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Lozzyf

Hook up to wattage calculation?

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5 hours ago, Stevan said:

Not so, Gordon!

Because the resistance or impedance remains constant higher voltage means higher current and wattage. Give a heating appliance an over voltage and it will run hotter and draw more current. 

Gordon is correct.  What you say is exactly what he said!

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18 minutes ago, kelper said:

Gordon is correct.  What you say is exactly what he said!

OOPS! My misreading of Gordon's post!

Sorry Gordon.

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My apologies to the OP - yet another senior moment! Oh, and I have an opticians appointment (NOT Specsavers) tomorrow week.....  :)

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5 minutes ago, Woodentop said:

My apologies to the OP - yet another senior moment! Oh, and I have an opticians appointment (NOT Specsavers) tomorrow week.....  :)

no worries xx

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1 hour ago, Woodentop said:

My apologies to the OP - yet another senior moment! Oh, and I have an opticians appointment (NOT Specsavers) tomorrow week.....  :)

 

      Specsavers branches are franchises.  You may have found a poor franchise but there are many more good ones around.  Any given Specsavers outlet is as good as its management and staff.  

 

     John.

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5 hours ago, Guzzilazz said:

UK mains voltage is not 240... it's 230.  The permissible range is -5%to +10% or 218 to 253V.

 

Whilst Watts=Amps x Volts is ok for resistive loads (heaters with no motor element) any inductive load (e.g. electric motors) the starting current draw will be much higher than a resistive load

Uk voltage in this country is generated at 240v ac Europe generates at 220v ac the 230v ac is a harmonisation of them both.

 

Edited by borrowdale
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Wattage/Current calculations have been done to death here, so I won't go through that again.

 

In the real world of caravanning, I find the biggest variable in trying to manage the current I draw from (say) a 16 Amp supply is the water heater.

If the hot water is up to temperature, the water heater isn't drawing any current at all.

However I only have to run the tap -  to do some washing up say - and the water heater starts to draw 2 kW or 8 Amps - which is a big slice of the available 16 Amp.

 

Using the kettle, microwave  or some other equipment involves me throwing the switch, so I know that I'm drawing current.

The water heater does its own thing and doesn't tell me when it's  on or off.

 

P.S. The battery charger also draws an amount of current which varies all the time.

 

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23 hours ago, Lozzyf said:

 

 . . . I’m a “she” btw but that aside I will be using my outside plug socket . . So I’m guessing 16A ? But won’t the pillar trip before any of my fuses ?

 

I realise you have had a long set of confusing responses as is normal with forums, when you just want a simple answer, but can I ask a favour? Please don't call them plug sockets. All sockets are designed for plugs! Plug sockets doesn't make any sense. If you want to be correct, call it a mains socket, otherwise its simply a socket as in outside socket. On forums such as this, it also helps differentiate between low voltage 12v sockets by using the term mains socket.

 

Sorry, rant over but its one of my pet hates. Even came across it in a Kindle book recently. Ugh!

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6 minutes ago, thebriars said:

Please don't call them plug sockets. All sockets are designed for plugs!

Eye sockets aren't. Neither are light sockets! So, indeed plug sockets are designed for plugs!

Edited by Easy T
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4 minutes ago, thebriars said:

 

I realise you have had a long set of confusing responses as is normal with forums, when you just want a simple answer, but can I ask a favour? Please don't call them plug sockets. All sockets are designed for plugs! Plug sockets doesn't make any sense. If you want to be correct, call it a mains socket, otherwise its simply a socket as in outside socket. On forums such as this, it also helps differentiate between low voltage 12v sockets by using the term mains socket.

 

 

oh dear, I understand where you're coming from and that you get annoyed  when the correct term isn't used , but there are a lot of folk , even on here , who don't always know the correct term for things , so they  (we) use as much information as we can to get the meaning across.  Sometimes the word s we use are related to the dialect of the place that we live  or the words that the family use.  So long as you get the gist of what is being said . This reminds me of years ago when I was on the CMC forum and  some folk on there would correct our grammar.

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1 hour ago, thebriars said:

 

I realise you have had a long set of confusing responses as is normal with forums, when you just want a simple answer, but can I ask a favour? Please don't call them plug sockets. All sockets are designed for plugs! Plug sockets doesn't make any sense. If you want to be correct, call it a mains socket, otherwise its simply a socket as in outside socket. On forums such as this, it also helps differentiate between low voltage 12v sockets by using the term mains socket.

 

Sorry, rant over but its one of my pet hates. Even came across it in a Kindle book recently. Ugh!

I’m standing in the corner now , big hat with “D” on it 🙈💕

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5 minutes ago, Lozzyf said:
1 hour ago, thebriars said:

 

I realise you have had a long set of confusing responses as is normal with forums, when you just want a simple answer, but can I ask a favour? Please don't call them plug sockets. All sockets are designed for plugs! Plug sockets doesn't make any sense. If you want to be correct, call it a mains socket, otherwise its simply a socket as in outside socket. On forums such as this, it also helps differentiate between low voltage 12v sockets by using the term mains socket.

 

Sorry, rant over but its one of my pet hates. Even came across it in a Kindle book recently. Ugh!

 

1 hour ago, joanie said:

oh dear, I understand where you're coming from and that you get annoyed  when the correct term isn't used , but there are a lot of folk , even on here , who don't always know the correct term for things , so they  (we) use as much information as we can to get the meaning across.  Sometimes the word s we use are related to the dialect of the place that we live  or the words that the family use.  So long as you get the gist of what is being said . This reminds me of years ago when I was on the CMC forum and  some folk on there would correct our grammar.

 

6 minutes ago, Lozzyf said:

I’m standing in the corner now , big hat with “D” on it 🙈💕

 

 

Please feel free to call them whatever you want, most people will understand  and try to help and offer you useful advice.

 

An eye socket isn't designed for plugs :)

A plumbers socket isn't designed for plugs ;)

A socket can be a software object that acts as an end point establishing a bidirectional network communication link between a server-side and a client-side program. :)

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Grandpa Steve said:

 

Please feel free to call them whatever you want, most people will understand  and try to help and offer you useful advice.

 

An eye socket isn't designed for plugs :)

A plumbers socket isn't designed for plugs ;)

A socket can be a software object that acts as an end point establishing a bidirectional network communication link between a server-side and a client-side program. :)

 

 

Not to mention hip sockets and cigar lighter sockets! Or in the caravan context, a water inlet socket!

Edited by Stevan
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Yes I know uk mains voltage and the ins and outs etc BUT the OP wanted simple and therefore it is easiest to simply do what I said-the details and complications aren't needed on site!

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1 hour ago, Stevan said:

Not to mention hip sockets and cigar lighter sockets! Or in the caravan context, a water inlet socket!

 

Socket to him Stevan!

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To add to the confusion to this post, sorry but it's the voltage that seems to be causing confusion. 

As stated in one of the posts above, the resistance of a piece of equipment remains constant, whatever the supply voltage. 

The wattage stated on all modern equipment is based on the nominal voltage of 230V, so, for simplicity this is the figure you should use for a simple calculation of likely current. 

The fact that the wattage will increase or decrease in line with the actual supply voltage only makes to confuse things.

A circuit breaker will take a very long time to trip with a marginal overload so any variation can, more or less,  be ignored for the purposes of the simple calculation. 

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Wow. What a lot replies for something so simple. 

In the UK, a 1kw load draws a bit over 4A.  

For simple maths just make sure your total load does not exceed 3.5 kw on a 16a  supply

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7 hours ago, Stevan said:

Not to mention hip sockets and cigar lighter sockets! Or in the caravan context, a water inlet socket!

 Then there's socket sets ;)

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13 amp socket.   :)

     John.

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I've just returned from an enforced absence from the forum with a "busted foot"  and oh dear, we really have drifted off topic haven't we :D

I've always tried to use the term "lamps" for devices that emit light (not bulbs) and "plug tops" for devices inserted into "wall sockets" but that is because of my background and I fully appreciate that alternative terms are used by the general population. I still find it grates though when I hear the term "plug-socket", as it cannot be both a plug and a socket. Sometimes connections in both electrical and mechanical engineering are referred to as a "male" or "female" fittings for the simple reason that at the time the terms were adopted, they were mutually exclusive.

But I digress, and whatever terms are used, so long as we understand each other, that really is all that matters.

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25 minutes ago, Gordon said:

I've just returned from an enforced absence from the forum with a "busted foot"  and oh dear, we really have drifted off topic haven't we :D

I've always tried to use the term "lamps" for devices that emit light (not bulbs) and "plug tops" for devices inserted into "wall sockets" but that is because of my background and I fully appreciate that alternative terms are used by the general population. I still find it grates though when I hear the term "plug-socket", as it cannot be both a plug and a socket. Sometimes connections in both electrical and mechanical engineering are referred to as a "male" or "female" fittings for the simple reason that at the time the terms were adopted, they were mutually exclusive.

But I digress, and whatever terms are used, so long as we understand each other, that really is all that matters.

Completely off topic but, when you drafted that post you had all six cylinders of your anti-pedant machine running flat out in the background. Well done. I cant fault it. 

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Isn't a lamp what you fit in a luminaire?

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45 minutes ago, Ern said:

I still find it grates though when I hear the term "plug-socket", as it cannot be both a plug and a socket.

Oh dear, Oh dear. A lame pedant is a sad thing indeed. A plug socket is a socket that accepts a plug and is normally thought of as an electrical component . An eye socket accepts an eye, a plug blocks a sink.  There are many forms of socket but only a plug socket is thought of as accepting an electrical plug

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2 hours ago, Gordon said:

I still find it grates though when I hear the term "plug-socket", as it cannot be both a plug and a socket. Sometimes connections in both electrical and mechanical engineering are referred to as a "male" or "female" fittings for the simple reason that at the time the terms were adopted, they were mutually exclusive.

But I digress, and whatever terms are used, so long as we understand each other, that really is all that matters.

 

What do you call a 'connector' which has, within its body, both male and female fittings?

 

"In the trade" we started calling these "Plockets" - since they were neither one nor t'other, but both at the same time.

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