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George&Ade

Measuring Noseweight on slope

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I recently purchased a Milenco noseweight gauge for the caravan and would appreciate some advice.

We are part exchanging our present caravan in December and during the handover with our newer one,I am going to measure the noseweight before I hook up to car while it is empty.

Its going to be stored on our drive which has a very slight slope.

I realise you should measure noseweight with the van as it would be if attached to the car.

To do this,I would have to raise the front of the van slightly(approx. 3-4 inches.

Would it be best to stand the gauge on say,a breezeblock or would the slight slope not make any difference to measurement?

Hope this makes sense.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, George&Ade said:

I recently purchased a Milenco noseweight gauge for the caravan and would appreciate some advice.

We are part exchanging our present caravan in December and during the handover with our newer one,I am going to measure the noseweight before I hook up to car while it is empty.

Its going to be stored on our drive which has a very slight slope.

I realise you should measure noseweight with the van as it would be if attached to the car.

To do this,I would have to raise the front of the van slightly(approx. 3-4 inches.

Would it be best to stand the gauge on say,a breezeblock or would the slight slope not make any difference to measurement?

Hope this makes sense.

 

 

A bit pointless doing the nose weight when empty as it will change dramatically when the caravan is loaded up.  BTW it is always best to load up the caravan prior to towing as you could experienced a very uncomfortable tow due to see sawing.

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To get an accurate measurement, I do what you are describing with a chunk of wood.  If a breeze block or brick brings your 'van level that would be a good thing to use.  Load the 'van first, as Durbanite says.

    John.

Edited by Leedslad

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Weigh it level and then with the slope and see if the difference is significant.

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Easier, do the maths, and you will find that it has to be quite a bit off level to make any difference, especially when you consider the accuracy of the gauge in the first place. 3-4" will make very little difference.

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Thanks for replies.

Im only going to measure noseweight before I collect it as im going to take some "ballast" with me incase its really light on the front for the journey home.

Point also taken about taking reading on level and then on my sloping drive.

Many thanks

 

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To do the maths, you would need to know the position of the the centre of gravity, both horizontally and vertically.  But I agree the slope probably won't make a significant difference.

Edited by kelper

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There is a slight uphill slope, about 8 degrees. where I store my Pursuit and when I measure the nose weight, facing uphill with the Milenco gauge, it indicates 10kg less than when measured on a level pitch, so 60 kgs stored is 70kgs level.

 

As long as I use those figures, I get the nose weight to 70kgs, which is the max tow hitch weight for my car, it tows nicely.

 

Strangely for me, I haven't weighed it out on the road, before hitching up, as it is then facing downhill.  I might do it next time we take the 'van out for a spin.

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I measured my nose weight in storage where the van is on a slope, not massive, but still there non the less, the nose weight was 10 kg heavier on the slope than it was when measured on the flat a few minutes later.

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Use  block(s) to level caravan when fully loaded for an accurate noseweight as possible 

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3 hours ago, George&Ade said:

Thanks for replies.

Im only going to measure noseweight before I collect it as im going to take some "ballast" with me incase its really light on the front for the journey home.

Point also taken about taking reading on level and then on my sloping drive.

Many thanks

 

 I checked the noseweight when we picked up our present van and found that it was way over what was allowed by our towcar (2011 Kia Rio 50kg) so used water in the aquaroll, filled at the dealers, as ballast for our trip home via a weighbridge to check the unladen weight. :rolleyes:

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My max noseweight for car is 100kg.

New van is also 100kg.

Ive found in the past with previous caravans,approx.85-90 kg has worked well in terms of ride quality and stability.

With the newer van it will be a case of trial and error.

Ive taken on board all suggestions and thanks for all replies👍

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4 hours ago, Durbanite said:

A bit pointless doing the nose weight when empty as it will change dramatically when the caravan is loaded up.  BTW it is always best to load up the caravan prior to towing as you could experienced a very uncomfortable tow due to see sawing.

 

Why is it pointless?  And for that matter surely it's something the OP will decide as being pointless or for some legitimate reason.  (I can think of a couple at least - can't you?)

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17 hours ago, George&Ade said:

I recently purchased a Milenco noseweight gauge for the caravan and would appreciate some advice.

I realise you should measure noseweight with the van as it would be if attached to the car.

would the slight slope not make any difference to measurement?

Then look no further than our website page.

Link

You should measure the noseweight with the caravan as it will be when being towed. That is to say level fore and aft, or slightly nose down, depending upon your hitch height when both car and caravan are loaded, disregarding any sloping ground the caravan may be on, and using true horizontal for a reference. 

I hope this makes sense.

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Our drive slopes, so I load the van when we are going away, get it out of the drive using the movers (it is a narrow road so it can't be towed out) and then hitch up and drive about half a mile out of the village to a flat section of road which is also wide enough for me to safely stop and check the nose weight.

 

I use a Reich electronic nose weight gauge (the one for TA caravans), then do any adjustments with the loading to get the nose weight to 85-90 kgs. The caravan limit is 100 kgs, my truck (Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian) limit is 115 kgs. It sounds a bit of a faff but it's only a 5 minute job.

 

Now we have used the new 'van a few times I have a good idea how to load it in the first place. First couple of times required a bit more jiggling about with weight distribution.

 

BH

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15 hours ago, SuperRed said:

I measured my nose weight in storage where the van is on a slope, not massive, but still there non the less, the nose weight was 10 kg heavier on the slope than it was when measured on the flat a few minutes later.

Which is probably about the same as the accuracy of a nose weight gauge.

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