of legal restrictions in lockdown laws include:

  • restrictions imposed under the original lockdown laws in the early stages of the pandemic
  • restrictions imposed by local lockdown laws
  • specific restrictions imposed by local authorities under their legal lockdown powers
  • mandatory self-isolation following a direction from a public health officer
  • mandatory self-isolation when returning to the UK from certain countries which may affect the consumer’s ability to use a service during the self-isolation period (provided that the requirement to self-isolate was imposed after the consumer had entered into the relevant contract and was not reasonably anticipated by the consumer)

 

If laws in another country prevent a business from providing a service under a contract with a UK consumer or prevent that consumer from receiving the service, then in most cases consumers will also be entitled to a refund.

 

Businesses should not require consumers to take unreasonable or unnecessary steps in order to obtain refunds. A business imposing such barriers may breach consumer protection law by doing so.

 

Non-refundable payments and fees:

In the CMA’s view, for consumer contracts the above rights to a refund will usually apply even where the business says part of the payment is a non-refundable deposit or advance payment.

 

This is because the contract will have been frustrated and terms which allow a business to provide no service but keep a consumer’s money (including deposits or advance payments) are likely to be unfair, and therefore unenforceable under Part 2 of the Consumer Rights Act 2015.

 

Last updated 28 August 2020

Link to source

 

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The R number and growth rate in the UK

 

Latest by NHS England regions

image.png

 

Latest for devolved administrations

The latest ranges for values in the devolved administrations are published on their respective websites:

Northern Ireland R number

Scotland R number

Wales R number  (Cymraeg)

 

Published 15 May 2020
Last updated 4 September 2020

Link to source data

__________________________________________________________

Press release

Government delivers 250,000 clear face masks to support people with hearing loss

250,000 clear face masks are to be delivered to frontline NHS and social care workers to support better care for people who use lip-reading and facial expressions to communicate.

 

NHS and care workers will be given clear face masks to help them communicate with people with certain conditions like hearing loss, autism and dementia, the government has announced.

 

The masks are see-through and have an anti-fogging barrier to ensure the face and mouth are always visible to help doctors, nurses and carers communicate better with their patients.

 

With around 12 million people in the UK thought to have hearing loss, the masks will be invaluable for people who need to lip-read to communicate during the ongoing response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and beyond.

The masks will also help those who rely on facial expressions to support communication. For example, people with learning disabilities, autism or dementia, or foreign language speakers and their interpreters.

 

The new deal with US-based company ClearMask will see 250,000 masks delivered to NHS trusts and social care providers across the UK over the next few weeks.

 

https://www.theclearmask.com

 

Published 5 September 2020

Link to source data

 

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Countries and territories with no self-isolation requirement on arrival in England

updated 7 September 2020

 

You may not have to self-isolate if you are travelling from one of the countries or territories listed below. You will still need to complete the passenger locator form before you enter the UK.

 

You will need to self-isolate if you visited or made a transit stop in a country or territory that is not on the list in the 14 days before you arrive in England.

  • Akrotiri and Dhekelia
  • Anguilla
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Barbados
  • Bermuda
  • Bonaire, St Eustatius and Saba
  • British Antarctic Territory
  • British Indian Ocean Territory
  • British Virgin Islands
  • Brunei
  • Cayman Islands
  • the Channel Islands
  • Cuba
  • Curaçao
  • Cyprus
  • Denmark
  • Dominica
  • Estonia
  • Falkland Islands
  • Faroe Islands
  • Fiji
  • Finland
  • French Polynesia
  • Gibraltar
  • Germany
  • Greece (the Greek islands Crete, Lesvos, Mykonos, Santorini, Serifos, Tinos and Zakynthos will be removed from this list 4am Wednesday 9 September 2020)
  • Greenland
  • Grenada
  • Guadeloupe
  • Hong Kong
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • the Isle of Man
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Macao (Macau)
  • Malaysia
  • Mauritius
  • Montserrat
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • Norway
  • Pitcairn, Henderson, Ducie and Oeno Islands
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Reunion
  • San Marino
  • Seychelles
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • South Korea
  • South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
  • St Barthélemy
  • St Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Pierre and Miquelon
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Taiwan
  • Turkey
  • Vatican City State
  • Vietnam

 

Countries, territories or regions removed from the travel corridor list

 

  • Czech Republic
  • Jamaica
  • Switzerland
  • Crete
  • Lesvos
  • Mykonos
  • Santorini
  • Serifos
  • Tinos
  • Zakynthos

Countries or territories added to the travel corridor list

  • Cuba

 

Last updated 7 September 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

Oral statement to Parliament on international travel corridors

Published 7 September 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

Guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): travel corridors

Last updated 11 September 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

Guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): travel corridors

Last updated 17 September 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

Guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): travel corridors

Last updated 24 September 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

Guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): travel corridors

Last updated 3 October 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

 

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

News story

Coronavirus (COVID-19): What has changed – 9 September

The government has announced new measures to suppress the virus and keep the number of infections down.

 

The government has a plan to control the virus and protect the public, as well as keeping the economy and society open. That plan is working: with great collective effort, we have reduced infections significantly from its peak, and enabled the return of more normality to our lives. This is not the time for complacency; we have seen big increases in the spread of the virus in Europe and other countries. With cases increasing in the UK, we all – businesses, individuals, and government – need to take action to suppress the virus.

 

It is critical that everybody observes the following key behaviours:

  • HANDS – Wash your hands regularly and for 20 seconds.
  • FACE – Wear a face covering in indoor settings where social distancing may be difficult and where you will come into contact with people you do not normally meet.
  • SPACE – Stay 2 metres apart from people you do not live with where possible, or 1 metre with extra precautions in place.

The government has announced new measures to suppress the virus and keep the number of infections down:

  • From Monday 14 September, you must not meet with people from other households socially in groups of more than 6. This will apply indoors and outdoors, including in private homes. This change will simplify and clarify the rules on social gatherings, so they are easier to understand and easier for the police to enforce. There will be a limited number of exemptions. COVID-19 Secure venues, such as places of worship, restaurants and hospitality venues, can still host larger numbers in total but groups of up to 6 must not mix or form larger groups. This rule will not apply to individual households or support bubbles of more than 6 who will still be able to gather together. Education and work settings are unaffected, and organised team sports will still be able to proceed, as will weddings and funerals up to 30. From Monday, this limit will be enforceable in law.
  • Businesses will have a clear duty to support NHS Test and Trace. From 18 September, it will be mandatory for certain businesses to have a system to collect NHS Test and Trace data, and keep this for 21 days. Core COVID-19 Secure requirements will be mandated for hospitality businesses, and egregious breaches enforced. The government has also published simplified COVID-19 Secure guidance, available here.
  • The government will support Local Authorities and police forces to respond to breaches of COVID-19 Secure guidelines. We will launch a register of newly qualified and recently retired Environmental Health Officers (EHOs) so that Local Authorities can recruit more quickly and fill any gaps. In addition, we will introduce COVID-19 Secure Marshals to help local authorities support social distancing in towns and city centres.
  • The government will take steps to improve compliance with border requirements. We will simplify the Passenger Locator Form needed for travelling to the UK, and take measures to ensure passengers have filled out their form before departure. Border Force will step up and target their enforcement efforts at the border to ensure arrivals are complying with the rules.
  • The government will review plans to pilot larger audiences in venues this month. Planned sports pilot events will be limited to smaller, safer numbers, with strict conditions to ensure social distancing, and will not take place in areas where incidence is high. We will review our intention to return audiences to stadia and conference centres from 1 October.
  • The government will restrict the opening hours of premises, initially in local lockdown areas, with the option of national action in the future. This has been introduced in Bolton, following a steep rise in cases, and will seek to restrict activities that may lead to a spread in the virus.

These measures apply to England – but there may be different rules if you live in an area under local lockdown and you should check those rules here. If you are in WalesScotland and Northern Ireland, different rules may apply.

 

Published 9 September 2020 

From: Cabinet Office

Link to source data

__________________________________________________________

Press release

New campaign to prevent spread of coronavirus indoors this winter

 

The ‘Hands. Face. Space’ public information campaign urges the public to continue to wash their hands, cover their face and make space to control infection rates and avoid a second peak.

 

  • The spread of coronavirus, particularly in enclosed spaces is shown in a new film, produced with experts in the field, which highlights the risk in simple, everyday interactions
  • The campaign will run across TV, radio, print, out of home, social and digital display advertising

A new science based public information campaign will be launched ahead of winter to highlight how everyone can help to stop the spread of the virus by remembering to wash their hands, cover their face and make space.

 

‘Hands. Face. Space’ will run across TV, radio, print, out of home, social and digital display advertising, as well as on community media channels and will be supported by a variety of public and private sector partners throughout the coming weeks.

 

As part of this campaign, a new video is being released to show exactly how coronavirus spreads indoors. With people expected to spend more time inside during the winter, the film – produced with the help of scientific experts – encourages the public to follow simple steps to reduce the risk of infection.

 

Through a scientifically based reconstruction of everyday scenarios the film shows how the interactions between people, surfaces and the air spread the virus. The film also reflects how coronavirus spreads through droplets that come out of our nose and mouth. This is a powerful reminder to the public of the importance of remaining aware of their surroundings and following the guidance.

 

Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty said:

"As we approach winter and inevitably spend more time indoors, we need the public to keep following this important advice to control the spread of the virus."

"Hands. Face. Space’ emphasises important elements of the guidance we want everybody to remember: wash your hands regularly, use a face covering when social distancing is not possible and try to keep your distance from those not in your household."

"Following these simple steps could make a significant difference in reducing the transmission of COVID-19 and help protect you and your friends, colleagues and family from the virus."

 

The compelling evidence combined with expert recommendations around ‘Hands. Face. Space’ includes:

 

Washing your hands

While coronavirus is not likely to survive for long periods of time on outdoor surfaces in sunlight, it can live for more than 24 hours in indoor environments (see endnote 1). Washing your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, or using hand sanitizer, regularly throughout the day will reduce the risk of catching or passing on the virus (see endnote 2).

 

Covering your face

Coronavirus is carried in the air by tiny respiratory droplets that carry the virus. Larger droplets can land on other people or on surfaces they touch while smaller droplets, called aerosols, can stay in the air indoors for at least 5 minutes, and often much longer if there is no ventilation (see endnote 3). Face coverings reduce the dispersion of these droplets, meaning if you’re carrying the virus you’re less likely to spread it when you exhale (see endnote 4).

 

Making space

Transmission of the virus is most likely to happen within 2 metres, with risk increasing exponentially at shorter distances (see endnote 5). While keeping this exact distance isn’t always possible, remaining mindful of surroundings and continuing to make space has a powerful impact when it comes to containing the spread.

 

While coronavirus deaths have significantly reduced, the virus is still circulating in communities and impacting people of all ages across the UK. ‘Hands. Face. Space’ are simple but vital behaviours that have the power to protect the public from both the short and potential long-term impact of coronavirus.

 

Professor Catherine Noakes, part of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) who specialises in airborne infections said:

"Coronavirus is emitted in tiny droplets when we breathe, talk, laugh or cough. Other people can be exposed to these when they are close to someone with the virus or they are in a poorly ventilated room for a long time."

"Wearing a face covering prevents most of these droplets from being released into the air, and can also reduce the number of droplets that you are exposed to. That is why wearing a face covering serves as a vital first line of defence against catching and spreading the virus, along with regular and thorough handwashing with soap and water and maintaining a safe distance wherever possible."

 

Poppy, 27 from London and suffering from long-term COVID-19 symptoms:

"There is a worrying trend at the moment for people who don’t consider themselves as being at a high-risk group to be dismissive of how the virus may impact them. Before having coronavirus, I was fit and healthy. Now 6 months after supposedly recovering, I’m still dealing with the aftermath of the virus which affects my everyday life. You really don’t know how this will impact you and just because you’re not classed as vulnerable – doesn’t mean you’re not at risk."

 

The public are encouraged to continue to be vigilant of coronavirus symptoms which include a new continuous cough, high temperature, or a loss or change in your sense of taste or smell. If you or someone you know, displays any symptoms, no matter how mild, please get a free test by calling 119 or visiting NHS.uk

 

Background information

 

 

Additional information about the Test and Trace approach

The new NHS Test and Trace service helps identify, contain and control coronavirus, reduce the spread of the virus and save lives. We all have a vital role to play in tackling coronavirus and NHS Test and Trace will help us return life to as close to normal as possible in a way that is safe and avoids a second peak.

 

If you have coronavirus symptoms you must self-isolate immediately with other members of your household and book a test on the website: nhs.uk/coronavirus or via 119.

 

Those who have tested positive for coronavirus will be contacted by the service by text, email or phone – and asked to share information about their recent close contacts. Close contacts could include household members, people with whom they have been in direct contact, or within 2 metres for more than 15 minutes.

 

Endnotes (links within the text above)

 

Endnote 1: van Doremalen N, Bushmaker T, Morris DH, et al. Aerosol and Surface Stability of SARS-CoV2 as Compared with SARS-CoV-1. N Engl J Med 2020; 382(16): 1564-7

 

Endnote 2: Beale S, Johnson A, Zambon M, null n, Hayward A, Fragaszy E. Hand Hygiene Practices and the Risk of Human Coronavirus Infections in a UK Community Cohort [version 1; peer review: 1 approved]. Wellcome Open Research 2020; 5(98).

 

Endnote 3: A. C. Fears et al., “Persistence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 in Aerosol Suspensions,” Emerg. Infect. Dis., vol. 26, no. 9, Sep. 2020, doi: 10.3201/eid2609.201806.

 

Endnote 4: D. K. Milton, M. P. Fabian, B. J. Cowling, M. L. Grantham, and J. J. McDevitt, “Influenza Virus Aerosols in Human Exhaled Breath: Particle Size, Culturability, and Effect of Surgical Masks,” PLoS Pathog., vol. 9, no. 3, 2013, doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1003205.

 

Endnote 5: W. Chen, N. Zhang, J. Wei, H. Yen, and Y. Li, “Short-range airborne route dominates exposure of respiratory infection during close contact,” Build. Environ., pp. 1–33, 2020, doi: 10.1016/j.buildenv.2020.106859

 

Published 9 September 2020

Link to source data

__________________________________________________________

Guidance

Stay alert and safe: social distancing guidance for young people

 

The most important thing we can do is to stay alert, control the virus, and in doing so, save lives.

 

Details

This guidance applies in England – young people in ScotlandWales and Northern Ireland should follow the specific rules in those parts of the UK.

 

COVID-19 is a new type of coronavirus that causes illness in people by affecting their lungs and therefore their breathing. The virus can be spread from person to person by coughing or touching your eyes, nose or mouth with hands that have been contaminated by the virus. The name COVID-19 comes from Coronavirus Disease 2019 – it was named in December 2019. This guidance will refer to this as coronavirus (COVID-19).

 

All of us, including young people, have helped to reduce the spread of coronavirus. We have done this by making changes to our lives and following the guidance. As we move to the next stage of controlling coronavirus, it is important that we stay alert and follow the guidance in order to save lives. By “alert” we mean being aware of how to behave safely and keeping up to date with the latest government guidance.

 

The government has developed a plan to allow people to gradually go back to the way they were living before coronavirus. This will not be happening immediately, and may happen in different stages for different people. Our goal is to “stay alert, control the virus, save lives’.

 

To stop coronavirus (COVID-19) spreading, everyone should be staying at home as much as possible. Some young people, who are clinically extremely vulnerable, should stay at home all the time. This is called ‘shielding’. Guidance on ‘shielding’ for these clinically extremely vulnerable young people is available here.

 

This guidance is about social distancing and what you can do to stay alert and safe during this time, and explains the new measures that will help you to stay safe as rules on being outside, or at school or work, change.

 

Published 24 May 2020
Last updated 9 September 2020

Link to source data

__________________________________________________________

Speech

PM press conference statement: 9 September 2020

Prime Minister Boris Johnson made a statement at the coronavirus press conference.

 

Good afternoon,

 

Welcome back to Downing Street for an update on coronavirus as we enter autumn and approach winter.

I will first hand over to Chris to take us through the latest data before I set out how we are responding to it.

Thank you Chris. It is clear from that very powerful graphic that we must act.

 

The most important thing every one of us must do is remember the basics.

 

First, wash your hands, regularly and for 20 seconds. Don’t get back into old habits, it is so vital.

 

Second, wear a face covering over your mouth and nose if you are in an enclosed space and in close contact with people you don’t normally meet. I know wearing a face covering feels odd to some people and I understand that. But face coverings do make it harder for the virus to spread – so please, wear one to protect others.

 

Third, make space. Always stay 2 metres away from people you don’t live with – or 1 metre with extra precautions, like extra ventilation, screens, or face coverings.

 

Fourth, if you have COVID symptoms, get a test and self-isolate. We are now processing 1.2 million tests a week. To date we have carried out 15.4 million antigen tests – that’s more than any other country in Europe, and more per head than other European countries like Germany and Spain.

 

We are increasing our testing capacity further to meet rising demand. You can help by only booking a test if you have a fever, a new continuous cough, or you’ve lost your sense of taste or smell – if you don’t have those symptoms and haven’t been asked to book a test, please don’t.

 

So those are the basics – hands, face, space – and get a test if you have COVID symptoms.

 

Since the pandemic began, we have asked you to reduce your social contact and limit your interactions with friends and family.

 

I know that, over time, the rules have become quite complicated and confusing. We have spoken to police officers about what they need for an effective enforcement regime and of course, listened to the feedback from you, the public.

 

In response, we are simplifying and strengthening the rules – making them easier for you to understand and for the police to enforce.

 

I should stress that if we are to beat the virus then everyone, at all times, should limit social contact as much as possible and minimise interactions with other households. It is safer to meet outdoors and you should keep your distance from anyone you don’t live with, even if they are close friends or family.

 

So in England, from Monday, we are introducing the rule of 6. You must not meet socially in groups of more than 6 – and if you do, you will be breaking the law.

 

This will apply in any setting, indoors or outdoors, at home or in the pub.

 

The ban will be set out in law and it will be enforced by the police – anyone breaking the rules risks being dispersed, fined and possibly arrested.

 

Existing ban on gatherings of more than 30 and the current guidance on allowing 2 households to meet indoors. Now you only need to remember the rule of 6.

 

There will be some limited exemptions. For example, if a single household or support bubble is larger than 6, they can still gather.

 

COVID Secure venues like places of worship, gyms, restaurants and hospitality venues can still hold more than 6 people in total. Within those venues however, there must not be individual groups larger than 6, and groups must not mix socially or form larger groups.

 

Education and work settings are unaffected, COVID Secure weddings and funerals can go ahead, up to a limit of 30 people, and organised sport will still be able to proceed.

 

As we have found on previous occasions, this rule of 6 will of course throw up difficult cases. For example, two whole households will no longer be able to meet if they would together exceed the limit of 6 people.

 

I am sorry about that and I wish that we did not have to take this step. But, as your Prime Minister, I must do what is necessary to stop the spread of the virus and to save lives.

 

We will of course keep the rule of 6 under constant review and only keep it in place as long as it’s necessary.

 

I also want to see – and the public wants to see – stronger enforcement of the rules which are already in place. So I’ve have tasked the Cabinet with increasing enforcement and I would like to thank the police, as always, and other authorities for the work they are doing to keep us all safe.

 

In future:

  • Premises and venues where people meet socially will be legally required to request the contact details of a member of every party, record and retain these details for 21 days, and provide them to NHS Test & Trace without delay when required.
  • We will support local authorities to make further and faster use of their powers to close venues that are breaking the rules and pose a risk to public health.
  • Fines will be levied against hospitality venues that fail to ensure their premises remain COVID Secure.
  • We will boost the enforcement capacity of local authorities by introducing COVID Secure Marshalls to help ensure social distancing in town and city centres, and by setting up a register of Environmental Health Officers that local authorities can draw upon for support.
  • We will simplify the Passenger Locator Form needed for travelling to the UK, and take measures to ensure these are completed and checked before departure.
  • Border Force will step up enforcement efforts at the border to ensure arrivals are complying with the quarantine rules.
  • We will also restrict the opening hours of premises, initially in some local areas.

 

At the present time we must also, I’m afraid, revise plans to pilot larger audiences in venues later this month and review our intention to return audiences to stadiums and conference centres from 1 October. That doesn’t mean we’re going to scrap the programme entirely it just means we are going to review and abridge it, and the Culture Secretary will say more shortly.

 

Let me be clear – these measures are not a second national lockdown – the whole point of them is to avoid a second national lockdown.

 

By bearing down on social contact and improving enforcement, we can keep schools and businesses open, in the knowledge they are COVID Secure.

 

I have always said schools and colleges should only ever be shut again as a very, very last resort. As the Chief Medical Officer and Chief Scientific Adviser have said, the long term risks to children’s life chances of not going to school are significant and far greater than the health risks of going back to school.

 

Indeed it’s been fantastic to see so many children back in school this term and I want, once again, to thank all our teachers, and to reassure parents and pupils that schools are safe.

 

University terms will also begin soon. Opening universities is critical, again, for students’ life chances and, again, the health risks to individuals are low.

 

Of course, many university students are in the age bracket where we have seen the infection rates rise recently as Chris was just explaining. My message to students is simple. Please, for the sake of your education and your parents’ and your grandparents’ health: wash your hands, cover your face, make space, and don’t socially gather in groups of more than 6, now and when term starts.

 

Today the Department for Education is publishing updated guidance for universities on how they can operate in a COVID Secure way, including a clear request not to send students home in the event of an outbreak, so as to avoid spreading the virus across the country. I am very grateful to universities for their continued cooperation and planning for the return of students.

 

The measures I have set out today will help us control the virus but won’t, on their own, be enough to allow a more significant return to normality.

 

Patrick is going to set out in a moment where we are on vaccines and treatments in a moment, but we are not there yet and there are no guarantees.

 

So over the summer, we have therefore been working up an alternative plan which could allow life to return closer to normality. And that plan is based on mass testing.

 

Up to now, we have used testing primarily to identify people who are positive – so we can isolate them from the community and protect high risk groups. And that will continue to be our priority. We are working hard to increase our testing capacity to 500,000 tests a day by the end of October.

 

But in future, in the near future, we want to start using testing to identify people who are negative – who don’t have coronavirus and who are not infectious - so we can allow them to behave in a more normal way, in the knowledge they cannot infect anyone else with the virus.

 

And we think, we hope, we believe that new types of test which are simple, quick and scalable will become available. They use swabs or saliva and can turn round results in 90 or even 20 minutes. Crucially, it should be possible to deploy these tests on a far bigger scale than any country has yet achieved – literally millions of tests processed every single day.

 

That level of testing would allow people to lead more normal lives, without the need for social distancing:

Theatres and sports venues could test all audience members on the day and let in those with a negative result, all those who are not infectious. Workplaces could be opened up to all those who test negative that morning and allow them to behave in a way that was normal before COVID. Those isolating because they are a contact, or quarantining after travelling abroad, could after a period be tested and released. Now that is an ambitious agenda, but we are going to pilot this approach in Salford from next month, with audiences in indoor and outdoor venues. And then we hope to go nationwide.

 

There are a number of challenges. We need the technology to work. We need to source the necessary materials to manufacture so many tests. We need to put in place an efficient distribution network. And we need to work through the numerous logistical challenges.

 

And as I say, we are not there yet, and I should repeat that, as we manage this period of high demand, it is especially important that if individuals don’t have symptoms, and have not been specifically advised to take a test, they should not be coming forward for a test - because they could be taking a test away from someone who really needs it.

Our plan – this moonshot that I am describing – will require a giant, collaborative effort from government, business, public health professionals, scientists, logistics experts and many, many more.

 

Work is underway – and we will get on at pace until we get there, round the clock.

 

We are hopeful this approach will be widespread by the spring and, if everything comes together, it may be possible even for challenging sectors like theatres to have life much closer to normal before Christmas.

 

But as I have said before, all this progress is contingent on continued scientific advances and though we’re hopeful, I cannot 100% guarantee that those advances will be made.

 

That is why it is so important that we take these tough measures now.

 

I believe we will continue to drive this virus down and that we will beat this virus before too long.

 

So let’s work together and follow the rules: meet in groups of no more than six. Wash your hands, cover your face, and make space.

 

I will now hand over to Patrick to set out the latest on vaccines and treatments, and then we’ll go to questions from the public and the media.

 

Published 9 September 2020

From: Prime Minister's Office, 10 Downing Street and The Rt Hon Boris Johnson MP

Delivered on: 9 September 2020 (Transcript of the speech, exactly as it was delivered)

Link to source data

__________________________________________________________

 

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Latest R number and growth rate

Last updated on Friday 11 September 2020.
 

Latest R number range for the UK

1.0-1.2

Latest growth rate range for the UK

-1% to +3%per day

 

An R number between 1.0 and 1.2 means that on average every 10 people infected will infect between 10 and 12 other people. The UK estimates of R and growth rate are averages over very different epidemiological situations and should be regarded as a guide to the general trend rather than a description of the epidemic state.

 

image.png

When the numbers of cases or deaths fall to low levels and/or there is a high degree of variability in transmission across a region, then care should be taken when interpreting estimates of R and the growth rate. For example, a significant amount of variability across a region due to a local outbreak may mean that a single average value does not accurately reflect the way infections are changing throughout that region.

 

It is SAGE’s expert view, however, that this week’s estimates are reliable, and that the epidemic is growing.

These estimates represent the transmission of COVID-19 over the past few weeks due to the time delay between someone being infected, having symptoms and needing healthcare.

 

Estimates for R and growth rates are shown as a range, and the true values are likely to lie within this range.

 

Latest for devolved administrations:

The latest ranges for values in the devolved administrations are published on their respective websites:

Northern Ireland R number

Scotland R number

Wales R number (Cymraeg)

 

 

Published 15 May 2020
Last updated 11 September 2020

Link to source data

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have had to self isolate for 14 days and you do not have any coronavirus symptoms after 14 days, you can stop self-isolating. The rules vary in different parts of the UK so you will then need to follow the same rules for the part of the UK you’re staying in. See the links below:

England

Scotland

Wales

Northern Ireland

 

Published 3 June 2020
Last updated 15 September 2020

Link to source data

__________________________________________________________

 

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): getting tested

 

Contents:

  • Who can be tested
  • The testing process
  • Care homes

List of essential workers and those prioritised for testing (England only)

You can get a swab test to check if you currently have coronavirus. This is part of the 5-pillar strategy for coronavirus testing. Testing is most effective within 3 days of symptoms developing.

 

Who can be tested

 

Anyone with symptoms can get a coronavirus test, whatever their age.

Once you’ve received a coronavirus home test kit, you must register it so that we can send your results to you.

See the guidance below on testing for care home residents and workers.

 

Employer referral for essential workers

 

Employers can refer essential workers for testing if they are self-isolating because either they or member(s) of their household have coronavirus symptoms.

 

They can do this by uploading the names and contact details of self-isolating essential workers to the secure employer referral portal.

 

Referred essential workers will then receive a text message with a unique invitation code to book a test for themselves (if symptomatic) or their symptomatic household member(s) at a regional testing site.

 

To get a login to the employer referral portal, employers of essential workers should email portalservicedesk@dhsc.gov.uk with the following information:

  • organisation name
  • nature of the organisation’s business
  • region
  • names (where possible) and email addresses of the 2 users who will load essential worker contact details

Once employer details have been verified, 2 login credentials will be provided for the employer referral portal.

See the list of essential workers below.

 

The testing process

 

The test involves taking a swab of the nose and the back of the throat, which can be done by the person themselves (self-administered) or by someone else (assisted).

 

The different ways you can get tested are covered below.

 

Test sites

 

We’re establishing a network of drive-through and walk-through test sites.

 

Watch a video explaining the process for drive-through testing:

 

Coronavirus tests for essential workers

 

Home testing

 

Home test kits can be delivered to someone’s door so they can test themselves and their family without leaving the house. Home test kit availability will be initially limited, but more will become available.

 

If you have been delivered a home testing kit or have been given a self-test kit at a regional test site, here is a tutorial video that supports the written instructions in your pack, from Dr Amir Khan:

 

How to take a coronavirus self-test swab

 

You can also read:

Mobile testing units

 

Mobile testing units travel around the UK to increase access to coronavirus testing. They respond to need, travelling to test essential workers at sites including care homes, police stations and prisons.

 

New units are being brought into operation each day.

 

Satellite centres

 

NHS capability is being increased by providing test kits directly to ‘satellite’ centres at places like hospitals that have a particularly urgent or significant need.

 

NHS facilities

 

Testing within an NHS facility such as a hospital is available for patients and some NHS workers.

 

Across all these testing methods, there is a network of couriers who collect the completed samples and deliver them safely to one of our laboratories. The swab samples are analysed at our labs and the result is communicated back to the individual.

 

We aim to return test results within 48 hours of a swab being taken, or within 72 hours for a home test.

 

Care homes

 

England

In England, all registered adult care homes can apply for coronavirus tests.

 

You should contact your local Health Protection Team (HPT) if:

  • you suspect your care home has a new coronavirus outbreak (one or more suspected or confirmed cases of COVID-19)
  • it has been 28 days or longer since your last case and you have new cases

Your HPT will provide advice and arrange the first tests. See a graphic summarising testing for care homes (PDF, 60.2KB, 2 pages).

 

For testing in other situations, you should apply for testing kits following the instructions below.

 

Scotland

 

In a care home where there is one or more confirmed case of coronavirus, the local health board must offer testing to all staff and residents regardless of symptoms as part of enhanced outbreak investigations. Testing will be organised by local health board testing teams, using local and NHS Scotland laboratory capacity.

 

In a care home with no positive cases for 2 weeks or more, the local health board must offer testing to all staff on a weekly basis. Please follow the instructions below to access this routine testing of staff in your care home.

 

Wales

Existing arrangements include testing:

 

  • all residents and staff of care homes with ongoing cases of COVID-19 and any home reporting a new outbreak
  • larger care homes registered for 50 or more beds
  • all people being discharged from hospital to live in care homes regardless of whether or not they were admitted to hospital with COVID-19
  • all people who are being transferred between care homes and for new admissions from the community

This policy has been supplemented by a large-scale testing programme covering all residents and staff across care homes in Wales that have not reported an outbreak or any cases of coronavirus in the last 28 days. It’s being followed up through a weekly rolling programme to test care home staff.

 

Wales’ policy for testing in care homes will continue to be reviewed and adapted as the scientific evidence changes

 

How to test care home residents and workers

 

You can apply for coronavirus testing kits to test the residents and/or staff of your care home. You can apply whether or not any of your residents or staff have coronavirus symptoms.

Regular testing in care homes (England)

 

On 6 July, we started rolling out regular testing (retesting) for care homes in England. Retesting involves care homes testing staff weekly and residents every 28 days.

 

Applications for retesting are now open for care homes caring for the over-65s and those with dementia. The remaining adult care homes will be able to register for retesting from 31 August.

 

Any specialist care homes that have not yet registered for their initial whole care home tests should still apply on the care home portal to receive their initial whole care home tests.

 

Care homes will need to re-register on the care home portal to apply for retesting. Applications for retesting are now open for care homes caring for the over-65s and those with dementia.

 

See a graphic summarising testing for care homes (PDF, 60.2KB, 2 pages).

 

Workers with symptoms

 

Care home workers with symptoms should be self-isolating and can access testing through the self-referral or employer referral portals, above.

 

Information about testing kits

 

There are 2 types of test kits delivered to care homes:

  • Randox test kits
  • all other types, known as Kingfisher test kits

The test kits look similar and test for whether someone currently has coronavirus in the same way. You will be told which test kits you will be using when you receive confirmation of your delivery. All of these kits are throat and nose swab tests and will tell a person whether they had coronavirus at the time the test took place. They cannot tell a person if they have had coronavirus in the past.

 

Watch a video on how to administer nasal and throat swabs for residents:

 

Coronavirus test tutorial for care homes with Dr Sarah Jarvis

 

Carers and nurses who will be swabbing residents in care homes should complete the online care home swabbing competency assessment before carrying out swabbing.

 

Individuals can register at www.genqa.org/carehomes or care home managers can create an organisational account by contacting info@genqa.org.

 

Book your courier collection

 

A courier will collect your used testing kits. These will be taken to a lab for processing.

 

Book your courier collection by 7pm at least a day before carrying out testing.

 

Carry out testing on the day of collection.

 

Documents for care homes using the online application portal

List of essential workers and those prioritised for testing (England only)

  • all NHS and social care staff, including:
  • doctors, nurses, midwives, paramedics, social workers, care workers, and other frontline health and social care staff, including community pharmacists and their staff, volunteers and unpaid carers
  • the support and specialist staff required to maintain the UK’s health and social care sector
  • those working as part of the health and social care supply chain, including producers and distributors of medicines, and medical and personal protective equipment
  • NHS Blood and Transplant frontline staff (blood donation staff, specialist nurses for organ donation, staff running therapeutic apheresis services in NHS hospitals)
  • those providing ancillary support to NHS workers (such as hotel accommodation for NHS staff)
  • personal care assistants
  • essential public services staff, including:
  • prisons, probation, courts and tribunals staff, judiciary
  • religious staff
  • charities and workers delivering critical frontline services
  • those responsible for the management of the deceased
  • journalists and broadcasters covering coronavirus or providing public service broadcasting
  • public health and environmental staff, such as specialist community public health nursing
  • public safety and national security staff, including:
  • police and support staff
  • Ministry of Defence civilians, contractors and armed forces personnel (those critical to the delivery of critical defence and national security outputs and critical to the response to the coronavirus pandemic), including defence medical staff
  • fire and rescue service employees (including support staff),
  • National Crime Agency staff, those maintaining border security, prison and probation staff and other national security roles, including those overseas
  • British Transport Police and the Maritime and Coastguard Agency
  • transport workers, including:
  • those who keep the air, water, road and rail passenger and freight transport modes operating during the coronavirus response
  • those working on transport systems through which supply chains pass
  • education and childcare workers, including:
  • support and teaching staff
  • social workers
  • specialist education professionals
  • critical personnel in the production and distribution of food, drink and essential goods, including:
  • those involved in food production, processing, distribution, sale and delivery
  • those critical to the provision of other essential goods, such as medical supply chain and distribution workers, and testing (such as PHE labs), and veterinary medicine
  • workers critical to the continuity of essential movement of goods
  • local and national government staff critical to the effective delivery of the coronavirus response, or delivering essential public services, such as the payment of benefits
  • public and environmental health staff, including in government agencies and arm’s length bodies
  • funeral industry workers
  • frontline local authority staff and volunteers, including
  • those working with vulnerable children and adults, victims of domestic abuse, and the homeless and rough sleepers (and hotel staff supporting these groups)
  • voluntary sector organisations providing substance misuse treatment
  • utilities, communication and financial services staff, including:
  • staff needed for essential financial services provision (including but not limited to workers in banks, building societies and financial market infrastructure)
  • the oil, gas, electricity and water sectors (including sewerage)
  • information technology and data infrastructure sector and primary industry supplies to continue during the coronavirus response
  • essential staff working in the civil nuclear, chemicals, telecommunications (including but not limited to network operations, field engineering, call centre staff, IT and data infrastructure, 999 and 111 essential services), postal services and delivery, payments providers and waste disposal sectors

Read the privacy notice on coronavirus testing for essential workers.

 

Published 15 April 2020
Last updated 17 September 2020 

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

 

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Press release

New package to support and enforce self-isolation

 

People will be required by law to self-isolate from 28 September, supported by payment of £500 for those on lower incomes who cannot work from home and have lost income as a result. New fines for those breaching self-isolation rules will start at £1,000 – bringing this in line with the penalty for breaking quarantine after international travel - but could increase to up to £10,000 for repeat offences and for the most egregious breaches, including for those preventing others from self-isolating.

 

For example, this could include business owners who threaten self-isolating staff with redundancy if they do not come to work, sending a clear message that this will not be tolerated.

 

A number of steps will be taken to make sure that people are complying with the rules, these include:

  • NHS Test and Trace call handlers making regular contact with those self-isolating, with the ability to escalate any suspicion of non-compliance to Local Authorities and local police;
  • Using police resources to check compliance in highest incidence areas and in high-risk groups, based on local intelligence;
  • Investigating and prosecuting high-profile and egregious cases of non-compliance; and
  • Acting on instances where third parties have identified others who have tested positive, but are not self-isolating.

Recognising that self-isolation is one of the most powerful tools for controlling the transmission of Covid-19, this new Test and Trace Support payment of £500 will ensure that those on low incomes are able to self-isolate without worry about their finances.

 

Just under 4 million people who are in receipt of benefits in England will be eligible for this payment, which will be available to those who are required to self-isolate from 28 September.

 

Local Authorities will be working quickly to set up these self-isolation support schemes and we expect them to be in place by 12 October. Those who start to self-isolate from 28 September will receive backdated payments once the scheme is set up in their Local Authority.

 

This financial support comes as the government places a legal requirement on people to self-isolate when instructed to by NHS Test and Trace and introduces tougher fines for breaking the rules.

Many people are following the rules around self-isolation, but these steps will make sure more do and help ensure the public do not unknowingly spread the virus.

 

The Prime Minister said:

"The best way we can fight this virus is by everyone following the rules and self-isolating if they’re at risk of passing on coronavirus. And so nobody underestimates just how important this is, new regulations will mean you are legally obliged to do so if you have the virus or have been asked to do so by NHS Test and Trace."

"People who choose to ignore the rules will face significant fines. We need to do all we can to control the spread of this virus, to prevent the most vulnerable people from becoming infected, and to protect the NHS and save lives."

"And while most people are doing their absolute level best to comply with the rules, I don’t want to see a situation where people don’t feel they are financially able to self-isolate."

"That’s why we’re also introducing a new £500 Test and Trace Support payment for those on low incomes who are required by NHS Test and Trace to remain at home to help stop the spread of the virus."

 

Published 20 September 2020

Link to source

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

News story

 

PM Boris Johnson had calls with the First Ministers of

Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and the deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland.

 

Earlier today, the Prime Minister had calls with the First Ministers of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland and the deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland about how coronavirus is spreading across the country.

 

During these calls, the Prime Minister made clear that the rising infection rates are a cause for great concern, which he is taking very seriously.

 

He reiterated his unwavering commitment to working with the devolved administrations as we continue to tackle the virus. They all agreed to act with a united approach, as much as possible, in the days and weeks ahead.

 

The Prime Minister invited the First Ministers and the deputy First Minister to attend a COBR tomorrow to discuss next steps for the country.

 

Published 21 September 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

 

Slides to accompany coronavirus data briefing: 21 September 2020

image.png

 

image.png

 

image.png

Published 21 September 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

 

News story

Update from the UK Chief Medical Officers on the COVID-19 alert level

A joint statement from the UK CMOs recommending that the

UK COVID-19 alert level move from level 3 to level 4

  • "The Joint Biosecurity Centre has recommended that the COVID-19 alert level should move from level 3 (COVID-19 epidemic is in general circulation) to level 4 (COVID-19 epidemic is in general circulation, transmission is high or rising exponentially)."
  • "The CMOs for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have reviewed the evidence and recommend all 4 nations of the UK should move to level 4."
  • "After a period of lower COVID cases and deaths, the number of cases are now rising rapidly and probably exponentially in significant parts of all 4 nations. If we are to avoid significant excess deaths and exceptional pressure in the NHS and other health services over the autumn and winter, everyone has to follow the social distancing guidance, wear face coverings correctly and wash their hands regularly."
  • "We know this will be a concerning news for many people. Please follow the rules, look after each other and together we will get through this."

 

Chief Medical Officer for England, Professor Chris Whitty

Chief Medical Officer for Northern Ireland, Dr Michael McBride

Chief Medical Officer for Scotland, Dr Gregor Smith

Deputy Chief Medical Officer for Wales, Dr Chris Jones

 

Published 21 September 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

Currently we are at alert level 3 but while not implemented at this stage a return to level 4 is what is being recommended by the CMOs.

According to the BBC the PM will speak in parliament this afternoon and make an announcement to the country this evening  22nd September 2020.

image.png

__________________________________________________________

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Speech

 

Prime Minister's statement on coronavirus (COVID-19): 22 September 2020

Prime Minister Boris Johnson addressed the nation on coronavirus.

Video link to PM's address to the nation

 

Good evening, the struggle against covid is the single biggest crisis the world has faced in my lifetime.

 

In less than a year this disease has killed almost a million people, and caused havoc to economies everywhere.

 

Here in the UK we mourn every person we have lost, and we grieve with their families.

 

And yet I am more certain than ever that this is a struggle that humanity will win, and we in this country will win – and to achieve what we must I want to talk to you directly tonight about the choices that we face – none of them easy – and why we must take action now.

 

I know that we can succeed because we have succeeded before.

 

When the sickness took hold in this country in March, we pulled together in a spirit of national sacrifice and community. We followed the guidance to the letter. We stayed at home, protected the NHS, and saved thousands of lives.

 

And for months with those disciplines of social distancing we have kept that virus at bay.

 

But we have to acknowledge this this is a great and freedom-loving country; and while the vast majority have complied with the rules there have been too many breaches – too many opportunities for our invisible enemy to slip through undetected.

 

The virus has started to spread again in an exponential way. Infections are up, hospital admissions are climbing.

 

We can see what is happening in France and Spain, and we know, alas, that this virus is no less fatal than it was in the spring, and that the vast majority of our people are no less susceptible, and the iron laws of geometrical progression are shouting at us from the graphs that we risk many more deaths, many more families losing loved ones before their time;

 

and I know that faced with that risk the British people will want their government to continue to fight to protect them, you, and that is what we are doing, night and day. And yet the single greatest weapon we bring to this fight is the common sense of the people themselves – the joint resolve of this country to work together to suppress covid now.

 

So today I set out a package of tougher measures in England – early closing for pubs, bars; table service only; closing businesses that are not covid secure; expanding the use of face coverings, and new fines for those that fail to comply;

 

and once again asking office workers to work from home if they can while enforcing the rule of six indoors and outdoors – a tougher package of national measures combined with the potential for tougher local restrictions for areas already in lockdown. I know that this approach – robust but proportionate – already carries the support of all the main parties in parliament.

 

After discussion with colleagues in the Devolved Administrations, I believe this broad approach is shared across the whole UK. And to those who say we don’t need this stuff, and we should leave people to take their own risks, I say these risks are not our own.

 

The tragic reality of having covid is that your mild cough can be someone else’s death knell.

 

And as for the suggestion that we should simply lock up the elderly and the vulnerable – with all the suffering that would entail – I must tell you that this is just not realistic, because if you let the virus rip through the rest of the population it would inevitably find its way through to the elderly as well, and in much greater numbers.

That’s why we need to suppress the virus now, and as for that minority who may continue to flout the rules, we will enforce those rules with tougher penalties and fines of up to £10,000. We will put more police out on the streets and use the army to backfill if necessary.

 

And of course I am deeply, spiritually reluctant to make any of these impositions, or infringe anyone’s freedom, but unless we take action the risk is that we will have to go for tougher measures later, when the deaths have already mounted and we have a huge caseload of infection such as we had in the spring.

 

If we let this virus get out of control now, it would mean that our NHS had no space – once again – to deal with cancer patients and millions of other non-covid medical needs.

 

And if we were forced into a new national lockdown, that would threaten not just jobs and livelihoods but the loving human contact on which we all depend.

 

It would mean renewed loneliness and confinement for the elderly and vulnerable, and ultimately it would threaten once again the education of our children. We must do all we can to avoid going down that road again.

 

But if people don’t follow the rules we have set out, then we must reserve the right to go further. We must take action now because a stitch in time saves nine; and this way we can keep people in work, we can keep our shops and our schools open, and we can keep our country moving forward while we work together to suppress the virus.

 

That is our strategy, and if we can follow this package together, then I know we can succeed because in so many ways we are better prepared than before.

 

We have the PPE, we have the beds, we have the Nightingales, we have new medicines – pioneered in this country – that can help save lives.

 

And though our doctors and our medical advisers are rightly worried about the data now, and the risks over winter, they are unanimous that things will be far better by the spring, when we have not only the hope of a vaccine, but one day soon – and I must stress that we are not there yet - of mass testing so efficient that people will be able to be tested in minutes so they can do more of the things they love. That’s the hope; that’s the dream. It’s hard, but it’s attainable, and we are working as hard as we can to get there.

 

But until we do, we must rely on our willingness to look out for each other, to protect each other. Never in our history has our collective destiny and our collective health depended so completely on our individual behaviour.

If we follow these simple rules together, we will get through this winter together. There are unquestionably difficult months to come.

 

And the fight against covid is by no means over. I have no doubt, however, that there are great days ahead.

 

But now is the time for us all to summon the discipline, and the resolve, and the spirit of togetherness that will carry us through.

 

Published 22 September 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

Information

Link to the commons statement that preceded the PM's address to the nation

Prime Minister Boris Johnson made a statement on coronavirus to the House of Commons.

Published 22 September 2020

__________________________________________________________

Guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): Meeting with others safely (social distancing)

Information on meeting with others safely.

Published 22 September 2020

__________________________________________________________

Guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): safer travel guidance for passengers

Walking, cycling, and travelling in vehicles or on public transport during the coronavirus outbreak.

Published 22 September 2020

 

 

__________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Press release

NHS COVID-19 app launches across England and Wales

NHS COVID-19 app launches to help control coronavirus (COVID-19) transmission.

 

  • NHS COVID-19 app launches nationwide to help control COVID-19 transmission alongside national and local contact tracing
  • Features of the app include contact tracing using Bluetooth, risk alerts based on postcode district, QR check-in at venues, symptom checker and test booking – with user privacy and data security at its heart
  • Businesses are now required by law to display the official NHS QR code posters from today so people can check-in at different premises with the app

People across England and Wales are being urged to download the NHS COVID-19 app to help control the spread of coronavirus and protect themselves and their loved ones as case numbers rise.

 

The app launches today, and after positive trials and rigorous testing is an important new tool to work alongside traditional contact tracing to help reduce the spread of the virus.

 

It will be available to those aged 16 and over in multiple languages. It forms a central part of the NHS Test and Trace service in England and the NHS Wales Test, Trace, Protect programme - identifying contacts of those who have tested positive for coronavirus.

 

As part of a major campaign to encourage downloads of the app a new advertisement will launch on primetime TV tonight with the strapline ‘Protect your loved ones. Get the app.’

 

Today the UK’s major mobile network operators, including Vodafone, Three, EE and O2, Sky and Virgin, have confirmed that all in-app activity will not come out of customers’ data allowance.

 

The contact tracing element of the app works by using low-energy Bluetooth to log the amount of time you spend near other app users, and the distance between you, so it can alert you if someone you have been close to later tests positive for COVID-19 – even if you don’t know each other.

 

The app will advise you to self-isolate if you have been in close contact with a confirmed case. It will also enable you to check symptoms, book a free test if needed and get your test results.

 

The app has been designed with user privacy in mind, so it tracks the virus, not people and uses the latest in data security technology to protect privacy. The system generates a random ID for an individual’s device, which can be exchanged between devices via Bluetooth (not GPS). These unique random IDs regenerate frequently to add an extra layer of security and preserve anonymity.

 

The app does not hold personal information such as your name, address or date of birth, and only requires the first half of your postcode to ensure local outbreaks can be managed. No personal data is shared with the government or the NHS.

 

UK government Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said:

"We are at a tipping point in our efforts to control the spread of this virus. With infection rates rising we must use every tool at our disposal to prevent transmission, including the latest technology."

"We have worked extensively with tech companies, international partners, and privacy and medical experts – and learned from the trials – to develop an app that is secure, simple to use and will help keep our country safe.

"Today’s launch marks an important step forward in our fight against this invisible killer and I urge everyone who can to download and use the app to protect themselves and their loved ones."

 

From today certain businesses in England are required by law to display NHS Test and Trace QR codes so customers with the NHS COVID-19 app can use them to check-in. QR codes will help businesses meet their legal requirement to log contact details and allow public health leads to send alerts based on whether people have checked in at venues. So far, more than 160,000 businesses have already downloaded QR codes. Venues in Wales that are legally required to collect and keep a record of visitors will still need to do so.

 

The NHS Test and Trace team behind the app has worked closely with major tech companies, including Google and Apple, scientists within the Alan Turing Institute and Oxford University, Zuhlke Engineering, medical experts, privacy groups, at-risk communities and teams in countries across the world using similar apps – such as Germany, to develop an app that is safe, simple and secure.

 

The app has been through successful trials in the Isle of Wight, Newham and among NHS Volunteer Responders. Lessons learned have informed the final version that is launching today.

 

Dido Harding, Executive Chair of England’s NHS Test and Trace Programme, said:

"We want to make it as easy as possible for everyone to engage with England’s NHS Test and Trace service. The NHS COVID-19 app enables the majority of people with a smartphone to find out if they are at risk of having caught the virus and need to self isolate, order a test if they have symptoms, and access the right guidance and advice."

"The features of this app, including QR code check-in at venues, work alongside our traditional contact tracing service and will help us to reach more people quickly in their communities to prevent further spread of the virus."

"This is a welcome step in protecting those around us."

 

Simon Thompson, Managing Director of the NHS COVID-19 App, said:

"We have worked tirelessly to develop the new NHS COVID-19 app and we are incredibly grateful to all residents of the Isle of Wight, London Borough of Newham, and NHS Volunteer Responders, the learnings and insight have made the app what it is today. We are now ready to roll-out the app across England and Wales."

"This new version is so much more than just a contact tracing app – it has a range of features which will quickly alert you if you’re at risk of coronavirus. The more people who use it, the better it works."

"We are confident that every person who downloads the app will be helping to protect themselves and their loved ones."

 

Wales’ Health and Social Services Minister, Vaughan Gething, said:

"The launch of the NHS COVID-19 app is an important part of Wales’ coronavirus response, bolstering our Test, Trace, Protect programme. The more people who download and use this app, the more it will help us to prevent the spread of COVID-19."

"We have worked closely with the app development team to ensure it works seamlessly across England and Wales, providing people with the right advice based on where they live. In Wales, the app will complement our existing contact tracing and testing services and will further support our co-ordinated response to COVID-19 at both a local and national level."

"I strongly encourage everyone in Wales to download and use the app to keep Wales safe."

 

In a joint statement Apple and Google said:

"We built the exposure notifications system to enable public health authorities in their efforts to develop apps to help reduce the spread of the virus while ensuring people can trust in the privacy-preserving design. We are committed to supporting the government’s effort to launch an app based on this technology."

 

Hamish MacLeod, Director at Mobile UK, said:

"The mobile industry welcomes the opportunity to support the government’s efforts to combat the global COVID-19 pandemic by zero-rating access to the new NHS COVID-19 app. Customers can be reassured that all in-app activity will not come out of their data allowance."

 

Helen Dickinson, Chief Executive of the British Retail Consortium, said:

"The NHS COVID-19 app is a great addition to the safety measures already being put in by retailers. We hope it provides extra reassurance for customers and their families all across the country."

 

As well as contact tracing, the app has a range of additional, enhanced features that will help to reduce personal and public risk from COVID-19 as part of the wider testing and contact tracing service:

  • alert: letting users know the level of coronavirus risk in their postcode district
  • QR check-in: enabling users to check-in at a venue and alerting them if they have recently visited somewhere they may have come into contact with someone who later tests positive for COVID-19
  • symptoms: allowing users to check if they have coronavirus symptoms and see if they need to order a free test
  • test: helping users book a free test through the app and get results to know whether they have COVID-19
  • isolate: if a user is told to self-isolate, a timer feature will help count down that period and access will be provided to relevant advice

More information on the NHS COVID-19 app App explainer video [App privacy video}(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCH__yEHa4s&)

 

Published 24 September 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

Guidance

NHS COVID-19 app: privacy information

Privacy notice and data protection impact assessment for the NHS COVID-19 mobile app.

 

Published 24 September 2020 

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

Guidance

NHS Test and Trace: how it works (applies to England and wales)

An overview of the NHS Test and Trace service, including what happens if you test positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) or have had close contact with someone who has tested positive.

 

Published 23 September 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

 

Which phones have been successfully tested

with the NHS COVID-19 app?

 

To install and use the NHS COVID-19 app, your phone will need Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) 4 or above and Operating System software Android Marshmallow, or iOS 13.5 or above. This is because the app needs the Exposure Notification framework developed by Apple and Google, which is only available in these versions.

 

Unfortunately, if your phone does not have these requirements you may not be able to find the app called 'NHS COVID-19' in the Google Play Store or Apple App Store, or it will be listed as unsupported.

 

New models of Huawei smartphones launched from May 2019 will not be able to use the app, as the app uses Exposure Notifications, which is a technology that is created by Google and Apple.

 

The following is a list of Android and Apple smartphones that have been successfully tested with the app. If your phone is listed, and you're having difficulty installing the app, please make sure you're on Android Marshmallow or iOS 13.5 or above.

 

If your phone is not listed, it may not have been tested yet. It may still work as long as it satisfies the Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) 4 or above and Android Marshmallow (v6.0) or iOS 13.5 or above.

iPhone 6S

iPhone 7

iPhone XS

iPhone 11Pro

Xioami MI A2

Nexus 5X

Nokia 7+

Xiaomi Redmi note 8

Samsung A6

Samsung S20

Google Pixel 3

Google Pixel 3 XL

Google Pixel 3a

Google Pixel 4 (Unlocked)

Google Pixel 4 XL (Unlocked)

Google Pixel 2

Google Pixel 2 XL

Samsung Galaxy A40

Samsung Galaxy A50

Samsung Galaxy A70

Samsung Galaxy S10

Samsung Galaxy S10+

Samsung Galaxy S10e

Samsung Galaxy A5

Samsung Galaxy S9 (Unlocked)

Samsung Galaxy S9+ (Unlocked)

Samsung Galaxy Note8 (Unlocked)

 

Published 24 September 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

 

Edited by Gordon
List of compatible phones added

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Press release

More than 1 in 10 people in England have now been tested for coronavirus

NHS Test and Trace has now reached almost half a million people, including those testing positive and their contacts, to slow the transmission of coronavirus in England.

  • More than 1 in 10 people in England have been tested at least once since the service launched
  • Weekly statistics show NHS Test and Trace has now successfully reached almost 500,000 people testing positive and their contacts
  • The median distance travelled for in-person tests is 5.2 miles ‘as the crow flies’, with 28 new local test sites opening this week to help reduce distances even further

This comes after it was announced that those people asked to self-isolate who are on low incomes and are unable to work from home will be eligible for financial support of £500 to stay at home, while those breaking the rules risk fines of at least £1,000.

 

Since the launch of NHS Test and Trace on 28 May, more than 11% of people living in England have been tested at least once. This includes regular retesting of care home staff and residents, as the service sends out over 100,000 tests a day to care homes.

 

The number of people testing positive this week has increased, with NHS Test and Trace continuing to reach the vast majority of positive cases and their contacts. This week the service successfully reached 77.7% of people who tested positive and 84.7% of the contacts where communication details were provided.

 

Work continues to expand testing capacity across the UK, to reach a target of 500,000 tests a day by the end of October. More labs across the country are joining the network, with automation driving increases in tests processed each day at the country’s Lighthouse Labs. In a drive to reach 500, 28 new test sites will be opening this week, reducing the distance people need to travel to get a test.

 

The statistics show that the median distance travelled currently stands at 5.2 miles. Since 16 September, daily testing capacity has already increased by nearly 16,000 tests a day, from 242,911 to 258,877 on 23 September. The median time taken to receive a result from a test taken in person was 30 to 34 hours, with 52.9% of results received the day after they were taken.

 

Interim Executive Chair of the National Institute for Health Protection Baroness Dido Harding said:

"NHS Test and Trace has reached a milestone moment this week, successfully reaching almost half a million people and advising them to self-isolate. We are supporting those testing positive and their contacts to stay at home to stop transmission."

"The new COVID-19 app launched today will help us go even further, alerting users if they have been in close contact with someone with the virus, even if they do not know each other. I hope everyone across England and Wales downloads it today to help protect those around them from the spread of the virus."

"While millions of people in England have now successfully been tested, we continue to see unprecedented demand. We continue to work tirelessly to build our testing capacity to meet this and our target of 500,000 tests a day, building our lab network and testing sites across the country."

 

The guidance for testing remains in place, with only those experiencing symptoms eligible for tests. Symptoms of coronavirus are a new continuous cough, high temperature and/or a loss or change in taste or smell. People requiring tests are advised to make appointments at test sites, with new slots available throughout the day.

 

In response to unprecedented demand, a list of priority groups has been published outlining how the government is managing capacity to protect the most vulnerable, protect the economy and manage outbreaks. Priorities include NHS patients and workers, care home residents and staff, teachers and areas of high prevalence. Essential workers can book a test across the country by declaring their occupations.

 

The new NHS COVID-19 app has also launched today, with people across England and Wales encouraged to download it to help control transmission alongside national and local contact tracing. The app uses low-energy Bluetooth to log the amount of time you spend near other app users, and the distance between you, so it can alert you if someone you have been close to later tests positive for COVID-19 – even if you do not know each other. The app has been designed with user privacy in mind, so it tracks the virus, not people, and uses the latest in data security technology to protect privacy.

 

The weekly statistics from the 16th week of NHS Test and Trace show in the most recent week of operations (10 to 16 September):

  • testing capacity increased by 3% from the previous week to 1,663,155 (pillars 1 and 2) across the UK
  • 77.7% of people who tested positive and were transferred to the contact-tracing system were reached and asked to provide information about their contacts
  • 84.7% of contacts where communication details were given have been reached and told to self-isolate
  • pillar 1 testing capacity was at 575,155, similar to the previous week (swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, for health and care workers, and to help manage outbreaks – including in care homes)
  • pillar 2 testing capacity was at 1,089,000, an increase of 5% since the previous week (swab testing for the wider population administered by commercial partners across the UK)
  • pillar 3 testing capacity was at 840,000, the same as the previous week (antibody testing administered by PHE – these are serology tests to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19)
  • pillar 4 testing capacity was at 28,800 a decrease of 60% since the previous week (swab testing for large-scale surveillance studies on the spread of COVID-19)

Statistics from the 16th week of operation of NHS Test and Trace show that since the service launched:

  • 497,367 people have been reached by the service. This includes both those testing positive and their contacts
  • 86.4% of all contacts where communication details were given have been reached and told to self-isolate

Published 24 September 2020

Link to source

_________________________________________________________

 

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the reason for recent additional restrictions imposed within the UK 

 

Guidance

The R number and growth rate in the UK

 

Latest R number range for the UK     1.2    to    1.5

Latest growth rate range for the UK     +4%   to   +8% per day

 

The UK estimates of R and growth rate are averages over very different epidemiological situations and should be regarded as a guide to the general trend rather than a description of the epidemic state.

 

These are the latest R and growth rate estimates by NHS England regions.

image.png

When the numbers of cases or deaths fall to low levels and/or there is a high degree of variability in transmission across a region, then care should be taken when interpreting estimates of R and the growth rate. For example, a significant amount of variability across a region due to a local outbreak may mean that a single average value does not accurately reflect the way infections are changing throughout that region.

 

It is SAGE’s expert view, however, that this week’s estimates are reliable, and that there is widespread growth of the epidemic across the country.

 

These estimates represent the transmission of COVID-19 over the past few weeks due to the time delay between someone being infected, having symptoms and needing healthcare.

 

Estimates for R and growth rates are shown as a range, and the true values are likely to lie within this range.

Latest for devolved administrations

 

The latest ranges for values in the devolved administrations are published on their respective websites:

R number Northern Ireland

R number Scotland 

R number Wales  (Cymraeg)

 

What is R?

The reproduction number (R) is the average number of secondary infections produced by a single infected person.

 

An R number of 1 means that on average every person who is infected will infect 1 other person, meaning the total number of infections is stable. If R is 2, on average, each infected person infects 2 more people. If R is 0.5 then on average for each 2 infected people, there will be only 1 new infection. If R is greater than 1 the epidemic is growing, if R is less than 1 the epidemic is shrinking. The higher R is above 1, the more people 1 infected person infects and so the faster the epidemic grows.

 

R can change over time. For example, it falls when there is a reduction in the number of contacts between people, which reduces transmission. R increases when the numbers of contacts between people rise, leading to a rise in viral transmission.

 

What is a growth rate?

The growth rate reflects how quickly the number of infections are changing day by day. It is an approximation of the percentage change in the number infections each day. If the growth rate is greater than 0 (+ positive), then the epidemic is growing. If the growth rate is less than 0 (- negative) then the epidemic is shrinking.

 

The size of the growth rate indicates the speed of change. A growth rate of +5% indicates the epidemic is growing faster than a growth rate of +1%. Likewise, a growth rate of -4% indicates the epidemic is shrinking faster than a growth rate of -1%. Further technical information on growth rate can be found on Plus magazine.

 

How are growth rates different to R estimates?

R alone does not tell us how quickly an epidemic is changing. Different diseases with the same R can generate epidemics that grow at very different speeds. For instance, 2 diseases, both with R=2, could have very different lengths of time for 1 infected individual to infect 2 other people; one disease might take years, while the other might take days.

 

The growth rate provides us with information on the size and speed of change, whereas the R value only gives us information on the direction of change.

 

To calculate R, information on the time taken between each generation of infections is needed. That is how long it takes for one set of people in an infected group to infect a new set of people in the next group. This can depend on several different biological, social, and behavioural factors. The growth rate does not depend on the ‘generation time’ and so requires fewer assumptions to estimate.

 

Neither one measure, R nor growth rate, is better than the other but each provide information that is useful in monitoring the spread of a disease.

 

Estimates of the growth rates and R are currently updated on a weekly basis. However, they are not the only important measures of the epidemic. Both should be considered alongside other measures of the spread of disease, such as the number of new cases of the disease identified during a specified time period (incidence), and the proportion of the population with the disease at a given point in time (prevalence). If R equals 1 with 100,000 people currently infected, it is a very different situation to R equals 1 with 1,000 people currently infected.

 

The number of people currently infected with coronavirus (COVID-19) – and so able to pass the virus on – is therefore very important.

 

How are R and growth rates estimated?

Individual modelling groups use a range of data to estimate growth rates and R values, including:

  • epidemiological data as testing data, hospital admissions, ICU admissions and deaths – it generally takes up to 3 weeks for changes in the spread of disease to be reflected in the estimates due to the time delay between initial infection and the need for hospital care
  • contact pattern surveys that gather information on behaviour – these can be quicker (with a lag of around a week) but can be open to bias as they often rely on self-reported behaviour and make assumptions about how the information collected relates to the spread of disease
  • household infection surveys where swabs are performed on individuals – these can provide estimates of how many people are infected. Longitudinal surveys (where samples are repeatedly taken from the same people) allow a more direct estimate of the growth in infection rates

Different modelling groups use different data sources to estimate these values using mathematical models that simulate the spread of infections. Some may even use all these sources of information to adjust their models to better reflect the real-world situation. There is uncertainty in all these data sources so estimates can vary between different models, so we do not rely on just one model; evidence from several models is considered, discussed, combined, and the growth rate and R are then presented as ranges. The most likely true values are somewhere within the ranges.

 

Rounding and differences between the data streams used in these individual model outputs that are combined account for differences between estimates of R and estimated growth rates.

 

Who estimates the R and growth rates?

The growth rate and R are estimated by several independent modelling groups based in universities and Public Health England (PHE). The modelling groups discuss their individual R estimates at the Science Pandemic Influenza Modelling group (SPI-M) - a subgroup of SAGE.

 

Time delay of the estimates

SPI-M use several models, each using data from a variety of sources in their estimates of R and growth rate. Epidemiological data, such as hospital admissions, ICU admissions and deaths, usually takes up to 3 weeks to reflect changes in the spread of disease.

 

This is due to the time delay between initial infection, having symptoms and the need for hospital care. As a result, the latest published figures represent the situation over the past few weeks rather than today. These estimates do not yet fully reflect any very recent changes in transmission due to, for example, recent policy changes in the UK.

 

Limitations of R

R is an average value that can vary in different parts of the country, communities, and subsections of the population. It cannot be measured directly so there is always uncertainty around its exact value. This becomes even more of a problem when calculating R using small numbers of cases, either due to lower infection rates or smaller geographical areas. This uncertainty may be due to variability in the underlying data, leading to a wider range for R and more frequent changes in the estimates.

 

Even when the overall UK R estimate is below 1, some regions may have R estimates that include ranges that exceed 1, for example from 0.7 to 1.1; this does not necessarily mean the epidemic is increasing in that region, just that the uncertainty means it cannot be ruled out. It is also possible that an outbreak in one specific place could result in an R above 1 for the whole region.

 

Limitations of growth rates

The growth rate is an average value that can vary. When case numbers are low, uncertainty increases. This could happen when only a very small proportion of people are infected, or the geographical area considered has a very small population. A smaller number of cases means that variability in the underlying data makes it difficult to estimate the growth rate; there will be a wider range given for growth rate and frequent changes in the estimates. This will happen for both R and the growth rate; however, estimation of the growth rate requires fewer assumptions about the disease than R.

 

Even when the overall UK growth rate estimate is negative (below 0), some regions may have growth rate estimates that include ranges that are positive (above 0), for example from -4% to +1%; this does not necessarily mean the epidemic is increasing in that region, just that the uncertainty means it cannot be ruled out. It is also possible that an outbreak in one specific place could result in a positive (above 0) growth rate for the whole region.

 

Estimates of growth rate for geographies smaller than regional level are less reliable and it is more appropriate to identify local hot spots through, for example, monitoring numbers of cases, hospitalisations, and deaths.

 

Published 15 May 2020
Last updated 25 September 2020 (
show all updates)

Link to source

_________________________________________________________

 

image.png

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Press release

COVID-19 Honours

Queen’s Birthday Honours list recognises doctors, nurses, fundraisers and volunteers who have made outstanding contributions to the UK’s coronavirus response.

 

Doctors, nurses, fundraisers and volunteers who have made outstanding contributions to the UK’s coronavirus response will be recognised in the 2020 Queen’s Birthday Honours list on Saturday 10 October.

 

The list, which was due to be published in June, was postponed in order to consider nominations for people playing crucial roles during the first months of the COVID-19 effort.

 

Now, following approval from Her Majesty the Queen, hundreds of additional people will be honoured for their contributions tackling the virus on the frontline and in their communities. They will appear alongside recipients that were already due to be recognised for a broad range of achievements before the pandemic.

 

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said:

"As we all redouble our efforts to control the virus, protect the NHS and save lives this Winter, I am pleased we have an opportunity to recognise those who have given so much to this country already."

"The coronavirus pandemic is the greatest health challenge in our lifetime. We all have to play our part, but the dedication, courage and compassion seen from these recipients, be it responding on the frontline or out in their communities providing support to the most vulnerable, is an inspiration to us all."

"We owe them a debt of gratitude and the 2020 Queen’s Birthday honours will be the first of many occasions where we can thank them as a nation."

 

This year’s bumper list follows the Prime Minister’s call in May for nominations for those going over and above in response to the pandemic.

 

As the first list to incorporate COVID-19 nominations during the ongoing pandemic, the 2020 Queen’s Birthday list has prioritised frontline and community heroes. These recipients, like Captain Sir Tom Moore, are outstanding examples of the contributions which still being made right across the UK, and are symbolic of the ongoing, collective national effort.

 

The honours system is just one of the ways in which tribute will be paid to people across the country for their efforts in response to COVID-19.

 

Published 27 September 2020

Link to source

________________________________________________________

Press release

New legal duty to self-isolate comes into force today

Legal duty to self-isolate comes into force today, to ensure compliance and reduce spread of COVID-19

  • Support is now available for people on low incomes who are unable to work while self-isolating through the £500 Test and Trace Support Payment
  • Fines for those breaking the rules now in place starting at £1,000 and increasing up to £10,000 for repeat offenders

 

From today (Monday 28 September) people across England will be required by law to self-isolate if they test positive or are contacted by NHS Test and Trace.

 

Those on lower incomes who cannot work from home and have lost income as a result will also be eligible for a new £500 Test and Trace Support Payment.

 

Local Authorities will be working quickly to set up Test and Trace Support Payment schemes and we expect them to be in place by 12 October. Those who are told to self-isolate from today will receive backdated payments, if they are eligible, once the scheme is set up in their Local Authority.

 

Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said:

"Anyone can catch coronavirus and anyone can spread it. We all have a crucial part to play in keeping the number of new infections down and protecting our loved ones."

"As cases rise it is imperative we take action, and we are introducing a legal duty to self-isolate when told to do so, with fines for breaches and a new £500 support payment for those on lower incomes who can’t work from home while they are self-isolating."

"These simple steps can make a huge difference to reduce the spread of the virus, but we will not hesitate to put in place further measures if cases continue to rise."

 

As the infection is now spreading rapidly again, these new measures will help ensure compliance and reduce the spread of COVID-19.

 

A number of steps will also be taken to make sure that people are complying with the rules. These include:

  • NHS Test and Trace call handlers increasing contact with those self-isolating;
  • Using police resources to check compliance in highest incidence areas and in high-risk groups, based on local intelligence;
  • Investigating and prosecuting high-profile and egregious cases of non-compliance; and
  • Acting on instances where third parties have identified others who have tested positive, but are not self-isolating.

Recognising that self-isolation is one of the most powerful tools for controlling the transmission of COVID-19, this new Test and Trace Support payment of £500 will ensure that those on low incomes are able to self-isolate without worry about their finances.

 

Just under 4 million people who are in receipt of benefits in England will be eligible for this payment, which will be available to those who have been notified that they must self-isolate from today

 

Home Secretary Priti Patel said:

"These new measures are about saving lives. Everyone must take personal responsibility and self-isolate if they test positive or if told to do so by NHS Test and Trace."

"For those who fail to do so, the police will enforce the law. These new fines are a clear sign that we will not allow those who break the rules to reverse the hard-won progress made by the law-abiding majority."

 

Local Government Secretary Rt Hon Robert Jenrick MP said:

"Councils across the country are working at pace to set up new self-isolation support payment schemes and ensure people in their communities have the information and advice they need to stay safe and reduce the spread of the virus."

"Since the start of the pandemic councils have played a crucial role in supporting businesses and their communities, and I want to thank them for their hard work as they roll out this new support for those who need to self-isolate."

 

Fines will also be introduced from today for those breaching self-isolation rules, starting at £1,000, in line with the existing penalty for breaking quarantine after international travel. This could increase to up to £10,000 for repeat offences and the most serious breaches, including for those preventing others from self-isolating.

 

Employers who force or allow staff to come to work when they should be self-isolating will also be liable for fines of up to £10,000, sending a clear message that this will not be tolerated.

 

If someone or another member of their household has symptoms of coronavirus, they should, as now, isolate immediately. If someone receives a positive test result, they are now required by law to self-isolate for the period ending 10 days after displaying symptoms or after the date of the test, if they did not have symptoms. Other members of their household must self-isolate for the period ending 14 days after symptom onset, or after the date of the initial person’s positive test.

 

If someone is instructed to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace, because they have had close contact with someone outside their household who has tested positive, they are legally required to self-isolate for the period notified by NHS Test and Trace. Both household and non-household contacts must self-isolate for the full period, regardless of whether they have symptoms and, if they develop symptoms and take a test, regardless of whether any test taken gives a negative result.

 

Further information

Individuals will receive this payment on top of any Statutory Sick Pay or benefits they receive. Currently individuals in employment who are self-isolating and cannot work from home are entitled to Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) if they earn more than £120 a week from a single employer. Depending on their circumstances, they might also be able to claim Universal Credit and/ or new style Employment and Support Allowance.

 

The criteria for self-isolation payment is:

  • have been instructed to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace, either because they’ve tested positive or are the close contact of a positive case;
  • are employed or self-employed
  • are unable to work from home and will lose income as a result;
  • are currently receiving Universal Credit, Working Tax Credit, income-based Employment and Support Allowance, income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance, Income Support, Housing Benefit and/or Pension Credit

This will initially be England-only, but we are engaging with DAs to explore opportunities for a UK-wide scheme delivered through LAs, seeking as much alignment as possible.

 

Councils will also have discretion to make payments to those who don’t receive the qualifying benefits, but are on a low income and could suffer financial hardship as a result of not being able to work.

 

As per the current guidance, the legal obligation to self-isolate will afford specific exemptions including for those who need to escape from illness or harm during their isolation, and those that require care.

 

Local Authorities will focus on the principle of encouraging, educating and supporting self-compliance. Where there is clear evidence that someone is not following the rules, the police will determine what follow-up action to take.

 

Users of the official NHS COVID-19 contact tracing app are anonymous and we cannot force them to self-isolate or identify them if they are not self-isolating. The app will advise a user to self-isolate if they have come into close contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus. Users should follow that advice to protect their loved ones and stop the spread of the virus.

 

Published 28 September 2020

Link to source

________________________________________________________

 

 

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Speech

Prime Minister's statement on coronavirus (COVID-19): 30 September 2020

 

When I spoke to you all last week I explained that the number of Covid patients going into hospital had doubled in a fortnight and I explained that the rate of infections was climbing steeply.

 

I said that we faced the sad reality that on these figures we could expect many more daily deaths.

 

And so that’s why we announced the package of restrictions and stronger enforcement last week.

 

At the same time we’ve been intensifying the local lockdowns in areas where the disease has been flaring up.

I want to say - I know how tough it is and has been for these communities and I want to pay a particular tribute to the students who are experiencing a first term back at university unlike anything they could have imagined.

 

I can assure you, assure everybody at university, that plans are being put in place to allow students home safely for Christmas.

 

I wish I could tell you tonight that the impact of this package has already begun to appear but it will take time to feed through.

 

And yesterday we saw the biggest rise in daily cases since the pandemic began, today a further 7,108.

 

We’ve also had a tragic increase in the number of daily deaths – with 71 yesterday and again today.

 

And these figures show why our plan is so essential.

 

We now have to stick to it together - and we should stick to it with confidence,

 

because there are many ways in which we are far better prepared than we were in March.

 

We are on track to hit our target of being able to conduct 500,000 tests a day by the end of October,

 

We’re already exceeding the number of tests per capita that are conducted in Germany, France and Spain.

 

We have over 2,000 beds that could be available across seven Nightingale hospitals, and we will be able to go further if needed.

 

We’ve ordered 32 billion items of PPE, and we’ll have a four month stockpile of masks, visors, gowns and other essentials for winter.

 

By December, by the way, we expect UK manufacturers will meet 70 per cent of the demand for PPE compared with just one per cent before the pandemic.

 

And in the last six months we have more than trebled the availability of mechanical ventilators to our NHS across the UK to 31,500.

 

But the best way forwards, to protect the NHS, save lives, to keep our children in school and the economy moving,

is to follow the rules wherever we live.

 

So I want to thank everyone for the fantastic national effort that we are seeing, continuing to see, and no matter how impatient we may be, how fed up we may become, there is only one way of doing this, and that’s by showing a collective forbearance, common sense and willingness to make sacrifices for the safety of others.

 

At this critical moment, when I know people will be wanting to know the details, I will be providing regular updates through these press conferences.

 

And I have to be clear, that if the evidence requires it, we will not hesitate to take further measures that would, I’m afraid, be more costly than the ones we have put into effect now, but if we put in the work together now, then we give ourselves the best possible chance of avoiding that outcome and avoiding further measures.

 

I know some people will think we should give up and let the virus take its course, despite the huge loss of life that would potentially entail.

 

I have to say, I profoundly disagree.

 

And I don’t think it’s what the British people want, I don’t think they want to throw in the sponge, they want to fight and defeat this virus and that is what we are going to do.

 

Even as we fight Covid, it is vital that people get all the treatment they need for other conditions.

 

But I must be clear, if the NHS were to be overwhelmed by covid, then no-one could get any such care.

 

That’s why we must bear down on the virus now, so that we never reach that point, and I am absolutely confident that with ever increased testing, with better treatments and of course with the prospect of a vaccine, we will get through this.

 

So let’s follow the rules, wash our hands, cover our faces, observe social distancing, download the app, as 14 million of you have already done, and together we will fight back against this virus, protect our NHS and save many more lives.

 

Published 30 September 2020

Link to source

________________________________________________________

Policy paper

Slides to accompany coronavirus press conference: 30 September 2020

Press conference slides used by Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty in the coronavirus press conference on 30 September 2020.

Link to slides

 

Published 30 September 2020

Link to source

________________________________________________________

PM Boris Johnson addresses the UK on 30th September 2020.

Link to source

________________________________________________________

 

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Research and analysis

NERVTAG/EMG: Duration of wearing of face coverings, 15 September 2020

 

This was considered at SAGE 57 on 17 September 2020.

 

It should be viewed in context: the paper was the best assessment of the evidence at the time of writing. The picture is developing rapidly and, as new evidence or data emerges, SAGE updates its advice accordingly.

 

Therefore, some of the information in this paper may have been superseded and the author’s opinion or conclusion may since have developed.

 

These documents are released as pre-print publications that have provided the government with rapid evidence during an emergency. These documents have not been peer-reviewed and there is no restriction on authors submitting and publishing this evidence in peer-reviewed journals.

 

Published 2 October 2020

Link to source

________________________________________________________

Guidance

The R number and growth rate in the UK

The latest reproduction number (R) and growth rate of coronavirus (COVID-19) in the UK.

 

Latest R number and growth rate

Latest R number range for the UK 1.3  to  1.6

Latest growth rate range for the UK  +5%   to   +9%  per day

An R number between 1.3 and 1.6 means that on average every 10 people infected will infect between 13 and 16 other people.

A growth rate between +5% and +9% means the number of new infections is growing by 5% to 9% every day.

 

The UK estimates of R and growth rate are averages over very different epidemiological situations and should be regarded as a guide to the general trend rather than a description of the epidemic state.

 

Latest by NHS England regions

These are the latest R and growth rate estimates by NHS England regions.

image.png

 

Latest for devolved administrations

The latest ranges for values in the devolved administrations are published on their respective websites:

 R number Northern Ireland

 R number Scotland

 R number Wales (Cymraeg)

Last updated 2 October 2020

Link to source

________________________________________________________

Press release

1 in 8 people in England have now been tested for coronavirus

One in eight people have now received a coronavirus test at least once since the launch of NHS Test and Trace on 28 May 2020.

Published 2 October 2020

Link to source

________________________________________________________

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

NHS Test and Trace phone number

Be aware that ‘0300 123 7790’ has been removed as a second phone number that NHS Test and Trace may call from.

If NHS Test and Trace calls you by phone, the service will be using the phone number 0300  013  5000.

Contact tracers will call you from 0300 013 5000. Local contact tracers will contact you from a local council number. If you’re unsure if this is genuine, please contact your local council for advice.

Published 3:55pm, 7 October 2020

Link to source

________________________________________________________

Further restrictions a possibility

There are predictions of further measures in England from next week to combat the COVID-19 situation. We will announce the details only when we receive information directly in our daily email updates from GOV.UK

________________________________________________________  

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

image.png

 

 

image.png

Link to source

________________________________________________________  

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oral statement to Parliament

PM Commons statement on coronavirus: 12 October 2020

Mr Speaker, with your permission, I will make a statement on our continuing fight against coronavirus and how we intend to fulfil our simultaneous objectives saving lives, protecting the NHS while keeping our children in school and our economy running, and protecting jobs and livelihoods.

This morning the Deputy Chief Medical Officer set out the stark reality of the second wave of this virus the number of cases has quadrupled in the last three weeks there are now more people in hospital with Covid than when we went into lockdown on March 23, and deaths are already rising and of course there are those who say that on that logic we should go back into a full national lockdown of indefinite duration, closing schools and businesses, telling people again to stay at home as we did in March, once again shuttering our lives and our society. I do not believe that would be the right course.

We would not only be depriving our children of their education, we would do such damage to our economy as to erode our long term ability to fund the NHS and other crucial public services. And on the other side of the argument there are those who think that the patience of the public is now exhausted and that we should abandon the fight against Covid stand aside, let nature take her course, and call a halt to these repressions of liberty, and of course I understand those emotions.

I understand the frustration of those who have been chafing under the restrictions, the sacrifices they have made. But if we were to follow that course Mr Speaker, and let the virus rip, then the bleak mathematics dictate that we would suffer not only an intolerable death toll from Covid, We would put such huge strain on our NHS, with an uncontrolled second spike that our doctors and nurses would be simply unable to devote themselves to the other treatments for cancer, for heart disease and hundreds more that have already been delayed and that would be delayed again with serious long term damage to the health of the nation and I am afraid it is no answer to say that we could let the virus take hold among the young and fit while shielding the elderly and vulnerable

because the virus would then spread with such velocity in the general population that there would be no way of stopping it from spreading among the elderly, and even if the virus is less lethal for the under 60s. There will still be many younger people for whom, alas, it remains lethal. 

So Mr Speaker, we don’t want to go back to another national lockdown. We can’t let the virus rip, and so we have followed since June a balanced approach with the support of many Members across the House

to keeping the R down while keeping schools and the economy going and controlling the virus by changing our behaviour so as to restrict its spread.

That is why we have the Rule of Six, and why we have restrictions such as a 10pm closing time on our hospitality sector.

Mr Speaker, I take no pleasure whatsoever in imposing restrictions on these businesses, many of which have gone to great lengths to reopen as safely as possible. Nor do I want to stop people enjoying themselves, but we must act to save lives. And the evidence shows that in changing our behaviour, in restricting transmission between us our actions are saving lives.

Left unchecked each person with the virus will infect on average between 2.7 and 3 others but SAGE assess that the current R nationally is between 1.2 and 1.5. So we are already suppressing that R to well below its natural level which is why the virus is not spreading as quickly as it did in March. But we need to go further.

In recent months, we have worked with local leaders to counter local spikes with targeted restrictions. But this local approach has inevitably produced different sets of rules in different parts of the country that are now complex to understand and enforce.

So just as we simplified our national rules with the Rule of Six, we will now simplify and standardise our local rules by introducing a three tiered system of local Covid Alert Levels in England - set at medium, high, and very high.

 

The “medium” alert level, which will cover most of the country, and will consist of the current national measures.

This includes the Rule of Six and the closure of hospitality at 10pm.

 

The “high” alert level reflects the interventions in many local areas at the moment.

This primarily aims to reduce household to household transmission, by preventing all mixing between different households or support bubbles indoors.

In these areas, the Rule of Six will continue to apply outdoors, where it is harder for the virus to spread, in public spaces as well as private gardens.

Most areas which are already subject to local restrictions will automatically move into the “high” alert level.

As a result of rising infection rates, Nottinghamshire, East and West Cheshire and a small area of High Peak will also move into the “high” alert level.

 

The “very high” alert level will apply where transmission rates are rising most rapidly and where the NHS could soon be under unbearable pressure without further restrictions.

In these areas the government will set a baseline of prohibiting social mixing indoors and in private gardens

and, I’m sorry to say, closing pubs and bars. We want to create the maximum possible local consensus behind this more severe local action, so in each area, we will work with local government leaders on the additional measures which should be taken.

This could lead to further restrictions on the hospitality, leisure, entertainment or personal care sectors, but retail, schools and universities will remain open.

 

As my Rt Hon Friend the Chancellor has set out, the government will expand its unprecedented economic support to assist those affected by these decisions extending our Job Support Scheme to cover two-thirds of the wages of those in any business that is required to close, and providing those businesses with a cash grant of up to £3,000 a month, instead of £1500 every three weeks. we will also provide Local Authorities across England with around £1 billion of new financial support, on top of our £3.6 billion Towns Fund.

And for very high areas, we will give further financial support for local test and trace, and local enforcement

and assistance from the armed forces – not for enforcement but rather to support local services, if desired in the local area.

Mr Speaker, I can report that we have been able to reach agreement with leaders in Merseyside.

Local Authorities in the Liverpool City Region will move into the “very high” alert level from Wednesday.

In addition to the baseline I have outlined, that is as well as pubs and bars, in Merseyside gyms and leisure centres, betting shops, adult gaming centres and casinos will also close.

I would like to put on record my thanks to Steve Rotheram and his colleagues for their cooperation in very difficult circumstances.

Engagement with other leaders in the North West, the North East and Yorkshire & Humber is continuing.

I know how difficult this is – they, like everyone in the House, are grappling with very real dilemmas - but we cannot let the NHS fall over when lives are at stake.

So let me repeat the offer that we are making to those local authorities – work with us on these difficult but necessary measures in the areas that are rated very high areas, in return for:

  • more support for local test and trace
  • more funding for local enforcement
  • the offer of help from the armed services
  • the job support scheme as announced by the Chancellor

I believe not to act would be unforgivable, so I hope that rapid progress can be made in the coming days.

Regulations for all three Covid local alert levels are being laid today. They will be debated and voted on tomorrow, before coming into force on Wednesday.

We will also keep these measures under constant review, including a four-week sunset clause for interventions in “very high” areas.

A postcode search on gov.uk, as well as the NHS Covid-19 app, will show which local alert level applies in each area and we are also publishing updated guidance to explain what the Covid alert levels mean for those who are clinically extremely vulnerable.

And while these levels specifically apply to England, we continue work closely with the Devolved Administrations to tackle this virus across the whole of United Kingdom.

Mr Speaker, this is not how we want to live our lives, but this is the narrow path we have to tread between the social and economic trauma of a full lockdown and the massive human and indeed economic cost of an uncontained epidemic. With local and regional and national government coming together in a shared responsibility

and a shared effort to deliver ever better testing and tracing, ever more efficient enforcement of the rules

and with ever improving therapies, with the mountains of PPE and the ventilators that we have stockpiled. 

With all the lessons we have learned in the last few months we are becoming better and better at fighting this virus and though I must warn the House again that the weeks and months ahead will continue to be difficult

and will test the mettle of this country. I have no doubt at all that together we will succeed.

And I commend this statement to the House.

Published 12 October 2020

Link to source

________________________________________________________  

Press release

Prime Minister announces new local COVID Alert Levels

 

The Prime Minister has today set out how the government will further simplify and standardise local rules by introducing a three tiered system of local COVID Alert Levels in England.

 

Addressing MPs before hosting a Downing Street press conference, he confirmed the levels will be set at medium, high, and very high.

 

He set out how this new approach will be simpler and standardised, and thanked local leaders who have engaged with the government over the weekend.

 

Local COVID Alert Level - Medium

This is for areas where national restrictions continue to be in place.

This means:

  • All businesses and venues can continue to operate, in a COVID-Secure manner, other than those that remain closed in law, such as nightclubs.
  • Certain businesses selling food or drink on their premises are required to close between 10pm and 5am.
  • Businesses and venues selling food for consumption off the premises can continue to do so after 10pm as long as this is through delivery service, click-and-collect or drive-thru.
  • Schools, universities and places of worship remain open.
  • Weddings and funerals can go ahead with restrictions on the number of attendees.
  • Organised indoor sport and exercise classes can continue to take place, provided the Rule of Six is followed.
  • People must not meet in groups larger than 6, indoors or outdoors.

 

Local COVID Alert Level - High

  • This is for areas with a higher level of infections. This means the following additional measures are in place:
  • People must not meet with anybody outside their household or support bubble in any indoor setting, whether at home or in a public place
  • People must not meet in a group of more than 6 outside, including in a garden or other space.
  • People should aim to reduce the number of journeys they make where possible. If they need to travel, they should walk or cycle where possible, or to plan ahead and avoid busy times and routes on public transport.

Local COVID Alert Level - Very High

This is for areas with a very high level of infections. The Government will set a baseline of measures for any area in this local alert level. Consultation with local authorities will determine additional measures.

The baseline means the below additional measures are in place:

  • Pubs and bars must close, and can only remain open where they operate as if they were a restaurant - which means serving substantial meals, like a main lunchtime or evening meal. They may only serve alcohol as part of such a meal.
  • Wedding receptions are not allowed
  • People must not meet with anybody outside their household or support bubble in any indoor or outdoor setting, whether at home or in a public space. The Rule of Six applies in open public spaces like parks and beaches.
  • People should try to avoid travelling outside the ‘Very High’ area they are in, or entering a ‘Very High’ area, other than for things like work, education, accessing youth services, to meet caring responsibilities or if they are in transit.
  • People should avoid staying overnight in another part of the UK if they are resident in a ‘Very High’ area, or avoid staying overnight in a ‘Very High’ area if they are resident elsewhere.

Full list of Local COVID Alert Levels by area

 

Local COVID Alert Level: Medium

England

  • All areas, excluding those listed below

Local COVID Alert Level: High

Cheshire

  • Cheshire West and Chester
  • Cheshire East

Greater Manchester

  • Manchester
  • Bolton
  • Bury
  • Stockport
  • Tameside
  • Trafford
  • Wigan
  • Salford
  • Rochdale
  • Oldham

Warrington

  • Warrington

Derbyshire

High Peak - the wards of:

  • Tintwistle
  • Padfield
  • Dinting
  • St John’s
  • Old Glossop
  • Whitfield
  • Simmondley
  • Gamesley
  • Howard Town
  • Hadfield South
  • Hadfield North

Lancashire

  • Blackpool
  • Blackburn with Darwen
  • Burnley
  • Chorley
  • Fylde
  • Hyndburn
  • Lancaster
  • Pendle
  • Preston
  • Ribble Valley
  • Rossendale
  • South Ribble
  • West Lancashire
  • Wyre

West Yorkshire

  • Leeds
  • Bradford
  • Kirklees
  • Calderdale
  • Wakefield

South Yorkshire

  • Barnsley
  • Rotherham
  • Doncaster
  • Sheffield

North East

  • Newcastle
  • South Tyneside
  • North Tyneside
  • Gateshead
  • Sunderland
  • Durham
  • Northumberland

Tees Valley

  • Middlesbrough
  • Redcar and Cleveland
  • Stockton-on-Tees
  • Darlington
  • Hartlepool

West Midlands

  • Birmingham
  • Sandwell
  • Solihull
  • Wolverhampton
  • Walsall

Leicester

  • Leicester
  • Oadby and Wigston

Nottingham

  • Nottinghamshire
  • Nottingham City

Local COVID Alert Level: Very High

Liverpool City Region

  • Liverpool
  • Knowsley
  • Wirral
  • St Helens
  • Sefton
  • Halton

Published 12 October 2020

Link to source

________________________________________________________  

Guidance

Local COVID alert levels: what you need to know

These rules will apply from 00.01 on Wednesday 14 October 2020. You must follow the current guidance until then.

 

What local COVID alert levels mean

Local COVID alert levels set out information for local authorities, residents and workers about what to do and how to manage the outbreak in their area.

Find out what you can and cannot do if you live, work or travel in each local COVID alert level.

Check the local COVID alert level of your local area to see which level applies to you.

 

Why the government is introducing local COVID alert levels

The government is committed to ensuring the right levels of intervention in the right places to manage outbreaks. Working with local authorities through the contain framework, our approach has been simplified so that there are now 3 local COVID alert levels.

 

Local COVID alert level: medium

This is for areas where national restrictions continue to be in place.

This means:

  • you must not socialise in groups larger than 6, indoors or outdoors (other than where a legal exemption applies)
  • businesses and venues can continue to operate, in a COVID-secure manner, other than those that remain closed in law
  • certain businesses are required to ensure customers only consume food and drink while seated, and must close between 10pm and 5am
  • businesses and venues selling food for consumption off the premises can continue to do so after 10pm as long as this is through delivery service, click-and-collect or drive-through
  • schools and universities remain open
  • places of worship remain open, subject to the rule of 6
  • weddings and funerals can go ahead with restrictions on numbers of attendees
  • exercise classes and organised sport can continue to take place outdoors, or indoors if the rule of 6 is followed

You must:

You should continue to:

  • follow social distancing rules
  • work from home where you can effectively do so
  • when travelling, plan ahead or avoid busy times and routes. Walk or cycle if you can

Find out more about the measures that apply in medium alert level areas to help reduce the spread of COVID-19

 

Local COVID alert level: high

This is for areas with a higher level of infections where some additional restrictions are in place.

This means on top of restrictions in alert level medium:

  • you must not socialise with anybody outside of your household or support bubble in any indoor setting, whether at home or in a public place
  • you must not socialise in a group of more than 6 outside, including in a garden or other spaces like beaches or parks (other than where specific exemptions apply in law)
  • businesses and venues can continue to operate, in a COVID-secure manner, other than those that remain closed in law
  • certain businesses are required to ensure customers only consume food and drink while seated, and must close between 10pm and 5am
  • businesses and venues selling food for consumption off the premises can continue to do so after 10pm as long as this is through delivery service, click-and-collect or drive-through
  • schools, universities and places of worship remain open
  • weddings and funerals can go ahead with restrictions on the number of attendees
  • exercise classes and organised sport can continue to take place outdoors. These will only be permitted indoors if it is possible for people to avoid mixing with people they do not live with or share a support bubble with, or for youth or disability sport
  • you can continue to travel to venues or amenities that are open, for work or to access education, but should look to reduce the number of journeys you make where possible

You must:

You should continue to:

  • follow social distancing rules
  • work from home where you can effectively do so
  • walk or cycle where possible, or plan ahead and avoid busy times and routes on public transport

Find out more about the measures that apply in high alert level areas to help reduce the spread of COVID-19

 

Local COVID alert level: very high

This is for areas with a very high level of infections and where tighter restrictions are in place. The restrictions placed on areas with a very high level of infections can vary, and are based on discussions between central and local government. You should therefore check the specific rules in your area.

At a minimum, this means:

  • you must not socialise with anybody you do not live with, or have formed a support bubble with, in any indoor setting or in any private garden or at most outdoor hospitality venues and ticketed events
  • you must not socialise in a group of more than 6 in an outdoor public space such as a park or beach, the countryside, a public garden or a sports venue
  • pubs and bars must close. They can only remain open where they operate as if they were a restaurant, which means serving substantial meals, like a main lunchtime or evening meal. They may only serve alcohol as part of such a meal
  • schools and universities remain open
  • places of worship remain open, but household mixing is not permitted
  • weddings and funerals can go ahead with restrictions on the number of attendees. However, wedding receptions are not allowed
  • exercise classes and organised sport can continue to take place outdoors. These will only be permitted indoors if it is possible for people to avoid mixing with people they do not live with (or share a support bubble with), or for youth or disability sport
  • you should try to avoid travelling outside the very-high alert level area you are in or entering a very-high alert level area, other than for things like work, education or youth services, to meet caring responsibilities or if you are travelling through as part of a longer journey
  • you should avoid staying overnight in another part of the UK if you are resident in a very-high alert level area, or avoid staying overnight in a very-high alert level area if you are resident elsewhere

You must:

You should continue to:

  • follow social distancing rules
  • work from home where you can effectively do so
  • travel to venues or amenities that are open, for work or to access education, but aim to reduce the number of journeys you make

This is the baseline in very-high alert level areas. The government will also seek to agree additional interventions in consultation with local authorities, in order to drive down transmission of the virus. These could include the following options:

  • restrictions preventing the sale of alcohol in hospitality or closing all hospitality (except takeaway and delivery)
  • closing indoor and outdoor entertainment venues and tourist attractions
  • closing venues such as leisure centres and gyms (while ensuring provision remains available for elite athletes, youth and disabled sport and physical activity)
  • closing public buildings, such as libraries and community centres (while ensuring provision remains available for youth and childcare activities and support groups)
  • closing personal care and close contact services or prohibiting the highest-risk activities
  • closing performing arts venues for the purposes of performing to audiences

You should therefore check whether additional restrictions apply in your area.

Find out more about the measures that apply in very high alert level areas to help reduce the spread of COVID-19

Published 12 October 2020

Link to source

________________________________________________________  

 

Hands Face Space - logo.jpg

 

In all areas of England, you should make sure you remember ‘Hands. Face. Space’:

 

HANDS – wash your hands regularly and for 20 seconds

 

FACE – wear a face covering in indoor settings where social distancing may be difficult, and where you will come into contact with people you do not normally meet

 

SPACE – stay 2 metres apart from people you do not live with where possible, or 1 metre with extra precautions in place (such as wearing face coverings or increasing ventilation indoors)

 

This guidance is for the general public who are fit and well. 

 

Published 12 October 2020

Link to source

________________________________________________________  

image.png

Published 12 October 2020

Link to source

________________________________________________________  

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...