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Your worst car

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14 hours ago, CommanderDave said:

Remember the Austin 3 litre a  straight 6 cylinder like the Austin 1800 .

Dave

The Austin Westminster was used as a police vehicle and was very quick in the sixties.  It could reach speeds of over 120mph.  I think ours with fitted with superchargers.

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Ford Escort, new to me in 1991, J220KCP. Spent more time on low loaders than with rubber on the tarmac. It's finest moment was the clutch pedal dropping to the floor on New Years Eve at the Blackpool end of the M55!

 

Russ

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I also had an Escort , mk1 , NHE100F pale metallic blue , my wife had just passed her test & was driving through Doncaster in it following me in my dads car . She set off at the Gaumont traffic lights & changed from 1st to 2nd , the gear lever came off in her hand & she coasted to a stop on Bennetthorpe . I managed to get back to her & fit the lever back in , the large nut holding it in had vibrated loose , good job it wasn’t today’s traffic & easily annoyed drivers.

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I learned to drive in a Mk 1 Escort, then bought an Anglia and learned the art of body repairs or fillng!

I like classic cars but don't would not consider the likes of Marinas and Allegro as a personal classic.

Some of the restored ones are better than when they left the factory, not difficult to achieve!

I wouldn't mind a classic Mini, had a S3 Landrover and a Classic Range Rover.

My dad used to have Austin 1100 or 1300, their quality got worse so he bought a new Toyota , which never went wrong. He never went back to BL.

He did have a few Ladas ( used as work cars)but saw the light when he retired and got a Volvo!

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3 hours ago, 664DaveS said:

 

My dad used to have Austin 1100 or 1300, their quality got worse so he bought a new Toyota , which never went wrong. He never went back to BL.

 

 

Yep, back in the 70's as a young lad I remember going with my Granddad to pick up his new cars. He had an Austin 1100, Austin 1300 and an Allegro. 

He was out in Asia in WW2 so was very reluctant to buy Jap but after the dire Allegro he bought a Toyota Starlet and then a Toyota Tercel. The Tercel he had for years until he stopped driving. My wife ran it for a few more years when he stopped driving.

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6 hours ago, stevew1 said:

I also had an Escort , mk1 , NHE100F pale metallic blue , my wife had just passed her test & was driving through Doncaster in it following me in my dads car . She set off at the Gaumont traffic lights & changed from 1st to 2nd , the gear lever came off in her hand & she coasted to a stop on Bennetthorpe . I managed to get back to her & fit the lever back in , the large nut holding it in had vibrated loose , good job it wasn’t today’s traffic & easily annoyed drivers.

Reminds me Vauxhall Victor FE.  Learning to drive in it went around a corner tried to change gear and couldn’t much swearing and blaming of me by Father. Turned out a pin the held the selecter in the gearbox in place  had snapped and moved and blocked getting any gear.   Then after I had passed my test same car the gear stick snapped you could still change gear because the cable that engaged reverse held it together.   The changes were a bit sloppy first was basically in the passenger glove box.   They don’t make cars like they used to.  Thank god. 

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2 hours ago, logiclee said:

 

 he bought a Toyota Tercel. The Tercel he had for years until he stopped driving.

Is that the one I nearly bought I wonder? Extra-low 1st gear with 4 wheel drive.  Would have loved one but couldn't drive it as my head was hard against the roof, & I'm only 5'9"! Definitely was designed by, & for,  small Japanese people LOL.

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44 minutes ago, micktheshed said:

Is that the one I nearly bought I wonder? Extra-low 1st gear with 4 wheel drive.  Would have loved one but couldn't drive it as my head was hard against the roof, & I'm only 5'9"! Definitely was designed by, & for,  small Japanese people LOL.

 

No they originally did a 3 door hatch.  A bit bigger than a Fiesta of the day.

 

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f8/1983_Toyota_Tercel_AL20_(1).jpg/960px-1983_Toyota_Tercel_AL20_(1).jpg

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55 minutes ago, micktheshed said:

Is that the one I nearly bought I wonder? Extra-low 1st gear with 4 wheel drive.  Would have loved one but couldn't drive it as my head was hard against the roof, & I'm only 5'9"! Definitely was designed by, & for,  small Japanese people LOL.

 

Size was a problem with the early Japanese imports.

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41 minutes ago, Black Grouse said:

 

Size was a problem with the early Japanese imports.

 

Although some drove great if you fit. 

 

The late 70's early 80's Starlet was the first small hatch to have rack and pinion steering, rear wheel drive, McPherson struts up front and a multilink setup at the rear. 

Well ahead of it's time and the more powerful later versions got a 5 speed box. 

 

At 750kg they were like a go-cart.

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Worst for me  is probably a 2006 Citroen C4 1.6hdi.

After 3 months it needed a replacement engine due to the common oil pick up problem they suffer. After 6 months that second engine was rumbling as well. Sold it to a guy who was willing to put a third engine into it. Awful, never a Citroen again.

Second worst was an 1999 Alfa 146 1.6 petrol.

Timing belt stripped the teeth after 29k miles and took all 16 valves out. In 2 years ownership numerous electrical problems including the fuse box having to be replaced, and with rattles appearing on a daily basis it had to go.

 

Best car is my current one,  2011 Saab 93ttid. On 185k miles and have it 6 trouble free years and have covered 120k of those. Given its a Fiat sourced engine I was initially worried but it's a good one. I keep an eye on the forums and others report similar experiences with them.  Great for towing as well.

 

Mike

 

 

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Another worst drive, not mine but owned by my sister when she was at Uni.

The Reliant Regal or "Plastic Pig". Dad and I replaced the brake shoes one weekend. Great fun getting the front up high to get the wheel and drum off! Back  axle easy.

Once done, test drive needed to bed in shoes and check adjustment.  Dad refused so I did it.

What a horrible thing, noisy bouncy and tramlined over road imperfections due to single front wheel.

Fortunately the brakes were correct so no repeat performance needed!

Would not like to do any distance in one of those beasties!

Sister only had a bike license at the time so got the 3 wheeler.

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21 hours ago, logiclee said:

 

Although some drove great if you fit. 

 

The late 70's early 80's Starlet was the first small hatch to have rack and pinion steering, rear wheel drive, McPherson struts up front and a multilink setup at the rear. 

Well ahead of it's time and the more powerful later versions got a 5 speed box. 

 

At 750kg they were like a go-cart.

Yes and if they were all like SWMBO’s it got lighter as the body rusted away. 😀.  Mechanically ran for ever but died of tin worm.  

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On 04/01/2020 at 17:59, logiclee said:

 

No they originally did a 3 door hatch.  A bit bigger than a Fiesta of the day.

 

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f8/1983_Toyota_Tercel_AL20_(1).jpg/960px-1983_Toyota_Tercel_AL20_(1).jpg

That's the one I remember! Perhaps there were 2 specs available?

 

On 05/01/2020 at 15:12, 664DaveS said:

Another worst drive, not mine but owned by my sister when she was at Uni.

The Reliant Regal or "Plastic Pig". Dad and I replaced the brake shoes one weekend. Great fun getting the front up high to get the wheel and drum off! Back  axle easy.

Once done, test drive needed to bed in shoes and check adjustment.  Dad refused so I did it.

What a horrible thing, noisy bouncy and tramlined over road imperfections due to single front wheel.

Fortunately the brakes were correct so no repeat performance needed!

Would not like to do any distance in one of those beasties!

Sister only had a bike license at the time so got the 3 wheeler.

My very first car (also only had a m.bike licence) and the 'bees knees' of the day (1967). Better spec than a Mini (winding windows, proper door locks, heater! etc.). Absolutely atrocious to drive: bouncy, wondering steering, very affected by side winds, gutless & thirsty 600cc alloy engine, very noisy (I always wore ear plugs!) & very prone to turning over (was on ludicrously large  13" wheels).  This was accepted as a Reliant characteristic. I 'only' managed it once but came close several times!
If you survived driving one of these you could drive anything! It's no wonder I found the Bond 875 such a revelation in comparison.
Three things stick in my mind:

1, when driving over a matchstick it was possible to tell if it had been used or not (really!) LOL,

2, if an approaching Reliant driver held up a no. of fingers it meant that he'd turned over that many times!  It didn't inspire any confidence that the roof would collapse to dashboard level!).

3,  the engine was fairly easy to service from the driver's seat via a large cover. I kid you not!

 

Interesting times, when cars required some skill to drive them....& indeed survive them LOL.

 

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My Bro had a Bond Ranger Van - three wheeler with a Hillman Imp engine in the back driving the rear wheels. It was the most terrifying experience of my life sitting as a passenger wondering whether it would get round corners without tipping. It was even worse driving it. The Hillman Imp engine could let you get the front wheel off the road although I never tried a proper wheelie

 

 

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I had a 'Regal' ( Del-type ) van..

A  previous owner had fitted a D-I-Y. mud flap on the cross member behind the front wheel.

This encouraged the member to rust away . leaving the front suspension almost Fully-independant

Of the body !!

It was almost impossible to drive in the snow with the front plowing the centre slush.

At work we parked on the roof, - via a 'spiral' type ramp.When you heard a 'Zzzipp' you knew the

inside wheel was getting air-bourne 

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18 minutes ago, rolywak said:

I had a 'Regal' ( Del-type ) van..

A  previous owner had fitted a D-I-Y. mud flap on the cross member behind the front wheel.

This encouraged the member to rust away . leaving the front suspension almost Fully-independant

Of the body !!

It was almost impossible to drive in the snow with the front plowing the centre slush.

At work we parked on the roof, - via a 'spiral' type ramp.When you heard a 'Zzzipp' you knew the

inside wheel was getting air-bourne 

The "Only fools and horses" van was a Supervan III not a "Regal". Surprisingly quick in a straight line if the driver was brave enough!

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17 hours ago, matelodave said:

My Bro had a Bond Ranger Van - three wheeler with a Hillman Imp engine in the back driving the rear wheels. It was the most terrifying experience of my life sitting as a passenger wondering whether it would get round corners without tipping. It was even worse driving it. The Hillman Imp engine could let you get the front wheel off the road although I never tried a proper wheelie

 

 

This description bears no resemblance to the Bond 875 (1968 van or 1971 hatchback) that I owned. & no, I'm not just remembering the good things only!  When it comes to cars (or anything else) I speak as I find.
Even allowing for the fact that my previous car was a Reliant 3/25 (which much more closely fits the description, with the definite exception of the wheelie!) the Bond 875 was  a revelation in it's day. One thing is true: it was possible to do a wheelie by  holding the brake & power-winding-up the rubber doughnuts in the drive shafts! Surprisingly didn't do them any good though.

 

As an example of the capabilities: the Bond was largely unaffected by side winds (especially the tapered clamshell  bonneted mk. 2) & got more stable the faster it went. I had a Vauxhall Viva  in 1974 which was no slouch (also keeping the Bond for another 7 years) & corners that the Viva felt safe taking at 35mph I habitually took, in the Bond, at 40/45mph with no qualms! When it snowed I preferred the Bond as the traction was superb, it just never got stuck, though on one occasion 11" (300mm)+ of overnight snow packed under the front bodywork causing the front wheel to lift & act more like a boat tiller!

 

If anyone remembers the horrific snowfall of 1969: it took me 5 hours to travel the 18 mile that normally took 40 mins (from Coventry to Leir (a small village nr. Lutterworth) due to traffic hold-ups & snow drifts. I spent most of my time digging other people out so I could get by! Living out in the country, at the time, being self-sufficient was essential as snow drifts of up to 3 feet had to be dealt with most winters. The Bond ploughed through them all, granted with some difficulty, but on one occasion, a Land Rover following me got stuck & had to be pulled out by tractor LOL.

 

I well remember on several instances of travelling down single-track lanes, with snow banked-up both sides, meeting cars coming the other way & digging out enough room for me to back into. Everyone but me being surprised that I pulled away again with no trouble. This doesn't sound anything  like  the car 'matelodave' is describing, to me.

 

Mind you, I would seriously hesitate to attempt some of the things I did then even with my present 4X4 Terrano!

 

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On 04/01/2020 at 19:01, logiclee said:

 

Although some drove great if you fit. 

 

The late 70's early 80's Starlet was the first small hatch to have rack and pinion steering, rear wheel drive, McPherson struts up front and a multilink setup at the rear. 

Well ahead of it's time and the more powerful later versions got a 5 speed box. 

 

At 750kg they were like a go-cart.

My son has 3 starlets and a Glanza (updated Starlet).  One of the Starlets he has setup for track days and it manages to hang on to some very capable Imprezza's and Accords, on the last track day a Porsche had an issue trying to remove it from it's back bumper LOL. The Glanza, similar weight but 504 bhp from it's 1300cc engine, it makes life very interesting, it is a complete sleeper too apart from its 4" Exhaust.

 

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VW Golf, 2nd generation. My daughter's but I had to maintain it. Constant problems the worst of which was random cutting out of the ignition.  I gave up trying to trace it and took it to an auto electrical specialist, and they gave up too. In the end it caught fire out on the road and burned out. Could say that was the worst problem, but more a blessed relief.

 

IDK how VWs got a reputation for relibility (have they still?). It was probably from their air-cooled days when there was less to go wrong. OTOH my wife had a succession of BL Metros over the years (and passed down to daughter too) and they were utterly dependable.  It was a shame that the media had it in for Metros from Day 1, helping to kill the UK car industry.

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35 minutes ago, AJGalaxy2012 said:

My son has 3 starlets and a Glanza (updated Starlet).  One of the Starlets he has setup for track days and it manages to hang on to some very capable Imprezza's and Accords, on the last track day a Porsche had an issue trying to remove it from it's back bumper LOL. The Glanza, similar weight but 504 bhp from it's 1300cc engine, it makes life very interesting, it is a complete sleeper too apart from its 4" Exhaust.

 

 

504 BHP !  Wow that’s some engine 😎

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3 minutes ago, Bolingbroke said:

IDK how VWs got a reputation for reliability

 

From a very long and expensive advertising campaign.

 

i.e "If only everything in life was as reliable as a Volkswagen" which ran for years

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2 minutes ago, Lost in France said:

 

From a very long and expensive advertising campaign.

 

i.e "If only everything in life was as reliable as a Volkswagen" which ran for years

 

To be fair, VW's competitors were pretty unreliable for many decades.

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28 minutes ago, Black Grouse said:

 

To be fair, VW's competitors were pretty unreliable for many decades.

 

True but the Volkswagen 'drop' advert was aimed fairly and squarely at Japanese cars which were actually pretty reliable.

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My girlfriend at the time, now my wife bought a Datsun Cherry 1300 from her boss for about £600.  It was old but low mileage and lots of rust although interior was immaculate.  After several months ownership every time we reversed, there would be a loud clunk.  We then discovered that when the shock was fixed to the body on the nearside rear it was rusted away. 

We carried on using the car like that for about another 18 months as it was mainly around the town and then sold it when I got a company car.  We sold it for a bit more than she paid for it as the engine was very much in demand. 

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