Jump to content
limecc

LED conversion of 8w Strip Lights

Recommended Posts

I'm having great fun renovating an old 1998 Bailey. Our big Fleetwood is quite boring in comparison, there's nothing to do.

I wanted to modernise the light fittings but needed to keep costs down for the owner. It wasn't possible to do a straightforward bulb swop as the original lights were based on 12v 8w fluorescent tubes. Hopefully the pictures tell the story. A 5m reel of 5050 waterproof led strip costs less than £5 and is enough to do many lights. In addition I used some aluminium tape, heatshrink and a bit of hot glue.

Old vs New.jpg

8w 12v fluorescent.jpg

Unsoldered circuit board.jpg

Applied Aluminium tape.jpg

Self Adhesive 5050 led.jpg

Rear connections made.jpg

Conversion complete.jpg

Direct comparison.jpg

Led filtered.jpg

Fluorescent filtered.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did a similar job in my mate's boat - you now need sunglasses in the cabin when they are on :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:goodpost:

 

Now added to Quick find index under lighting.

 

If you have the time, could you give any tips or advice for anyone without electrical experience concerning this conversion. Thanks.

 

 

Edited by BOAC
URL added

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, BOAC said:

:goodpost:

 

 

 

If you have the time, could you give any tips or advice for anyone without electrical experience concerning this conversion. Thanks.

 

 

Buy a spare to practice on, before wrecking an original!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think its far better to have tips and advice rather than waste £10 odd on doing that. Each to their own though  ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I decided to redesign the conversion after I left the light on for four or five hours. The LEDs did not have sufficient heatsinking and were starting to get a strange tint although still working and shining very brightly.

On EBay I found some 3mm aluminium flat bar, 50mm wide which was being sold for £9.28/m which was perfect for my four 10" lights. I affixed it with 50mm double sided foam tape.

This time I only used one strip of LEDs as these 5630's (600 led/m) are so bright and it halves the current usage and hence heat output. I had the idea to use some luminous tape next to the switch so it's easy to locate in pitch black. Here's a photo:

mk2 with heatsink.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to give another update to this topic in case anyone is following in my footsteps. In short, don't buy 5630 LED strips.

 

The heatsinking is working reasonably well but I've had problems using the same strip stuck directly underneath the kitchen overhead lockers to the wood and a couple of individual leds on a converted light. After an extended period of being used, the 5630's get too hot and get a horrible yellowy tint which may have been hastened because the van was on mains hookup and had 13.9v from the charger instead of 12.5v from the battery. It appears they put out too much heat to be of practical value. I've spent another fiver and have switched to 5050 led strip so it's not a disaster in terms of cost but it means I've got to revisit jobs that I thought were complete.

 

Here's a useful table:

LED    Dimensions                Chip Surface Area   Lumen              Power

3528, 3.5 mm x 2.8 mm,   9.8 mm²                          6 lumens,       20 mA,         0.06 Watt

5050, 5.0 mm x 5.0 mm,   25 mm²                           18 lumens,    60 mA,         0.18 Watt

5630, 5.6 mm x 3.0 mm,   16.8 mm²                       50 lumens,    150 mA,      0.50 Watt

 

A 5050 LED actually contains 3 sets of 3528 LED chips inside. So a 5050 LED is actual a combination of 3x 3528 chips in 1. The 5630 (5730) LED is basically a stretched 5050 LED with a much wider viewing angle. Making the 5630 (5730) LED the brightest of all 3 with the lowest power consumption per watts. The wider angle makes it easy to emit a brighter output with the same wattage

https://www.12vmonster.com/blogs/product-questions/7698543-so-what-the-the-difference-between-a-3528-led-5050-led-and-5630-5730-led

Edited by limecc
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For LEDs to run that hot suggests that they, or the voltage reducing components, are running well over voltage. It might be worth trying two lengths in series.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, limecc said:

I have to give another update to this topic in case anyone is following in my footsteps. In short, don't buy 5630 LED strips.

 

 

 

 

:goodpost::Thankyou:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Stevan said:

For LEDs to run that hot suggests that they, or the voltage reducing components, are running well over voltage. It might be worth trying two lengths in series.

Impossible to do.

 

The strips consist of dozens of sections each consisting 3 leds then a SMD resistor - all daisy chained together in series. You can therefore cut them to length, minimum one (~40mm) section, or use the entire 5m reel in one go. They are designed to work at 12v and are not being overdriven. You could underdrive them but would have to work out the correct resister value to place in the supply cable each time or else they would not be a consistent brightness.

Edited by limecc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you could use one of these to control and  limit the voltage - https://www.amazon.co.uk/LM2596-Converter-3-0-40V-1-5-35V-Supply/dp/B01GJ0SC2C, they are cheap and work well.

 

I use a couple to run 12v LED strips  and a 5v Raspberry Pi  from the 24v power supply on my 3D printer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, matelodave said:

you could use one of these to control and  limit the voltage - https://www.amazon.co.uk/LM2596-Converter-3-0-40V-1-5-35V-Supply/dp/B01GJ0SC2C, they are cheap and work well.

 

I use a couple to run 12v LED strips  and a 5v Raspberry Pi  from the 24v power supply on my 3D printer

You still have to guess the undervoltage to get the correct dimming. Could just buy a variable resistor? In any case the supply voltage is already correct at 12v.

Edited by limecc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, limecc said:

You still have to work out the value/voltage to get the correct dimming. Could just buy a variable resistor? In any case the supply voltage is already correct.

The voltage across a resistor will vary according to the current flowing and the voltage applied to the circuit, so if the applied voltage varies between 13.8  and 12.5, the voltage across the resistor and the strip will vary in the same proportion whereas the buck converter stabilises the voltage. All you need to do is adjust the output voltage to say 11.5v and it will stay at 11.5 even if the input voltage varies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For anyone new to this thread, or new to LED’s SOME are polarity sensitive so they will only function if connected a certain way. If you connect them up and they don’t light up, simply swop the polarity of the feed wires around.

 

Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, matelodave said:

The voltage across a resistor will vary according to the current flowing and the voltage applied to the circuit, so if the applied voltage varies between 13.8  and 12.5, the voltage across the resistor and the strip will vary in the same proportion whereas the buck converter stabilises the voltage. All you need to do is adjust the output voltage to say 11.5v and it will stay at 11.5 even if the input voltage varies.

It might be worth a try but I think unless a more efficient chip design comes along, probably better sticking to 5050's in the first place? Waterproof vs non-waterproof may be a factor as the waterproof version sees the strip encased in clear flexible resin which may impede heat loss. Brighter is not always better.

 

I am installing some 3528 300led/m strip around the rest of the van which will be ok for general use but want something brighter in the kitchen area

Edited by limecc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...