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Fireman Iain

The future of Battery Electric Vehicles?

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I am just back from walking my dog (don't start) during which I overheard a conversation between a police officer and a Nissan leaf driver. Apparently the policeman thought that it was not appropriate for the Leaf to be driving just on "sidelights", whilst the Leaf driver thought that he would not have enough battery power to get home if he turned on the headlamps. Personally I am not interested in having an electric vehicle until they can tow a caravan 300 miles, "fill up" and be  ready to continue the journey 10 minutes later. B)

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4 minutes ago, Flat_at said:

. Personally I am not interested in having an electric vehicle until they can tow a caravan 300 miles, "fill up" and be  ready to continue the journey 10 minutes later. B)

 

Me neither, I think it’ll be time to move on from caravanning if we can’t go much more than 25 miles without a recharge but can’t have a fossil fuel powered vehicle anymore.

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37 minutes ago, Flat_at said:

I am just back from walking my dog (don't start) during which I overheard a conversation between a police officer and a Nissan leaf driver. Apparently the policeman thought that it was not appropriate for the Leaf to be driving just on "sidelights", whilst the Leaf driver thought that he would not have enough battery power to get home if he turned on the headlamps. Personally I am not interested in having an electric vehicle until they can tow a caravan 300 miles, "fill up" and be  ready to continue the journey 10 minutes later. B)

Sounds like this was after sunset - lighting up time.  The Leaf driver has no more right to drive without headlights than any other driver.  Lucky if he didn't get a ticket.  And made to park the car and get a taxi or a freind to pick him up.

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30 minutes ago, kelper said:

Sounds like this was after sunset - lighting up time.  The Leaf driver has no more right to drive without headlights than any other driver.  Lucky if he didn't get a ticket.  And made to park the car and get a taxi or a freind to pick him up.

 

Flat_at doesn't state whether it was in a lit area or whether it was more than 30 minutes after sunset, ie after lighting-up time  - "not appropriate" might imply that it wasn't recommended rather than an offence had been committed - but I agree that EVs have no justification to reduce lighting just because the battery is low.

Edited by Black Grouse

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1 hour ago, Flat_at said:

 Personally I am not interested in having an electric vehicle until they can tow a caravan 300 miles, "fill up" and be  ready to continue the journey 10 minutes later. B)

I would add to that list being affordable and there being an adequate charging infrastructure.

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9 minutes ago, Black Grouse said:

 

Flat_at doesn't state whether it was in a lit area or whether it was more than 30 minutes after sunset, ie after lighting-up time  - "not appropriate" might imply that it wasn't recommended rather than an offence had been committed - but I agree that EVs have no justification to reduce lighting just because the battery is low.

 It was dark, well after lighting up time. I couldn't stay and watch what happened next as it was starting to rain and my dog doesn't  do "wet" so we had to rush home. ;)

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16 minutes ago, Stevan said:

I would add to that list being affordable and there being an adequate charging infrastructure.

It's funny all the Talk about the charging infrastructure, since having the PHEV I've taken note whilst at services and in car parks etc, only once have I seen another vehicle on charge, there's plenty of availability at the moment!

 

 

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14 minutes ago, AJGalaxy2012 said:

It's funny all the Talk about the charging infrastructure, since having the PHEV I've taken note whilst at services and in car parks etc, only once have I seen another vehicle on charge, there's plenty of availability at the moment!

 

 

 

The devices may be unoccupied but are they actually working? The unreliability of public charging  outlets is far and away the number one gripe of the local EV owners community in my area. 

 

I'm sure things will improve, but that is the current state of play. 

Edited by jetA1

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27 minutes ago, jetA1 said:

 

The devices may be unoccupied but are they actually working? The unreliability of public charging  outlets is far and away the number one gripe of the local EV owners community in my area. 

 

I'm sure things will improve, but that is the current state of play. 

I havent found a single one not working so far.

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4 hours ago, Mr Plodd said:

And This review of the new VW Passat (it’s a hybrid not fully BEV) makes REALLY interesting reading, it would appear  that VW have successfully nailed the task of producing a decent hybrid towcar.

 

Andy


yip, the Dutch use them (and other VAG 1.4TSi hybrid’s) extensively

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1 hour ago, Flat_at said:

 It was dark, well after lighting up time. I couldn't stay and watch what happened next as it was starting to rain and my dog doesn't  do "wet" so we had to rush home. ;)

 

But if there were street lights then headlights aren't a legal requirement.

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1 hour ago, AJGalaxy2012 said:

It's funny all the Talk about the charging infrastructure, since having the PHEV I've taken note whilst at services and in car parks etc, only once have I seen another vehicle on charge, there's plenty of availability at the moment!

 

 

A bit of a "chicken and egg scenario"! Without enough BEVs there is little incentive to fit many charging points, but without enough charging points in the right places who will buy a BEV?

It is easy enough to add 3 or 4 low speed charging points to take advantage of surplus capacity in a motorway service area or Ikea car park, but something else altogether to either increase this to several dozen fast charge points, or to add even two or three fast charge points into many other places. I have never seen an electric charging point with space for a caravan! We are a long way from an adequate charging infrastructure.

 

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On 15/01/2020 at 17:25, AJGalaxy2012 said:

With a PHEV they are allowed to quote MPG with full batteries well what's the point in that?

 

The point is to fool the politicians who make the laws about this stuff. Politicians generally have a very poor grasp of anything technical.

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8 hours ago, FrankBullet said:


yip, the Dutch use them (and other VAG 1.4TSi hybrid’s) extensively

 

There's a more powerfull 245PS 1.4TSi hybrid coming soon. 

 

 

10 hours ago, Flat_at said:

 It was dark, well after lighting up time. I couldn't stay and watch what happened next as it was starting to rain and my dog doesn't  do "wet" so we had to rush home. ;)

 

If it was a new Leaf don't they have LED headlights? 

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YES in fact i think they all have led lights; from experience lights/radio wipers etc don' t make much difference BUT the heater takes 10miles off the range-very high draw. if he had run out of juice Nissan would have recovered him-they do for flat batteries if you don't do it too often. The other great idea they do is free fossil fuelled car for 2 weeks a year for the  first 3 years so you can go on a long journey!!!

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9 hours ago, Bolingbroke said:

 

The point is to fool the politicians who make the laws about this stuff. Politicians generally have a very poor grasp of anything technical.

 

More like to fool the motorist who can be hoodwinked into buying one without a clear understanding of what they're getting ... 

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Passed a Tesla the other day, i assumed he had run out of juice due to the way the car was parked (Abandoned)

Strange he did not  seem to have that Tesla Drivers smugnes look on his face

Edited by AndyPoole

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33 minutes ago, jetA1 said:

 

More like to fool the motorist who can be hoodwinked into buying one without a clear understanding of what they're getting ... 

 

The stupidity of people indeed never ceases to amaze me. If they are prepared to shell out £40K+ on a product they don't understand and have not researched if it suits their requirements then I have little sympathy.

 

Manufacturers comply with legislation and publish the figures they are required to by that legislation.  

 

But there's no shortage of real information out there for buyers to research.

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10 hours ago, Bolingbroke said:

 

The point is to fool the politicians who make the laws about this stuff. Politicians generally have a very poor grasp of anything technical.

TBH politicians have a pretty poor grasp of almost anything :(

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Just now, matelodave said:

TBH politicians have a pretty poor grasp of almost anything :(

 

They seem  to come out of it nicely funded and with "die for" pensions, possibly a better "grasp on things" that I have.

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3 minutes ago, matelodave said:

TBH politicians have a pretty poor grasp of almost anything :(

Apart from their own wallets!

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5 hours ago, matelodave said:

TBH politicians have a pretty poor grasp of almost anything :(

As long as they can Talk about it confidently then that is all that matters. Since most live in London they do not need to know about cars.

 

Car reviews could do with saying how many kW are needed to charge the batteries. Then when quoting mpg you can add on the kW needed to see the full environment impact from the petrol used by the engine and the gas burnt at the power station since we do not yet have enough renewables to supply electrical demand now. In the Passat hybrid review I think it quoted 42 mpg on a long run (72 miles) and 29 mpg towing but on top of that would be charging the batteries before setting off. Adding the battery charging the hybrid is going to contribute more to global warming than a diesel or possibly even just a petrol. The hybrid only benefit is to reduce pollution in towns when running on batteries.

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2 hours ago, Paul1957 said:

As long as they can Talk about it confidently then that is all that matters. Since most live in London they do not need to know about cars.

 

Car reviews could do with saying how many kW are needed to charge the batteries. Then when quoting mpg you can add on the kW needed to see the full environment impact from the petrol used by the engine and the gas burnt at the power station since we do not yet have enough renewables to supply electrical demand now. In the Passat hybrid review I think it quoted 42 mpg on a long run (72 miles) and 29 mpg towing but on top of that would be charging the batteries before setting off. Adding the battery charging the hybrid is going to contribute more to global warming than a diesel or possibly even just a petrol. The hybrid only benefit is to reduce pollution in towns when running on batteries.

 

Evidence for that or is it just your opinion?

 

 

Hybrids reduce pollution by recouping energy in braking which can used for moving off. Plug in hybrids are better because you can use them as an electric vehicle for shorter journeys.

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3 minutes ago, AJGalaxy2012 said:

 

Evidence for that or is it just your opinion?

 

 

Hybrids reduce pollution by recouping energy in braking which can used for moving off. Plug in hybrids are better because you can use them as an electric vehicle for shorter journeys.

 

But if no appreciable braking is involved, say several hours on a French Autoroute, there will be nothing to recover, but still the battery mass to be transported, by the ICE doing the work.

Hybrids, only win in cases where their attributes outweigh the above  scenario, not a universal solution but horses for courses. Great, but only for the right applications.

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Unfortunately we only get a very lopsided view of the issues.

It is political suicide for any politician to say anything against the green or ecological lobby, and there is no pressure group with the aim of keeping those lobbies honest!

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