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Testing capacity for COVID-19

In early May, the government set out another challenge to increase testing capacity to 200,000 tests per day by the end of May. This target was met on 29 May and continues to be met daily.

 

Deaths

As of 5pm on 15 August, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 41,366 have died across all settings within 28 days of that test.

Of that 41,366 just 5 (five) passed away on 14 August 2020.

 

Last updated 16 August 2020

Link to source data

 

Press release

Public encouraged to register for COVID-19 vaccine trials as 100,000 already sign-up

Over 100,000 people have volunteered to take part in COVID-19 vaccine trials, helping to speed up efforts to discover a safe and effective vaccine.

  • Over 100,000 people have signed up for future COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials through the NHS COVID-19 vaccine research registry
  • volunteers are helping speed up efforts to find a safe and effective vaccine in the fight against coronavirus
  • UK researchers urge more volunteers across all groups to sign-up, especially the over 65s and those from Black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds

 

Over 100,000 people have volunteered to take part in COVID-19 vaccine trials, helping to speed up efforts to discover a safe and effective vaccine.

 

The government is today (Monday 17 August) encouraging more people to join the thousands of volunteers and sign up to the NHS COVID-19 Vaccine Research Registry to help the NHS in the fight against coronavirus and ensure potential candidates work for everyone.

 

To enable large-scale vaccine studies to take place across the UK, the aim is to get as many people as possible signed up to the Registry by October.

 

Researchers particularly welcome people from all parts of society, especially those who are more likely to benefit from a vaccine, including the over 65s, frontline health and social care workers, and those from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic backgrounds.

 

Clinical studies with a diverse pool of volunteers will help scientists and researchers better understand the effectiveness of each vaccine candidate and will considerably speed up efforts to discover a safe and workable vaccine.

 

Business Secretary Alok Sharma said:

"From John O’Groats to Land’s End, everyone has played their part in tackling coronavirus from wearing face coverings to following social distancing guidance."

"Scientists and researchers are working day and night to find a vaccine that meets the UK’s rigorous regulatory and safety standards, but they need hundreds of thousands of people of all backgrounds and ages to sign-up for studies to speed up this vital research."

"I urge everyone to play our part in the fight against coronavirus and join the 100,000 people who have already registered, so we can help save and protect millions of lives."

 

Chair of the government’s Vaccines Taskforce Kate Bingham said:

"Protecting those at risk is the only way we will end this pandemic. That’s why we are working as quickly as possible to run clinical studies on the most promising vaccines to see whether they offer protection against COVID-19, whilst adhering to the UK’s strict safety and regulatory processes. And we need people throughout the UK to sign up to the registry to help us achieve this."

"Getting 100,000 volunteers on board is a great start but we need many more people from many different backgrounds that we can call on for future studies if we are to find a vaccine quickly to protect those who need it against coronavirus."

 

Consultant Respiratory Physician and Director of the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) PRC, Bradford, Dinesh Saralaya said:

"The best way to protect us from future outbreaks is to develop effective vaccines. Several vaccine trials are being conducted around the UK in the coming months and it is important that we all sign up to be contacted about them.

I would like to reassure people that research trials and studies are strictly regulated for ethics and safety. They are conducted within the framework of the NIHR, which is the research partner of the NHS, and we take every precaution to safeguard participants taking part. This includes appointments in settings like sports halls close to where people live and work rather than in hospitals."

"By working together, we can produce efficient vaccines which are likely to protect all sections of our society from this dreadful virus in future."

 

18-year-old Marium Zumeer from Bradford, who was hospitalised after contracting COVID-19, has first-hand experience of the benefits of taking part in clinical trials. During her time in intensive care, she was offered the opportunity to take part in the national RECOVERY trial, which is testing a range of potential treatments for COVID-19. This includes the drug dexamethasone, which was found to be the first drug to be effective when treating those who are critically ill with the virus.

 

RECOVERY trial volunteer Marium Zumeer said:

"I will always be grateful for being encouraged to sign up. I remember my dad at the time urging me to take part, not just for myself but for the wider community. The result has been really positive for me and I would encourage others to do their bit in helping us all in the fight against coronavirus."

 

Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty said:

"I’m very grateful to those who have volunteered for researchers to contact them to take part in COVID-19 vaccine studies, via the NHS COVID-19 vaccine research registry. The more people who volunteer to take part the more likely we find an answer to whether any vaccine is effective."

"Having 100,000 volunteers in just four weeks shows the selflessness of the public and is testament to the speed of work done by the Vaccines Taskforce, National Institute for Health Research and others to make signing up possible.

I urge people to continue to sign up. It is important that we have people from different backgrounds and ages as volunteers, so that the vaccines that are developed work for everyone."

 

A number of trials in the UK are expected to begin this autumn, working with the NHS, research institutions and businesses, helping to develop and manufacture the vaccines.

 

Launched on 20 July, the NHS COVID-19 Vaccine Research Registry is an online service allowing members of the public to register their interest in COVID-19 vaccine studies and be contacted to participate in future clinical trials.

 

Vaccines are tested in stages to ensure they are safe and effective. Volunteers who are contacted to take part in trials will be given information about what stage a particular vaccine is at and details of how it has already been tested. They will be able to consider this when deciding to take part and people can withdraw from the registry at any point.

 

The Registry has been developed by the government, in partnership with the NIHR, NHS Digital, the Scottish and Welsh governments and the Northern Ireland Executive.

 

Published 17 August 2020

Link to source data


Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

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Guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): how to self-isolate when you travel to the UK

 

When you arrive in the UK, you will not be allowed to leave the place where you’re staying for the first 14 days you’re in the UK (known as ‘self-isolating’) unless you’re arriving from an exempt country.

 

This is because it can take up to 14 days for coronavirus symptoms to appear. If you’re travelling to the UK for less than 14 days, you will be expected to self-isolate for the length of your stay.

 

If you’re travelling from an exempt country you will not need to self-isolate. You should check the list of exempt countries before you travel. If you travel from an exempt country but have been in a country that is not exempt within the last 14 days, you will need to self-isolate for the remainder of the 14 days since you were last in a non-exempt country.

 

You should follow separate advice if you need to self-isolate in:

Before you travel to the UK from anywhere outside the Common Travel Area, you should provide your journey, contact details and the address where you will self-isolate. You will be able to complete the public health passenger locator form 48 hours before you arrive. You must present these details on your arrival in England.

 

:excl:

You may be refused permission to enter the UK (if you are not a British citizen), or fined if you do not to provide your contact details or do not self-isolate, unless you arrive in the UK from an exempt country.

 

In England, if you do not self-isolate, you can be fined £1,000. If you do not provide an accurate contact detail declaration – or do not update your contact detail form in the limited circumstances where you need to move from the accommodation where you’re self-isolating to another place to continue self-isolating – you can be fined up to £3,200.

 

Who must self-isolate

These rules are for UK residents and all visitors coming into the UK.

 

You will need to complete a public health passenger locator form unless you are travelling within the Common Travel Area, and have been in the Common Travel Area for the past 14 days. If you’ve been outside the Common Travel Area at any time in the last 14 days you will need to complete a public health passenger locator form.

 

You do not need to self-isolate if you’re travelling from an exempt country and have been in an exempt country for the last 14 days. You should check the list of exempt countries before you travel. Exempt countries include all parts of the UK, the Republic of Ireland, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.

 

If you travel from an exempt country but have been in a country that is not exempt within the last 14 days, you will need to self-isolate for the remainder of the 14 days since you were in a non-exempt country. If you transit through a country that is not exempt you will be required to self-isolate for 14 days.

 

For example, if you arrive in the UK from a country that is exempt, but you travelled to the exempt country 4 days ago from a country that is not exempt you will need to self-isolate for 10 days. If you’re travelling to the UK for less than 10 days you will need to self-isolate for the length of your stay.

 

There are other reasons why you might not need to self-isolate. Read the detailed guidance on who does not need to self-isolate.

 

If you are exempt, you will still need to stay alert and stay safe.

 

Why self-isolating is important

When you arrive in the UK, it is very important that you stay in your declared accommodation for 14 days. It can take up to 14 days for you to develop coronavirus symptoms after you catch the virus and in this time you can unknowingly pass it on to others, even if you don’t have symptoms.

 

Self-isolating will reduce the chance of a second wave of coronavirus in the UK and help prevent family, friends and the community from contracting coronavirus, as well as helping to protect the NHS.

 

Arrivals from countries that are exempt from the requirement will not be required to self-isolate, because they’re travelling from places that have been assessed as low risk.

 

How to travel to the place where you are self-isolating

If you develop coronavirus symptoms when you’re travelling to the UK, you should tell one of the crew on your plane, boat, train or bus. They’ll let staff in the airport, port or station know, so they can tell you what you should do next when you arrive.

 

When you arrive in the UK, go straight to the place you’re staying.

 

Only use public transport if you have no other option. If you do use public transport, wear something that covers your nose and mouth and stay 2 metres apart from other people. Pack a face covering or scarf to cover your nose and mouth before you travel. If you have coronavirus symptoms, you will not be allowed to travel by public transport and will need to demonstrate that the accommodation where you will self-isolate is safe.

 

If necessary, and you have a long journey within the UK to arrive at your self-isolation accommodation, you can stop overnight in safe accommodation before continuing your journey. You must self-isolate and provide the address of your overnight stop on your public health passenger locator form in addition to your declared accommodation address.

 

How to self-isolate in your accommodation

You should self-isolate in one place for the full 14 days, where you can have food and other necessities delivered, and stay away from others. You must self-isolate at the address you provided on the public health passenger locator form.

 

This can include:

  • your own home
  • staying with friends or family
  • a hotel or other temporary accommodation

You should not have visitors, including friends and family, unless they are providing:

  • emergency assistance
  • care or assistance, including personal care
  • medical assistance
  • veterinary services
  • certain critical public services

You cannot go out to work or school or visit public areas. You should not go shopping. If you require help buying groceries, other shopping or picking up medication, you should ask friends or relatives or order a delivery.

In England, you must only exercise within your home or garden. You cannot leave your home to walk your dog. You will need to ask friends or relatives to help you with this.

 

NHS Volunteer Responders are also available if you need help collecting shopping, medication or would like a telephone ‘check-in and chat’. Call 0808 196 3646 (8am to 8pm) to arrange volunteer support. You can arrange one-off support, or schedule more regular help whilst you are self-isolating.

 

In England, you can only leave your accommodation in limited circumstances. These include where:

  • you need urgent medical assistance (or where your doctor has advised you to get medical assistance)
  • you need access to basic necessities like food and medicines, but only in exceptional circumstances such as where you cannot arrange for these to be delivered
  • you need to access critical public services such as social services and victim support services, but only in exceptional circumstances
  • you need to go to the funeral of a family member of someone you live with
  • you need to visit a dying or critically ill family member or someone you live with
  • you need to fulfil a legal obligation such as participate in legal proceedings
  • there’s an emergency

You are not allowed to change the place where you are self-isolating except in very limited circumstances, including where:

  • a legal obligation requires you to change address, such as where you are a child whose parents live separately, and you need to move between homes as part of a shared custody agreement
  • it is necessary for you to stay overnight at accommodation before travelling to the place where you will be self-isolating for the remainder of the 14 days
  • there’s an emergency

If this happens, you should provide full details of each address where you will self-isolate on the public health passenger locator form. If, in exceptional circumstances, you cannot remain where you are staying, you must update the form as soon as possible.

 

Support to help you self-isolate in your own accommodation

The people you’re staying with do not need to self-isolate, unless they travelled with you or you develop symptoms of coronavirus.

 

If you cannot safely self-isolate for 14 days, you should tell Border Force Officers when you pass through UK border controls. They will provide you with details of a booking service which you can use to obtain accommodation and self-isolate in at your own expense. Staying at home may be difficult, frustrating or lonely, but there are things that you can do to help make it easier.

 

NHS Volunteer Responders are also on hand to have a friendly chat. If you would like a telephone ‘check in and chat’ please call 0808 196 3646 (8am to 8pm) to arrange volunteer support.

 

Read information on your employment rights on return to the UK following a period of travel.

 

Within your accommodation

The people you’re staying with do not need to stay at home, unless they travelled with you.

 

If you’re staying in a hotel or guest house, you must stay away from others who didn’t travel with you, so it’s important that you don’t use shared areas such as bars, restaurants, health clubs and sports facilities. Stay 2 metres apart from other people staying there at all times.

 

It’s important to avoid as much contact with other people as possible in your home in order to reduce the risk of transmitting coronavirus. You should stay in a well-ventilated room with a window to the outside that can be opened, separate from other people in your home.

 

Washing your hands and keeping good hygiene

Everyone should wash their hands regularly, but this is particularly important for people who have recently travelled to the UK because you could have contracted coronavirus and not yet developed symptoms. Wash your hands frequently with soap and hot water, for at least 20 seconds, rinse and dry thoroughly. Use alcohol-based hand sanitiser if soap and water are not available. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.

 

Cover your mouth and nose with a disposable tissue when you cough or sneeze. Dispose of tissues into a plastic waste bag, and immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, rinse and dry thoroughly.

 

After self-isolating for 14 days

If you do not have any coronavirus symptoms after 14 days, you can stop self-isolating. You will then need to follow the same rules as people who live in the UK. Check the rules for the part of the UK you’re staying in:

What to do if you get coronavirus symptoms

You should look for any of the following symptoms in the 14 days after the day you arrive in the UK:

  • new continuous cough
  • high temperature
  • loss or change to your sense of smell or taste

If you have any of these symptoms, you should continue to self-isolate at home. If you are staying with others and you develop symptoms, the whole household that you are staying with will need to begin self-isolating.

 

You should apply for a test if you have the symptoms of coronavirus. You can register for a test on the NHS website. If you have no internet access, you should call NHS 119 to arrange for a test.

 

If your test for coronavirus is positive you will be asked to share your contacts with the NHS test and trace service, and your contact detail declaration may be used to alert people who travelled to the UK alongside you.

 

If you feel you cannot cope with your symptoms at home, or your condition gets worse, or your symptoms do not get better after 10 days, then use the NHS 111 online coronavirus (COVID-19) service. If you do not have internet access, call NHS 111. For a medical emergency dial 999.

 

If you develop symptoms, you must self-isolate for at least 14 days from the point you arrived in the UK and if you get symptoms during that time for at least 10 days from symptom onset and until you are better and no longer have a high temperature. You will need to self-isolate for 14 days from the time that you arrived in the UK even if you have had and recovered from coronavirus symptoms in this time. If you are tested and receive a negative result for coronavirus, you must continue to self-isolate until you have been in the UK for 14 days, even if your symptoms have gone.

 

If you arrived in the UK more than 14 days ago, you do not need to continue self-isolation once you have had symptoms for 10 days and your temperature has returned to normal. Symptoms of a cough or changes to your sense of smell or taste can last for several weeks after the infection has gone and so you can stop self-isolating even if you have these symptoms. The household you are staying with should self-isolate for 14 days from the point that your symptoms start.

 

If you develop new symptoms or your existing symptoms worsen within your 14-day isolation period, then please contact NHS 111 again and follow their advice.

 

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Exemptions

A small proportion of people travelling to the UK to maintain essential supply chains, critical national infrastructure or to contribute to crisis response or other essential government work will not need to self-isolate and some will not need to complete the public health passenger locator form.

 

People travelling from exempt countries will also not need to self-isolate, if they have been in an exempt country for 14 days.

 

If you are a seasonal agricultural worker, you must complete the public health passenger locator form and remain on the farm where you are working and staying for 14 days.

 

Read the list of exemptions to self-isolation requirements.

 

Like everyone in the UK, if you are exempt you should not travel and should immediately self-isolate if you get the symptoms of coronavirus. You should follow guidance to stay alert and work safely.

 

Updated 17 August 2020

Link to source data

See also here


Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

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Press release

Government creates new National Institute for Health Protection

A brand new organisation whose primary focus is public health protection and infectious disease capability is being established by the government.

  • New organisation to focus on rigorous science-led approach to public health protection
  • Institute will boost UK’s ability to deal with and recover from COVID-19 and meet health challenges of the coming winter
  • The organisation will be formalised and be operating from spring 2021

The National Institute for Health Protection (NIHP) will start work immediately, with a single command structure to advance the country’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

From today it will bring together Public Health England (PHE) and NHS Test and Trace, as well as the analytical capability of the Joint Biosecurity Centre (JBC) under a single leadership team. This is the first step towards becoming a single organisation, focused on tackling COVID-19 and protecting the nation’s health.

In order to minimise disruption to the vital work dealing with the pandemic, the organisation will be formalised and operating from spring 2021.

The new organisation will support local directors of public health and local authorities on the frontline of the COVID-19 response.

 

The responsibilities of the NIHP will include:

  • NIHP local health protection teams to deal with infections and other threats
  • support and resources for local authorities to manage local outbreaks
  • the COVID-19 testing programme
  • contact tracing
  • the Joint Biosecurity Centre
  • emergency response and preparedness to deal with the most severe incidents at national and local level
  • research and reference laboratories and associated services
  • specialist epidemiology and surveillance of all infectious diseases
  • the Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards
  • global health security
  • providing specialistic scientific advice on immunisation and countermeasures

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said:

"To give ourselves the best chance of beating this virus once and for all – and of spotting and being ready to respond to other health threats, now and in the future – we are creating a brand new organisation to provide a new approach to public health protection and resilience."

"The National Institute for Health Protection will bring together the expertise of PHE with the enormous response capabilities of NHS Test and Trace and the Joint Biosecurity Centre to put us in the best possible position for the next stage of the fight against COVID-19 and for the long term."

"I want to thank all my brilliant colleagues at Public Health England, the NHS, the Joint Biosecurity Centre, local directors of public health and their teams, contact tracers, diagnostics experts, epidemiologists, infection control teams, and every single person who has contributed to the national effort to get this deadly pandemic under control over the last 8 months."

"I would like to personally thank Duncan Selbie for his leadership of PHE bringing together 70 different agencies, pursuing ground-breaking work on tackling obesity, promoting health improvement and leading PHE, in what has been an exceptionally challenging time. I am looking forward to continuing working with him as a leading figure in the global, public health agenda."

 

The NIHP will be a new organisation whose primary focus is to ensure we have the best capability to control infectious disease and deal with pandemics or health protection crises. It will take on existing UK-wide responsibilities and it will work with local government, the NHS and the devolved administrations to ensure we have the strongest possible health protection system for the whole of the UK. It will build on the existing strong working relationships between the 4 nations of the UK, including on data-sharing, alert levels and border issues.

 

It will report directly to the Health and Care Secretary and support the clinical leadership of the 4 UK chief medical officers.

 

The government is immediately bringing together PHE, NHS Test and Trace and the Joint Biosecurity Centre under the interim leadership of Baroness Dido Harding, with a single command structure and operating model to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

This builds on the joint work already being done by PHE and NHS Test and Trace, including the JBC, in response to COVID-19.

 

It will ensure the UK will be in an even stronger position to deal with and further recover from COVID-19, the strongest possible position to meet the health protection challenges over the coming winter and be more resilient to respond to future pandemics.

 

Baroness Dido Harding, Interim Executive Chair of the National Institute for Health Protection, said:

"Combining the UK’s world-class public health talent and infrastructure with the new at-scale response capability of NHS Test and Trace into a single organisation puts us in the strongest position to stop the spread of the virus."

"The fantastic teams in PHE, NHS Test and Trace and in local authorities have done so much over the past 8 months, and I thank them all for their service now and in the future."

"PHE has worked incredibly well with NHS Test and Trace, and with winter ahead, the life-saving work we are doing is more important than ever."

"The changes announced today are designed to strengthen our response, and to radically ramp up our fight against this disease, whilst also protecting PHE’s essential work beyond COVID that is so important for the nation’s health."

 

Supporting Baroness Harding in her role will be Michael Brodie, who has been appointed Interim Chief Executive Officer of PHE. Michael is currently CEO of the NHS Business Services Authority.

 

Duncan Selbie, the outgoing PHE Chief Executive, will be taking on a role as a senior advisor to the Department of Health and Social Care on global and public health.

 

The NIHP will seek to learn from the best systems around the world and work with local directors of public health and their teams, to use their crucial insight and intelligence to deliver a world-class service.

 

Preventing ill health and reducing health inequalities also remains a top priority. Over the coming weeks and months, the DHSC and PHE experts will engage on future options on decisions around the future of PHE’s remaining health improvement functions, including how to support a successful wider public health system to ensure we have the best possible capability and capacity to support people to improve their health.

 

The DHSC will establish a new Stakeholder Advisory Group to provide expert advice from leading thinkers in public health, health care and local government.

 

Duncan Selbie, outgoing PHE Chief Executive, said:

"I could not be any prouder of what PHE has achieved since 2013 in protecting the country from infectious diseases and environmental hazards and in improving the health of the people from reduced smoking rates to tackling poor air quality and obesity and much else."

"PHE’s work on the pandemic in the early stages and since stands testament to the professionalism and unremitting hard work of my colleagues and bought precious time for the NHS and government to prepare."

"It has been the honour and privilege of my career to lead PHE."

 

Published 18 August 2020

Link to source data

 

See also 

Speech

The future of public health

Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock spoke at Policy Exchange about the future of public health.

Published 18 August 2020

Link to source

 

And

Press release

Huge boost to national testing study will offer new COVID-19 insights

Infection survey to expand from testing 28,000 people per fortnight to 150,000 by October.

  • Office for National Statistics to significantly expand infection survey to 400,000 people in England, making it the country’s largest study tracking COVID-19 in the general population
  • New data will support rapid testing and diagnosis of COVID-19 on a national and local level, helping to narrow down the areas of concern
  • Government to provide £2 million grant to ZOE COVID-19 Symptom Study app to support its ongoing data collection

The ONS COVID-19 Infection Survey tracking the virus in the general population will expand from regularly testing 28,000 people per fortnight in England to 150,000 by October, the Health Secretary announces today. The survey aims to increase to 400,000 people across the entire project in England.

 

Published 19 August 2020

Link to source

 


Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

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Updates to the travel corridor list

 

Countries removed from the travel corridor list

 

The following countries were removed from the travel corridor list at 4am, Saturday 22 August 2020:

If you arrive in England from Austria, Croatia or Trinidad and Tobago after 4am 22 August, you will need to self-isolate.

 

The following countries and territories were removed from the travel corridor list at 4am, Saturday 15 August 2020:

  • Aruba
  • France
  • Malta
  • Monaco
  • the Netherlands
  • Turks and Caicos Islands

If you arrive in England from Aruba, France, Malta, Monaco, the Netherlands or Turks and Caicos Islands after 4am 15 August, you will need to self-isolate.

 

The following countries were removed from the travel corridor list at 4am, Saturday 8 August 2020:

  • Andorra
  • The Bahamas
  • Belgium

If you arrive in England from Andorra, The Bahamas or Belgium after 4am 8 August you will need to self-isolate.

 

 

Countries or territories added to the travel corridor list

 

Portugal was added to the travel corridor list at 4am, Saturday 22 August 2020.

If you arrive in England from Portugal after 4am 22 August you may not need to self-isolate. Read the rules about when you need to self-isolate and for how long.

If you arrived in England from Portugal before 4am 22 August, you will need to Self-isolate.

 

The following countries were added to the travel corridor list at 4am on Tuesday 11 August 2020:

  • Brunei
  • Malaysia

If you arrive in England from Brunei or Malaysia after 4am 11 August you may not need to self-isolate. Read the rules about when you need to self-isolate and for how long.

If you arrived in England from Brunei or Malaysia before 4am 11 August, you will need to self-isolate.

 

 

Countries and territories with no self-isolation requirement on arrival in England

 

You may not have to self-isolate if you are travelling from one of the countries or territories listed below.

You will need to self-isolate if you visited or made a transit stop in a country or territory that is not on the list in the 14 days before you arrive in England.

  • Akrotiri and Dhekelia
  • Anguilla
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Barbados
  • Bermuda
  • Bonaire, St Eustatius and Saba
  • British Antarctic Territory
  • British Indian Ocean Territory
  • British Virgin Islands
  • Brunei (added 11 August 2020 – if you arrived in England from Brunei before 11 August, you will need to self–isolate)
  • Cayman Islands
  • the Channel Islands
  • Curaçao
  • Cyprus
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Dominica
  • Estonia
  • Falkland Islands
  • Faroe Islands
  • Fiji
  • Finland
  • French Polynesia
  • Gibraltar
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Greenland
  • Grenada
  • Guadeloupe
  • Hong Kong
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • the Isle of Man
  • Italy
  • Jamaica
  • Japan
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Macao (Macau)
  • Malaysia (added 11 August 2020 – if you arrived in England from Malaysia before 11 August, you will need to self–isolate)
  • Mauritius
  • Montserrat
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • Norway
  • Pitcairn, Henderson, Ducie and Oeno Islands
  • Poland
  • Portugal (added 4am, Saturday 22 August 2020 – if you arrived in England from Portugal before 4am, 22 August, you will need to self–isolate)
  • Reunion
  • San Marino
  • Seychelles
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • South Korea
  • South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
  • St Barthélemy
  • St Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Pierre and Miquelon
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Switzerland
  • Taiwan
  • Turkey
  • Vatican City State
  • Vietnam

If you have coronavirus symptoms

Do not travel if you have coronavirus symptoms

Tell a member of the staff or crew if you develop symptoms while travelling

 

Published 22 August 2020

Link to source


Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
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Unity and division in Great Britain: 24 April to 28 June 2020

Has the COVID-19 pandemic situation changed people's perception?

 

The effect of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on perceptions of unity and division in Great Britain, using the weekly Opinions and Lifestyle Survey (OPN). Includes an assessment of unity and division over time and across numerous socioeconomic divides, such as age, sex and perceptions of community.

 

Main points

  • Over the period as a whole, from 24 April to 28 June 2020, more adults on average thought that Britain will be united after we have recovered from the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic (46%) than thought that we were united before the pandemic (24%).
  • In this same period, adults in Scotland were less likely (31%) to say that Britain will be united after the pandemic than those in either England (47%) or Wales (44%).
  • Although women were as likely as men to say that Britain was united before the pandemic, they were more likely than men to think that Britain will be united after it, with half (50%) saying that Britain would be either very or somewhat united compared with 41% of men.
  • Perceptions of unity within Britain are associated with higher average life satisfaction, happiness and feelings that things done in life are worthwhile as well as with checking on neighbours, feeling like the community is available to support you and thinking people are doing more to help others.
  • As time progressed through the period, the percentage of adults who thought that Britain would be more united after the pandemic declined by 29 percentage points (from 57% in the first week of the period to 28% in the last week) so that by the end of this period, there was no difference in the percentage of people who thought that Britain would be united before the pandemic compared with those who thought it would be united after.
  • Similarly, as time progressed through the period, there was only a small difference in the proportion of the population who thought that Britain would be equal after the pandemic (22%) compared with those who thought it was equal before (19%).
  • Although perceptions of how kind people in Britain will be after we recover from the coronavirus pandemic declined from 67% at the start of the period to 56% at the end of the period, by the end there were still more people who thought that people in Britain would be kind after the pandemic than thought that people were kind before it (46%).

See full results of the survey here

Published 25 August 2020

From: Office for National Statistics

 

 


Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
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Press release

New payment for people self-isolating in highest risk areas

 

People on low incomes who need to self-isolate and are unable to work from home in areas with high incidence of COVID-19 will benefit from a new payment scheme.

  • Government to implement new payment for people on low incomes in areas with high rates of COVID-19, who need to self-isolate and can’t work from home
  • Payments of up to £182 to be made to people who have tested positive for COVID-19 and their contacts
  • Scheme to start first in Blackburn with Darwen, Pendle, and Oldham

People on low incomes who need to self-isolate and are unable to work from home in areas with high incidence of COVID-19 will benefit from a new payment scheme starting on Tuesday 1 September, the Health Secretary has announced today.

 

Starting with a trial in Blackburn with Darwen, Pendle and Oldham to ensure the process works, eligible individuals who test positive with the virus will receive £130 for their 10-day period of self-isolation. Other members of their household, who have to self-isolate for 14 days, will be entitled to a payment of £182.

 

Non-household contacts advised to self-isolate through NHS Test and Trace will also be entitled to a payment of up to £182, tailored to the individual length of their isolation period.

 

It is designed to support people who are unable to work from home while self-isolating, either after testing positive, or after being identified by NHS Test and Trace as living in the same household as – or coming into contact with – someone who has tested positive. It will be available to people currently receiving either Universal Credit or Working Tax Credit.

 

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said:

"The British public have already sacrificed a great deal to help slow the spread of the virus. Self-isolating if you have tested positive for COVID-19, or have come into contact with someone who has, remains vital to keeping on top of local outbreaks."

 

"This new payment scheme will help people on low incomes and who are unable to work from home to continue playing their part in the national fight against this virus."

 

Payments will be provided within 48 hours of the eligible individual providing the necessary evidence. Individuals will be asked to provide a notification from NHS Test and Trace and a bank statement.

 

The local authority can also check the NHS Test and Trace system to confirm the individual has been asked to self-isolate, if the individual is unable to provide this information. The local authority will put in place checks to prevent fraud and ensure compliance through welfare check-ins, phone calls and employment checks.

 

There will be a rapid review of the scheme in Blackburn with Darwen, Pendle and Oldham to assess the performance consider how effectively vulnerable people have been reached, and consider how far it has helped reduce transmission of the virus in these areas. If the approach is successful, the scheme will be quickly applied in other areas of high COVID-19 incidence.

 

Background information

This will not reduce any other benefits that they receive. This payment equates to:-

  • £130 if an individual has tested positive for coronavirus and has to self-isolate for 10 days (from the point they first developed symptoms).
  • £182 if a member of an individual’s household has tested positive for coronavirus and they are asked to self-isolate for 14 days (from the point the member of their household first developed symptoms).
  • £13 per day (up to a maximum of £182) if an individual is identified as a non-household contact of another person who has tested positive for coronavirus and is asked to self-isolate up until 14 days after they were most recently in contact with the person who tested positive.

To be eligible for the funding, individuals must meet the following criteria:

  • Have tested positive for Covid-19 or received a notification from NHS Test and Trace asking them to self-isolate
  • Have agreed to comply with the notification from NHS Test and Trace and provided contact details to the local authority.
  • Be employed or self-employed. Employed people will be asked to show proof of employment. Self-employed will be required to show evidence of trading income and that their business delivers services which the local authority reasonably judges they are unable to carry out without social contact
  • Be unable to work from home (checks will be undertaken on all applicants) and will lose income a result
  • Be currently receiving Universal Credit or Working Tax Credit

 

Published 27 August 2020

From: Department of Health and Social Care

Link to source


Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
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Guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): travel corridors

List of countries and territories from where you can travel to England and may not have to self-isolate.

 

The following countries were removed from the exempt list at 4am, Saturday, 29 August 2020:

  • Czech Republic
  • Jamaica
  • Switzerland

If you arrive in England from the Czech Republic, Jamaica or Switzerland after 4am 29 August 2020, you will need to self-isolate.

 

The following countries were removed from the travel corridor list at 4am, Saturday 22 August 2020:

  • Austria
  • Croatia
  • Trinidad and Tobago

If you arrive in England from Austria, Croatia or Trinidad and Tobago after 4am 22 August, you will need to self-isolate.

 

The following country was added to the exempt list at 4am, Saturday, 29 August 2020:

  • Cuba

If you arrive in England from Cuba after 4am 29 August 2020 you may not need to self-isolate. Read the rules about when you need to self-isolate and for how long.

 

The following country was added to the exempt list at 4am, Saturday, 22 August 2020:

  • Portugal

If you arrive in England from Portugal after 4am 22 August you may not need to self-isolate. Read the rules about when you need to self-isolate and for how long.

 

Countries and territories with no self-isolation requirement on arrival in England:

You may not have to self-isolate if you are travelling from one of the countries or territories listed below.

You will need to self-isolate if you visited or made a transit stop in a country or territory that is not on the list in the 14 days before you arrive in England.

  • Akrotiri and Dhekelia
  • Anguilla
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Barbados
  • Bermuda
  • Bonaire, St Eustatius and Saba
  • British Antarctic Territory
  • British Indian Ocean Territory
  • British Virgin Islands
  • Brunei
  • Cayman Islands
  • the Channel Islands
  • Cuba (added 4am, 29 August 2020 – if you arrived in England from Cuba before 4am 29 August you will need to self-isolate)
  • Curaçao
  • Cyprus
  • Denmark
  • Dominica
  • Estonia
  • Falkland Islands
  • Faroe Islands
  • Fiji
  • Finland
  • French Polynesia
  • Gibraltar
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Greenland
  • Grenada
  • Guadeloupe
  • Hong Kong
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • the Isle of Man
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Macao (Macau)
  • Malaysia
  • Mauritius
  • Montserrat
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • Norway
  • Pitcairn, Henderson, Ducie and Oeno Islands
  • Poland
  • Portugal (added 4am, Saturday 22 August 2020 – if you arrived in England from Portugal before 4am, 22 August, you will need to self–isolate)
  • Reunion
  • San Marino
  • Seychelles
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • South Korea
  • South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
  • St Barthélemy
  • St Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Pierre and Miquelon
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Taiwan
  • Turkey
  • Vatican City State
  • Vietnam

Updated 29 August 2020 

Link to source data

__________________________________________________________

Last updated 3 September 2020 

News story

No changes to travel corridor list

 

  • no countries removed or added to the list of travel corridors for England today
  • all travellers urged to check the latest advice from the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) before travelling and will be required to fill in a passenger locator form before returning home
  • the government will not hesitate to remove countries from the travel corridors list rapidly if the public health risk becomes too high

Link to source data

__________________________________________________________

 

Press release

Restrictions lifted in parts of Greater Manchester, Lancashire and West Yorkshire

Locally led approach seeing results as COVID-19 cases drop in some hotspot areas in northern England.

  • Positive progress means 2 households can mix again in areas including Bolton, Stockport, Trafford, Hyndburn and Burnley
  • Some improvements in Leicester, with current restrictions remaining in place for a further 2 weeks as cases remain high

Following discussions with local leaders, the Health and Social Care Secretary, NHS Test and Trace, the Joint Biosecurity Centre (JBC), and the Chief Medical Officer for England have agreed this week’s changes to local restrictions in some parts of England.

From Wednesday 2 September restrictions on 2 households mixing introduced last month will be lifted in:

  • Bolton
  • Stockport
  • Trafford
  • Burnley
  • Hyndburn
  • parts of Bradford excluding Bradford city and Keighley town
  • parts of Calderdale excluding Halifax
  • parts of Kirklees excluding Dewsbury and Batley

Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said:

"We brought in measures to protect people in these parts of Northern England, and I want to thank residents who have worked so hard to get on top of this virus."

"We’re seeing the positive results of our local approach, and are able to bring in increasingly targeted measures."

"It is vital we can maintain this good progress. I have every faith people across the county, especially in areas where we are seeing higher numbers of cases, will continue to play their part by following local rules, and self-isolating and requesting a free test as soon as they get any symptoms."

 

 

The weekly Local Action Gold Committee, chaired by the Health and Social Care Secretary, agreed local restrictions will continue in the following areas.

 

Greater Manchester:

  • a ban on 2 households mixing indoors will continue in City of Manchester, Salford, Rochdale, Bury and Tameside
  • in Oldham, in addition to a household mixing ban indoors, residents will continue to be advised to avoid mixing with anyone from anther household anywhere. Cases per 100,000 in Oldham reached 67.1 during the week ending 20 August, the second highest in England

Lancashire:

  • in Pendle and Blackburn residents will continue to be advised to avoid mixing with anyone from another household anywhere. Some businesses and organisations remain closed in Blackburn and Darwen. Pendle had the highest number of cases per 100,000 anywhere in England during the week ending 20 August, reaching 67.8
  • the ban on 2 households mixing indoors will continue in Preston

Leicester:

  • on top of the indoor gatherings restrictions, some leisure sector businesses will continue to remain closed
  • the next review of these measures will take place by 11 September

West Yorkshire:

  • in urban areas of Bradford, the ban on indoor household gatherings remains in place and some businesses and organisations remain closed
  • in Kirklees, the ban on indoor household gatherings will continue in Dewsbury and Batley
  • the ban will also continue in parts of Calderdale

Shielding advice for clinical extremely vulnerable individuals remains in place across all of Blackburn with Darwen, and Leicester.

 

Background information

The full changes will be published on GOV.UK at Local restrictions: areas with an outbreak of coronavirus (COVID-19).

PHE’s weekly surveillance report includes changes to the watchlist of local authority areas with higher-than-average incidences of COVID-19.

 

The changes are:

  • Sandwell and Swindon move up the list and become ‘areas of enhanced support’
  • Luton becomes an ‘area of concern’ following a drop in cases
  • Trafford, Bolton, Stockport, Burnley, Hyndburn, Burnley, parts of Bradford, parts of Kirklees and parts of Calderdale are moved down the list, becoming areas of ‘enhanced support’
  • Stoke-on-Trent is being added to the list for the first time as an ‘area of concern’

This week’s PHE surveillance report also included data on rates of COVID-19 by ethnicity and age in each major region in England. This will allow the public and local leaders to more easily see how the pandemic is affecting different ethnic groups across the country, and to inform action to protect our most vulnerable communities

The 3 definitions for JBC and PHE’s watchlist are ‘areas of concern’, ‘areas of enhanced support’ and ‘areas of intervention’:

  • for ‘areas of concern’, upper tier local authorities will work with partners, supported by regional PHE and NHS Test and Trace resource, to take additional actions to manage outbreaks and reduce community spread of the virus to more normal levels. Actions taken may include additional targeted testing at high-risk areas or groups, for example care homes, enhanced communications around the importance of social distancing, hand hygiene and other preventative measures, and more detailed epidemiological work to understand where clusters of the virus are occurring so that appropriate action can be taken
  • areas deemed for ‘enhanced support’ will be provided with increased national support, capacity and oversight, including additional resources deployed to augment the local teams where this is necessary. Actions taken may include significant additional widespread testing deployed to the upper tier local authorities, national support for local recommendations put in place to manage outbreaks, and detailed engagement with high-risk groups and sectors to help increase the effectiveness of testing and tracing in these areas
  • ‘areas of intervention’ are defined where there is divergence from the lockdown measures in place in the rest of England because of the significance of the spread of COVID-19. There are a range of non-pharmaceutical interventions available to local and national leaders, from extensive communications and expanded testing, to restrictions on businesses and gatherings

Area-specific changes

 

Areas in Bradford where restrictions are being lifted:

  • Worth Valley
  • Craven
  • Ilkley
  • Baildon
  • Bingley
  • Bingley Rural
  • Shipley
  • Wharfedale
  • Windhill and Wrose

Areas in Calderdale where restrictions are being lifted:

  • Brighouse
  • Calder
  • Elland
  • Greenland and Stainland
  • Hipperholme and Lightcliffe
  • Luddendenfoot
  • Rastrick
  • Ryburn
  • Todmorden

Areas in Kirklees where restrictions are being lifted:

  • Golcar
  • Greenhead
  • Heckmondwike
  • Holme Valley South
  • Lindley
  • Liversedge and Gomersal
  • Mirfield
  • Newsome
  • Cleckheaton
  • Dalton
  • Denby Dale
  • Almondbury
  • Colne Valley
  • Crosland Moor and Netherton
  • Holme Valley North
  • Kirkburton
  • Ashbrow
  • Birstall and Birkenshaw

 

Published 28 August 2020
Link to source

__________________________________________________________

 

Guidance

The R number and growth rate in the UK

The latest reproduction number (R) and growth rate of coronavirus (COVID-19) in the UK.

 

Latest R number range for the UK

0.9-1.1

Latest growth rate range for the UK

-2% to +1%

 

Latest for devolved administrations

The latest ranges for values in the devolved administrations are published on their respective websites:

 

Last updated 28 August 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

 

Contracts that cannot go ahead due to lockdown laws

In some circumstances, due to lockdown laws, a contract cannot go ahead as agreed or at all, and is therefore ‘frustrated’. A contract will be frustrated as a matter of law if, due to no fault of the parties, something happens after the contract was entered into which means it can no longer be performed at all or performance would be radically different to what was agreed.

 

As a result, the contract comes to an end and, where consumers have paid money in advance for services or goods that they have yet to receive, they will generally be entitled to obtain a refund.

They will also not be required to make further payments.

 

In particular, for most consumer contracts, the CMA would expect a consumer to be offered a full refund where:

  • a business has cancelled a contract without providing any of the promised goods or services
  • no goods or services are provided by a business because this is prevented by the lockdown laws
  • a consumer is prevented from receiving any goods or services, because, for example, lockdown laws in the UK or abroad have made it illegal to receive or use the goods or services

In most cases, consumers will contact a business to ask for their money back, but there is no requirement for consumers formally to communicate with a business before becoming entitled to a refund.

 

Examples of legal restrictions in lockdown laws include:

  • restrictions imposed under the original lockdown laws in the early stages of the pandemic
  • restrictions imposed by local lockdown laws
  • specific restrictions imposed by local authorities under their legal lockdown powers
  • mandatory self-isolation following a direction from a public health officer
  • mandatory self-isolation when returning to the UK from certain countries which may affect the consumer’s ability to use a service during the self-isolation period (provided that the requirement to self-isolate was imposed after the consumer had entered into the relevant contract and was not reasonably anticipated by the consumer)

 

If laws in another country prevent a business from providing a service under a contract with a UK consumer or prevent that consumer from receiving the service, then in most cases consumers will also be entitled to a refund.

 

Businesses should not require consumers to take unreasonable or unnecessary steps in order to obtain refunds. A business imposing such barriers may breach consumer protection law by doing so.

 

Non-refundable payments and fees:

In the CMA’s view, for consumer contracts the above rights to a refund will usually apply even where the business says part of the payment is a non-refundable deposit or advance payment.

 

This is because the contract will have been frustrated and terms which allow a business to provide no service but keep a consumer’s money (including deposits or advance payments) are likely to be unfair, and therefore unenforceable under Part 2 of the Consumer Rights Act 2015.

 

Last updated 28 August 2020

Link to source

 


Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

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The R number and growth rate in the UK

 

Latest by NHS England regions

image.png

 

Latest for devolved administrations

The latest ranges for values in the devolved administrations are published on their respective websites:

Northern Ireland R number

Scotland R number

Wales R number  (Cymraeg)

 

Published 15 May 2020
Last updated 4 September 2020

Link to source data

__________________________________________________________

Press release

Government delivers 250,000 clear face masks to support people with hearing loss

250,000 clear face masks are to be delivered to frontline NHS and social care workers to support better care for people who use lip-reading and facial expressions to communicate.

 

NHS and care workers will be given clear face masks to help them communicate with people with certain conditions like hearing loss, autism and dementia, the government has announced.

 

The masks are see-through and have an anti-fogging barrier to ensure the face and mouth are always visible to help doctors, nurses and carers communicate better with their patients.

 

With around 12 million people in the UK thought to have hearing loss, the masks will be invaluable for people who need to lip-read to communicate during the ongoing response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and beyond.

The masks will also help those who rely on facial expressions to support communication. For example, people with learning disabilities, autism or dementia, or foreign language speakers and their interpreters.

 

The new deal with US-based company ClearMask will see 250,000 masks delivered to NHS trusts and social care providers across the UK over the next few weeks.

 

https://www.theclearmask.com

 

Published 5 September 2020

Link to source data

 


Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

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Countries and territories with no self-isolation requirement on arrival in England

updated 7 September 2020

 

You may not have to self-isolate if you are travelling from one of the countries or territories listed below. You will still need to complete the passenger locator form before you enter the UK.

 

You will need to self-isolate if you visited or made a transit stop in a country or territory that is not on the list in the 14 days before you arrive in England.

  • Akrotiri and Dhekelia
  • Anguilla
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Barbados
  • Bermuda
  • Bonaire, St Eustatius and Saba
  • British Antarctic Territory
  • British Indian Ocean Territory
  • British Virgin Islands
  • Brunei
  • Cayman Islands
  • the Channel Islands
  • Cuba
  • Curaçao
  • Cyprus
  • Denmark
  • Dominica
  • Estonia
  • Falkland Islands
  • Faroe Islands
  • Fiji
  • Finland
  • French Polynesia
  • Gibraltar
  • Germany
  • Greece (the Greek islands Crete, Lesvos, Mykonos, Santorini, Serifos, Tinos and Zakynthos will be removed from this list 4am Wednesday 9 September 2020)
  • Greenland
  • Grenada
  • Guadeloupe
  • Hong Kong
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • the Isle of Man
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Macao (Macau)
  • Malaysia
  • Mauritius
  • Montserrat
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • Norway
  • Pitcairn, Henderson, Ducie and Oeno Islands
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Reunion
  • San Marino
  • Seychelles
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • South Korea
  • South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
  • St Barthélemy
  • St Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Pierre and Miquelon
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Taiwan
  • Turkey
  • Vatican City State
  • Vietnam

 

Countries, territories or regions removed from the travel corridor list

 

  • Czech Republic
  • Jamaica
  • Switzerland
  • Crete
  • Lesvos
  • Mykonos
  • Santorini
  • Serifos
  • Tinos
  • Zakynthos

Countries or territories added to the travel corridor list

  • Cuba

 

Last updated 7 September 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

Oral statement to Parliament on international travel corridors

Published 7 September 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

Guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): travel corridors

Last updated 11 September 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

Guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): travel corridors

Last updated 17 September 2020

Link to source

__________________________________________________________

 


Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
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News story

Coronavirus (COVID-19): What has changed – 9 September

The government has announced new measures to suppress the virus and keep the number of infections down.

 

The government has a plan to control the virus and protect the public, as well as keeping the economy and society open. That plan is working: with great collective effort, we have reduced infections significantly from its peak, and enabled the return of more normality to our lives. This is not the time for complacency; we have seen big increases in the spread of the virus in Europe and other countries. With cases increasing in the UK, we all – businesses, individuals, and government – need to take action to suppress the virus.

 

It is critical that everybody observes the following key behaviours:

  • HANDS – Wash your hands regularly and for 20 seconds.
  • FACE – Wear a face covering in indoor settings where social distancing may be difficult and where you will come into contact with people you do not normally meet.
  • SPACE – Stay 2 metres apart from people you do not live with where possible, or 1 metre with extra precautions in place.

The government has announced new measures to suppress the virus and keep the number of infections down:

  • From Monday 14 September, you must not meet with people from other households socially in groups of more than 6. This will apply indoors and outdoors, including in private homes. This change will simplify and clarify the rules on social gatherings, so they are easier to understand and easier for the police to enforce. There will be a limited number of exemptions. COVID-19 Secure venues, such as places of worship, restaurants and hospitality venues, can still host larger numbers in total but groups of up to 6 must not mix or form larger groups. This rule will not apply to individual households or support bubbles of more than 6 who will still be able to gather together. Education and work settings are unaffected, and organised team sports will still be able to proceed, as will weddings and funerals up to 30. From Monday, this limit will be enforceable in law.
  • Businesses will have a clear duty to support NHS Test and Trace. From 18 September, it will be mandatory for certain businesses to have a system to collect NHS Test and Trace data, and keep this for 21 days. Core COVID-19 Secure requirements will be mandated for hospitality businesses, and egregious breaches enforced. The government has also published simplified COVID-19 Secure guidance, available here.
  • The government will support Local Authorities and police forces to respond to breaches of COVID-19 Secure guidelines. We will launch a register of newly qualified and recently retired Environmental Health Officers (EHOs) so that Local Authorities can recruit more quickly and fill any gaps. In addition, we will introduce COVID-19 Secure Marshals to help local authorities support social distancing in towns and city centres.
  • The government will take steps to improve compliance with border requirements. We will simplify the Passenger Locator Form needed for travelling to the UK, and take measures to ensure passengers have filled out their form before departure. Border Force will step up and target their enforcement efforts at the border to ensure arrivals are complying with the rules.
  • The government will review plans to pilot larger audiences in venues this month. Planned sports pilot events will be limited to smaller, safer numbers, with strict conditions to ensure social distancing, and will not take place in areas where incidence is high. We will review our intention to return audiences to stadia and conference centres from 1 October.
  • The government will restrict the opening hours of premises, initially in local lockdown areas, with the option of national action in the future. This has been introduced in Bolton, following a steep rise in cases, and will seek to restrict activities that may lead to a spread in the virus.

These measures apply to England – but there may be different rules if you live in an area under local lockdown and you should check those rules here. If you are in WalesScotland and Northern Ireland, different rules may apply.

 

Published 9 September 2020 

From: Cabinet Office

Link to source data

__________________________________________________________

Press release

New campaign to prevent spread of coronavirus indoors this winter

 

The ‘Hands. Face. Space’ public information campaign urges the public to continue to wash their hands, cover their face and make space to control infection rates and avoid a second peak.

 

  • The spread of coronavirus, particularly in enclosed spaces is shown in a new film, produced with experts in the field, which highlights the risk in simple, everyday interactions
  • The campaign will run across TV, radio, print, out of home, social and digital display advertising

A new science based public information campaign will be launched ahead of winter to highlight how everyone can help to stop the spread of the virus by remembering to wash their hands, cover their face and make space.

 

‘Hands. Face. Space’ will run across TV, radio, print, out of home, social and digital display advertising, as well as on community media channels and will be supported by a variety of public and private sector partners throughout the coming weeks.

 

As part of this campaign, a new video is being released to show exactly how coronavirus spreads indoors. With people expected to spend more time inside during the winter, the film – produced with the help of scientific experts – encourages the public to follow simple steps to reduce the risk of infection.

 

Through a scientifically based reconstruction of everyday scenarios the film shows how the interactions between people, surfaces and the air spread the virus. The film also reflects how coronavirus spreads through droplets that come out of our nose and mouth. This is a powerful reminder to the public of the importance of remaining aware of their surroundings and following the guidance.

 

Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty said:

"As we approach winter and inevitably spend more time indoors, we need the public to keep following this important advice to control the spread of the virus."

"Hands. Face. Space’ emphasises important elements of the guidance we want everybody to remember: wash your hands regularly, use a face covering when social distancing is not possible and try to keep your distance from those not in your household."

"Following these simple steps could make a significant difference in reducing the transmission of COVID-19 and help protect you and your friends, colleagues and family from the virus."

 

The compelling evidence combined with expert recommendations around ‘Hands. Face. Space’ includes:

 

Washing your hands

While coronavirus is not likely to survive for long periods of time on outdoor surfaces in sunlight, it can live for more than 24 hours in indoor environments (see endnote 1). Washing your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, or using hand sanitizer, regularly throughout the day will reduce the risk of catching or passing on the virus (see endnote 2).

 

Covering your face

Coronavirus is carried in the air by tiny respiratory droplets that carry the virus. Larger droplets can land on other people or on surfaces they touch while smaller droplets, called aerosols, can stay in the air indoors for at least 5 minutes, and often much longer if there is no ventilation (see endnote 3). Face coverings reduce the dispersion of these droplets, meaning if you’re carrying the virus you’re less likely to spread it when you exhale (see endnote 4).

 

Making space

Transmission of the virus is most likely to happen within 2 metres, with risk increasing exponentially at shorter distances (see endnote 5). While keeping this exact distance isn’t always possible, remaining mindful of surroundings and continuing to make space has a powerful impact when it comes to containing the spread.

 

While coronavirus deaths have significantly reduced, the virus is still circulating in communities and impacting people of all ages across the UK. ‘Hands. Face. Space’ are simple but vital behaviours that have the power to protect the public from both the short and potential long-term impact of coronavirus.

 

Professor Catherine Noakes, part of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) who specialises in airborne infections said:

"Coronavirus is emitted in tiny droplets when we breathe, talk, laugh or cough. Other people can be exposed to these when they are close to someone with the virus or they are in a poorly ventilated room for a long time."

"Wearing a face covering prevents most of these droplets from being released into the air, and can also reduce the number of droplets that you are exposed to. That is why wearing a face covering serves as a vital first line of defence against catching and spreading the virus, along with regular and thorough handwashing with soap and water and maintaining a safe distance wherever possible."

 

Poppy, 27 from London and suffering from long-term COVID-19 symptoms:

"There is a worrying trend at the moment for people who don’t consider themselves as being at a high-risk group to be dismissive of how the virus may impact them. Before having coronavirus, I was fit and healthy. Now 6 months after supposedly recovering, I’m still dealing with the aftermath of the virus which affects my everyday life. You really don’t know how this will impact you and just because you’re not classed as vulnerable – doesn’t mean you’re not at risk."

 

The public are encouraged to continue to be vigilant of coronavirus symptoms which include a new continuous cough, high temperature, or a loss or change in your sense of taste or smell. If you or someone you know, displays any symptoms, no matter how mild, please get a free test by calling 119 or visiting NHS.uk

 

Background information

 

 

Additional information about the Test and Trace approach

The new NHS Test and Trace service helps identify, contain and control coronavirus, reduce the spread of the virus and save lives. We all have a vital role to play in tackling coronavirus and NHS Test and Trace will help us return life to as close to normal as possible in a way that is safe and avoids a second peak.

 

If you have coronavirus symptoms you must self-isolate immediately with other members of your household and book a test on the website: nhs.uk/coronavirus or via 119.

 

Those who have tested positive for coronavirus will be contacted by the service by text, email or phone – and asked to share information about their recent close contacts. Close contacts could include household members, people with whom they have been in direct contact, or within 2 metres for more than 15 minutes.

 

Endnotes (links within the text above)

 

Endnote 1: van Doremalen N, Bushmaker T, Morris DH, et al. Aerosol and Surface Stability of SARS-CoV2 as Compared with SARS-CoV-1. N Engl J Med 2020; 382(16): 1564-7

 

Endnote 2: Beale S, Johnson A, Zambon M, null n, Hayward A, Fragaszy E. Hand Hygiene Practices and the Risk of Human Coronavirus Infections in a UK Community Cohort [version 1; peer review: 1 approved]. Wellcome Open Research 2020; 5(98).

 

Endnote 3: A. C. Fears et al., “Persistence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 in Aerosol Suspensions,” Emerg. Infect. Dis., vol. 26, no. 9, Sep. 2020, doi: 10.3201/eid2609.201806.

 

Endnote 4: D. K. Milton, M. P. Fabian, B. J. Cowling, M. L. Grantham, and J. J. McDevitt, “Influenza Virus Aerosols in Human Exhaled Breath: Particle Size, Culturability, and Effect of Surgical Masks,” PLoS Pathog., vol. 9, no. 3, 2013, doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1003205.

 

Endnote 5: W. Chen, N. Zhang, J. Wei, H. Yen, and Y. Li, “Short-range airborne route dominates exposure of respiratory infection during close contact,” Build. Environ., pp. 1–33, 2020, doi: 10.1016/j.buildenv.2020.106859

 

Published 9 September 2020

Link to source data

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Guidance

Stay alert and safe: social distancing guidance for young people

 

The most important thing we can do is to stay alert, control the virus, and in doing so, save lives.

 

Details

This guidance applies in England – young people in ScotlandWales and Northern Ireland should follow the specific rules in those parts of the UK.

 

COVID-19 is a new type of coronavirus that causes illness in people by affecting their lungs and therefore their breathing. The virus can be spread from person to person by coughing or touching your eyes, nose or mouth with hands that have been contaminated by the virus. The name COVID-19 comes from Coronavirus Disease 2019 – it was named in December 2019. This guidance will refer to this as coronavirus (COVID-19).

 

All of us, including young people, have helped to reduce the spread of coronavirus. We have done this by making changes to our lives and following the guidance. As we move to the next stage of controlling coronavirus, it is important that we stay alert and follow the guidance in order to save lives. By “alert” we mean being aware of how to behave safely and keeping up to date with the latest government guidance.

 

The government has developed a plan to allow people to gradually go back to the way they were living before coronavirus. This will not be happening immediately, and may happen in different stages for different people. Our goal is to “stay alert, control the virus, save lives’.

 

To stop coronavirus (COVID-19) spreading, everyone should be staying at home as much as possible. Some young people, who are clinically extremely vulnerable, should stay at home all the time. This is called ‘shielding’. Guidance on ‘shielding’ for these clinically extremely vulnerable young people is available here.

 

This guidance is about social distancing and what you can do to stay alert and safe during this time, and explains the new measures that will help you to stay safe as rules on being outside, or at school or work, change.

 

Published 24 May 2020
Last updated 9 September 2020

Link to source data

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Speech

PM press conference statement: 9 September 2020

Prime Minister Boris Johnson made a statement at the coronavirus press conference.

 

Good afternoon,

 

Welcome back to Downing Street for an update on coronavirus as we enter autumn and approach winter.

I will first hand over to Chris to take us through the latest data before I set out how we are responding to it.

Thank you Chris. It is clear from that very powerful graphic that we must act.

 

The most important thing every one of us must do is remember the basics.

 

First, wash your hands, regularly and for 20 seconds. Don’t get back into old habits, it is so vital.

 

Second, wear a face covering over your mouth and nose if you are in an enclosed space and in close contact with people you don’t normally meet. I know wearing a face covering feels odd to some people and I understand that. But face coverings do make it harder for the virus to spread – so please, wear one to protect others.

 

Third, make space. Always stay 2 metres away from people you don’t live with – or 1 metre with extra precautions, like extra ventilation, screens, or face coverings.

 

Fourth, if you have COVID symptoms, get a test and self-isolate. We are now processing 1.2 million tests a week. To date we have carried out 15.4 million antigen tests – that’s more than any other country in Europe, and more per head than other European countries like Germany and Spain.

 

We are increasing our testing capacity further to meet rising demand. You can help by only booking a test if you have a fever, a new continuous cough, or you’ve lost your sense of taste or smell – if you don’t have those symptoms and haven’t been asked to book a test, please don’t.

 

So those are the basics – hands, face, space – and get a test if you have COVID symptoms.

 

Since the pandemic began, we have asked you to reduce your social contact and limit your interactions with friends and family.

 

I know that, over time, the rules have become quite complicated and confusing. We have spoken to police officers about what they need for an effective enforcement regime and of course, listened to the feedback from you, the public.

 

In response, we are simplifying and strengthening the rules – making them easier for you to understand and for the police to enforce.

 

I should stress that if we are to beat the virus then everyone, at all times, should limit social contact as much as possible and minimise interactions with other households. It is safer to meet outdoors and you should keep your distance from anyone you don’t live with, even if they are close friends or family.

 

So in England, from Monday, we are introducing the rule of 6. You must not meet socially in groups of more than 6 – and if you do, you will be breaking the law.

 

This will apply in any setting, indoors or outdoors, at home or in the pub.

 

The ban will be set out in law and it will be enforced by the police – anyone breaking the rules risks being dispersed, fined and possibly arrested.

 

Existing ban on gatherings of more than 30 and the current guidance on allowing 2 households to meet indoors. Now you only need to remember the rule of 6.

 

There will be some limited exemptions. For example, if a single household or support bubble is larger than 6, they can still gather.

 

COVID Secure venues like places of worship, gyms, restaurants and hospitality venues can still hold more than 6 people in total. Within those venues however, there must not be individual groups larger than 6, and groups must not mix socially or form larger groups.

 

Education and work settings are unaffected, COVID Secure weddings and funerals can go ahead, up to a limit of 30 people, and organised sport will still be able to proceed.

 

As we have found on previous occasions, this rule of 6 will of course throw up difficult cases. For example, two whole households will no longer be able to meet if they would together exceed the limit of 6 people.

 

I am sorry about that and I wish that we did not have to take this step. But, as your Prime Minister, I must do what is necessary to stop the spread of the virus and to save lives.

 

We will of course keep the rule of 6 under constant review and only keep it in place as long as it’s necessary.

 

I also want to see – and the public wants to see – stronger enforcement of the rules which are already in place. So I’ve have tasked the Cabinet with increasing enforcement and I would like to thank the police, as always, and other authorities for the work they are doing to keep us all safe.

 

In future:

  • Premises and venues where people meet socially will be legally required to request the contact details of a member of every party, record and retain these details for 21 days, and provide them to NHS Test & Trace without delay when required.
  • We will support local authorities to make further and faster use of their powers to close venues that are breaking the rules and pose a risk to public health.
  • Fines will be levied against hospitality venues that fail to ensure their premises remain COVID Secure.
  • We will boost the enforcement capacity of local authorities by introducing COVID Secure Marshalls to help ensure social distancing in town and city centres, and by setting up a register of Environmental Health Officers that local authorities can draw upon for support.
  • We will simplify the Passenger Locator Form needed for travelling to the UK, and take measures to ensure these are completed and checked before departure.
  • Border Force will step up enforcement efforts at the border to ensure arrivals are complying with the quarantine rules.
  • We will also restrict the opening hours of premises, initially in some local areas.

 

At the present time we must also, I’m afraid, revise plans to pilot larger audiences in venues later this month and review our intention to return audiences to stadiums and conference centres from 1 October. That doesn’t mean we’re going to scrap the programme entirely it just means we are going to review and abridge it, and the Culture Secretary will say more shortly.

 

Let me be clear – these measures are not a second national lockdown – the whole point of them is to avoid a second national lockdown.

 

By bearing down on social contact and improving enforcement, we can keep schools and businesses open, in the knowledge they are COVID Secure.

 

I have always said schools and colleges should only ever be shut again as a very, very last resort. As the Chief Medical Officer and Chief Scientific Adviser have said, the long term risks to children’s life chances of not going to school are significant and far greater than the health risks of going back to school.

 

Indeed it’s been fantastic to see so many children back in school this term and I want, once again, to thank all our teachers, and to reassure parents and pupils that schools are safe.

 

University terms will also begin soon. Opening universities is critical, again, for students’ life chances and, again, the health risks to individuals are low.

 

Of course, many university students are in the age bracket where we have seen the infection rates rise recently as Chris was just explaining. My message to students is simple. Please, for the sake of your education and your parents’ and your grandparents’ health: wash your hands, cover your face, make space, and don’t socially gather in groups of more than 6, now and when term starts.

 

Today the Department for Education is publishing updated guidance for universities on how they can operate in a COVID Secure way, including a clear request not to send students home in the event of an outbreak, so as to avoid spreading the virus across the country. I am very grateful to universities for their continued cooperation and planning for the return of students.

 

The measures I have set out today will help us control the virus but won’t, on their own, be enough to allow a more significant return to normality.

 

Patrick is going to set out in a moment where we are on vaccines and treatments in a moment, but we are not there yet and there are no guarantees.

 

So over the summer, we have therefore been working up an alternative plan which could allow life to return closer to normality. And that plan is based on mass testing.

 

Up to now, we have used testing primarily to identify people who are positive – so we can isolate them from the community and protect high risk groups. And that will continue to be our priority. We are working hard to increase our testing capacity to 500,000 tests a day by the end of October.

 

But in future, in the near future, we want to start using testing to identify people who are negative – who don’t have coronavirus and who are not infectious - so we can allow them to behave in a more normal way, in the knowledge they cannot infect anyone else with the virus.

 

And we think, we hope, we believe that new types of test which are simple, quick and scalable will become available. They use swabs or saliva and can turn round results in 90 or even 20 minutes. Crucially, it should be possible to deploy these tests on a far bigger scale than any country has yet achieved – literally millions of tests processed every single day.

 

That level of testing would allow people to lead more normal lives, without the need for social distancing:

Theatres and sports venues could test all audience members on the day and let in those with a negative result, all those who are not infectious. Workplaces could be opened up to all those who test negative that morning and allow them to behave in a way that was normal before COVID. Those isolating because they are a contact, or quarantining after travelling abroad, could after a period be tested and released. Now that is an ambitious agenda, but we are going to pilot this approach in Salford from next month, with audiences in indoor and outdoor venues. And then we hope to go nationwide.

 

There are a number of challenges. We need the technology to work. We need to source the necessary materials to manufacture so many tests. We need to put in place an efficient distribution network. And we need to work through the numerous logistical challenges.

 

And as I say, we are not there yet, and I should repeat that, as we manage this period of high demand, it is especially important that if individuals don’t have symptoms, and have not been specifically advised to take a test, they should not be coming forward for a test - because they could be taking a test away from someone who really needs it.

Our plan – this moonshot that I am describing – will require a giant, collaborative effort from government, business, public health professionals, scientists, logistics experts and many, many more.

 

Work is underway – and we will get on at pace until we get there, round the clock.

 

We are hopeful this approach will be widespread by the spring and, if everything comes together, it may be possible even for challenging sectors like theatres to have life much closer to normal before Christmas.

 

But as I have said before, all this progress is contingent on continued scientific advances and though we’re hopeful, I cannot 100% guarantee that those advances will be made.

 

That is why it is so important that we take these tough measures now.

 

I believe we will continue to drive this virus down and that we will beat this virus before too long.

 

So let’s work together and follow the rules: meet in groups of no more than six. Wash your hands, cover your face, and make space.

 

I will now hand over to Patrick to set out the latest on vaccines and treatments, and then we’ll go to questions from the public and the media.

 

Published 9 September 2020

From: Prime Minister's Office, 10 Downing Street and The Rt Hon Boris Johnson MP

Delivered on: 9 September 2020 (Transcript of the speech, exactly as it was delivered)

Link to source data

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Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

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Latest R number and growth rate

Last updated on Friday 11 September 2020.
 

Latest R number range for the UK

1.0-1.2

Latest growth rate range for the UK

-1% to +3%per day

 

An R number between 1.0 and 1.2 means that on average every 10 people infected will infect between 10 and 12 other people. The UK estimates of R and growth rate are averages over very different epidemiological situations and should be regarded as a guide to the general trend rather than a description of the epidemic state.

 

image.png

When the numbers of cases or deaths fall to low levels and/or there is a high degree of variability in transmission across a region, then care should be taken when interpreting estimates of R and the growth rate. For example, a significant amount of variability across a region due to a local outbreak may mean that a single average value does not accurately reflect the way infections are changing throughout that region.

 

It is SAGE’s expert view, however, that this week’s estimates are reliable, and that the epidemic is growing.

These estimates represent the transmission of COVID-19 over the past few weeks due to the time delay between someone being infected, having symptoms and needing healthcare.

 

Estimates for R and growth rates are shown as a range, and the true values are likely to lie within this range.

 

Latest for devolved administrations:

The latest ranges for values in the devolved administrations are published on their respective websites:

Northern Ireland R number

Scotland R number

Wales R number (Cymraeg)

 

 

Published 15 May 2020
Last updated 11 September 2020

Link to source data


Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

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If you have had to self isolate for 14 days and you do not have any coronavirus symptoms after 14 days, you can stop self-isolating. The rules vary in different parts of the UK so you will then need to follow the same rules for the part of the UK you’re staying in. See the links below:

England

Scotland

Wales

Northern Ireland

 

Published 3 June 2020
Last updated 15 September 2020

Link to source data

__________________________________________________________

 


Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

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Guidance

Coronavirus (COVID-19): getting tested

 

Contents:

  • Who can be tested
  • The testing process
  • Care homes

List of essential workers and those prioritised for testing (England only)

You can get a swab test to check if you currently have coronavirus. This is part of the 5-pillar strategy for coronavirus testing. Testing is most effective within 3 days of symptoms developing.

 

Who can be tested

 

Anyone with symptoms can get a coronavirus test, whatever their age.

Once you’ve received a coronavirus home test kit, you must register it so that we can send your results to you.

See the guidance below on testing for care home residents and workers.

 

Employer referral for essential workers

 

Employers can refer essential workers for testing if they are self-isolating because either they or member(s) of their household have coronavirus symptoms.

 

They can do this by uploading the names and contact details of self-isolating essential workers to the secure employer referral portal.

 

Referred essential workers will then receive a text message with a unique invitation code to book a test for themselves (if symptomatic) or their symptomatic household member(s) at a regional testing site.

 

To get a login to the employer referral portal, employers of essential workers should email portalservicedesk@dhsc.gov.uk with the following information:

  • organisation name
  • nature of the organisation’s business
  • region
  • names (where possible) and email addresses of the 2 users who will load essential worker contact details

Once employer details have been verified, 2 login credentials will be provided for the employer referral portal.

See the list of essential workers below.

 

The testing process

 

The test involves taking a swab of the nose and the back of the throat, which can be done by the person themselves (self-administered) or by someone else (assisted).

 

The different ways you can get tested are covered below.

 

Test sites

 

We’re establishing a network of drive-through and walk-through test sites.

 

Watch a video explaining the process for drive-through testing:

 

Coronavirus tests for essential workers

 

Home testing

 

Home test kits can be delivered to someone’s door so they can test themselves and their family without leaving the house. Home test kit availability will be initially limited, but more will become available.

 

If you have been delivered a home testing kit or have been given a self-test kit at a regional test site, here is a tutorial video that supports the written instructions in your pack, from Dr Amir Khan:

 

How to take a coronavirus self-test swab

 

You can also read:

Mobile testing units

 

Mobile testing units travel around the UK to increase access to coronavirus testing. They respond to need, travelling to test essential workers at sites including care homes, police stations and prisons.

 

New units are being brought into operation each day.

 

Satellite centres

 

NHS capability is being increased by providing test kits directly to ‘satellite’ centres at places like hospitals that have a particularly urgent or significant need.

 

NHS facilities

 

Testing within an NHS facility such as a hospital is available for patients and some NHS workers.

 

Across all these testing methods, there is a network of couriers who collect the completed samples and deliver them safely to one of our laboratories. The swab samples are analysed at our labs and the result is communicated back to the individual.

 

We aim to return test results within 48 hours of a swab being taken, or within 72 hours for a home test.

 

Care homes

 

England

In England, all registered adult care homes can apply for coronavirus tests.

 

You should contact your local Health Protection Team (HPT) if:

  • you suspect your care home has a new coronavirus outbreak (one or more suspected or confirmed cases of COVID-19)
  • it has been 28 days or longer since your last case and you have new cases

Your HPT will provide advice and arrange the first tests. See a graphic summarising testing for care homes (PDF, 60.2KB, 2 pages).

 

For testing in other situations, you should apply for testing kits following the instructions below.

 

Scotland

 

In a care home where there is one or more confirmed case of coronavirus, the local health board must offer testing to all staff and residents regardless of symptoms as part of enhanced outbreak investigations. Testing will be organised by local health board testing teams, using local and NHS Scotland laboratory capacity.

 

In a care home with no positive cases for 2 weeks or more, the local health board must offer testing to all staff on a weekly basis. Please follow the instructions below to access this routine testing of staff in your care home.

 

Wales

Existing arrangements include testing:

 

  • all residents and staff of care homes with ongoing cases of COVID-19 and any home reporting a new outbreak
  • larger care homes registered for 50 or more beds
  • all people being discharged from hospital to live in care homes regardless of whether or not they were admitted to hospital with COVID-19
  • all people who are being transferred between care homes and for new admissions from the community

This policy has been supplemented by a large-scale testing programme covering all residents and staff across care homes in Wales that have not reported an outbreak or any cases of coronavirus in the last 28 days. It’s being followed up through a weekly rolling programme to test care home staff.

 

Wales’ policy for testing in care homes will continue to be reviewed and adapted as the scientific evidence changes

 

How to test care home residents and workers

 

You can apply for coronavirus testing kits to test the residents and/or staff of your care home. You can apply whether or not any of your residents or staff have coronavirus symptoms.

Regular testing in care homes (England)

 

On 6 July, we started rolling out regular testing (retesting) for care homes in England. Retesting involves care homes testing staff weekly and residents every 28 days.

 

Applications for retesting are now open for care homes caring for the over-65s and those with dementia. The remaining adult care homes will be able to register for retesting from 31 August.

 

Any specialist care homes that have not yet registered for their initial whole care home tests should still apply on the care home portal to receive their initial whole care home tests.

 

Care homes will need to re-register on the care home portal to apply for retesting. Applications for retesting are now open for care homes caring for the over-65s and those with dementia.

 

See a graphic summarising testing for care homes (PDF, 60.2KB, 2 pages).

 

Workers with symptoms

 

Care home workers with symptoms should be self-isolating and can access testing through the self-referral or employer referral portals, above.

 

Information about testing kits

 

There are 2 types of test kits delivered to care homes:

  • Randox test kits
  • all other types, known as Kingfisher test kits

The test kits look similar and test for whether someone currently has coronavirus in the same way. You will be told which test kits you will be using when you receive confirmation of your delivery. All of these kits are throat and nose swab tests and will tell a person whether they had coronavirus at the time the test took place. They cannot tell a person if they have had coronavirus in the past.

 

Watch a video on how to administer nasal and throat swabs for residents:

 

Coronavirus test tutorial for care homes with Dr Sarah Jarvis

 

Carers and nurses who will be swabbing residents in care homes should complete the online care home swabbing competency assessment before carrying out swabbing.

 

Individuals can register at www.genqa.org/carehomes or care home managers can create an organisational account by contacting info@genqa.org.

 

Book your courier collection

 

A courier will collect your used testing kits. These will be taken to a lab for processing.

 

Book your courier collection by 7pm at least a day before carrying out testing.

 

Carry out testing on the day of collection.

 

Documents for care homes using the online application portal

List of essential workers and those prioritised for testing (England only)

  • all NHS and social care staff, including:
  • doctors, nurses, midwives, paramedics, social workers, care workers, and other frontline health and social care staff, including community pharmacists and their staff, volunteers and unpaid carers
  • the support and specialist staff required to maintain the UK’s health and social care sector
  • those working as part of the health and social care supply chain, including producers and distributors of medicines, and medical and personal protective equipment
  • NHS Blood and Transplant frontline staff (blood donation staff, specialist nurses for organ donation, staff running therapeutic apheresis services in NHS hospitals)
  • those providing ancillary support to NHS workers (such as hotel accommodation for NHS staff)
  • personal care assistants
  • essential public services staff, including:
  • prisons, probation, courts and tribunals staff, judiciary
  • religious staff
  • charities and workers delivering critical frontline services
  • those responsible for the management of the deceased
  • journalists and broadcasters covering coronavirus or providing public service broadcasting
  • public health and environmental staff, such as specialist community public health nursing
  • public safety and national security staff, including:
  • police and support staff
  • Ministry of Defence civilians, contractors and armed forces personnel (those critical to the delivery of critical defence and national security outputs and critical to the response to the coronavirus pandemic), including defence medical staff
  • fire and rescue service employees (including support staff),
  • National Crime Agency staff, those maintaining border security, prison and probation staff and other national security roles, including those overseas
  • British Transport Police and the Maritime and Coastguard Agency
  • transport workers, including:
  • those who keep the air, water, road and rail passenger and freight transport modes operating during the coronavirus response
  • those working on transport systems through which supply chains pass
  • education and childcare workers, including:
  • support and teaching staff
  • social workers
  • specialist education professionals
  • critical personnel in the production and distribution of food, drink and essential goods, including:
  • those involved in food production, processing, distribution, sale and delivery
  • those critical to the provision of other essential goods, such as medical supply chain and distribution workers, and testing (such as PHE labs), and veterinary medicine
  • workers critical to the continuity of essential movement of goods
  • local and national government staff critical to the effective delivery of the coronavirus response, or delivering essential public services, such as the payment of benefits
  • public and environmental health staff, including in government agencies and arm’s length bodies
  • funeral industry workers
  • frontline local authority staff and volunteers, including
  • those working with vulnerable children and adults, victims of domestic abuse, and the homeless and rough sleepers (and hotel staff supporting these groups)
  • voluntary sector organisations providing substance misuse treatment
  • utilities, communication and financial services staff, including:
  • staff needed for essential financial services provision (including but not limited to workers in banks, building societies and financial market infrastructure)
  • the oil, gas, electricity and water sectors (including sewerage)
  • information technology and data infrastructure sector and primary industry supplies to continue during the coronavirus response
  • essential staff working in the civil nuclear, chemicals, telecommunications (including but not limited to network operations, field engineering, call centre staff, IT and data infrastructure, 999 and 111 essential services), postal services and delivery, payments providers and waste disposal sectors

Read the privacy notice on coronavirus testing for essential workers.

 

Published 15 April 2020
Last updated 17 September 2020 

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Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
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Press release

New package to support and enforce self-isolation

 

People will be required by law to self-isolate from 28 September, supported by payment of £500 for those on lower incomes who cannot work from home and have lost income as a result. New fines for those breaching self-isolation rules will start at £1,000 – bringing this in line with the penalty for breaking quarantine after international travel - but could increase to up to £10,000 for repeat offences and for the most egregious breaches, including for those preventing others from self-isolating.

 

For example, this could include business owners who threaten self-isolating staff with redundancy if they do not come to work, sending a clear message that this will not be tolerated.

 

A number of steps will be taken to make sure that people are complying with the rules, these include:

  • NHS Test and Trace call handlers making regular contact with those self-isolating, with the ability to escalate any suspicion of non-compliance to Local Authorities and local police;
  • Using police resources to check compliance in highest incidence areas and in high-risk groups, based on local intelligence;
  • Investigating and prosecuting high-profile and egregious cases of non-compliance; and
  • Acting on instances where third parties have identified others who have tested positive, but are not self-isolating.

Recognising that self-isolation is one of the most powerful tools for controlling the transmission of Covid-19, this new Test and Trace Support payment of £500 will ensure that those on low incomes are able to self-isolate without worry about their finances.

 

Just under 4 million people who are in receipt of benefits in England will be eligible for this payment, which will be available to those who are required to self-isolate from 28 September.

 

Local Authorities will be working quickly to set up these self-isolation support schemes and we expect them to be in place by 12 October. Those who start to self-isolate from 28 September will receive backdated payments once the scheme is set up in their Local Authority.

 

This financial support comes as the government places a legal requirement on people to self-isolate when instructed to by NHS Test and Trace and introduces tougher fines for breaking the rules.

Many people are following the rules around self-isolation, but these steps will make sure more do and help ensure the public do not unknowingly spread the virus.

 

The Prime Minister said:

"The best way we can fight this virus is by everyone following the rules and self-isolating if they’re at risk of passing on coronavirus. And so nobody underestimates just how important this is, new regulations will mean you are legally obliged to do so if you have the virus or have been asked to do so by NHS Test and Trace."

"People who choose to ignore the rules will face significant fines. We need to do all we can to control the spread of this virus, to prevent the most vulnerable people from becoming infected, and to protect the NHS and save lives."

"And while most people are doing their absolute level best to comply with the rules, I don’t want to see a situation where people don’t feel they are financially able to self-isolate."

"That’s why we’re also introducing a new £500 Test and Trace Support payment for those on low incomes who are required by NHS Test and Trace to remain at home to help stop the spread of the virus."

 

Published 20 September 2020

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Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

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