Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Excuse me if this is the wrong place.  But the payload thing is confusing me a little. If for example your tow vehicle is large enough to carry everything you want to take, would it be better just just load the car, or are there advantages from a towing perspective to having some weight in the van. 

My inclination is to load the car , but i am more than happy to be educated. Thanks in advance Steve 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Caravan are more stable with a decent nose weight as long as the weight doesn't exceed the nose weight limit the lowest of: Car, Van or Aftermarket Bar Limit. A light front ended van is awful.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you , that's the kind of advice i was looking for, so is it the general opinion that nose weight is most critical.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, stephendutton63 said:

Thank you , that's the kind of advice i was looking for, so is it the general opinion that nose weight is most critical.

 

Noseweight can be critical, although some outfits seem to be more sensitive to having adequate noseweight than others.

 

The only disadvantage of loading as much as possible in the car is that one may exceed the maximum permissible rear axle load of the car, especially once the caravan is hitched.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your better off loading the car with heavy items and with a caravan having about 100 kg after a battery and mover is deducted from payload . Cutlery and crockery ,clothes,bedding personal items your be lucky to have any spare weight .

 

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave
  • +1 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMHO I find some weight over the axle also helps.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great advice chaps, so it seems it boils down a little to personal experience and/or preference . We are planning on taking our first reasonably long trip around Easter ( 250 miles or so ) and would like by then, to have a decent understanding ( with help from you guys ) of how to get the best towing experience. So thanks and keep the tips coming 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our caravan is kept in storage so everything has to go in the car. Only things in the caravan are the battery and water containers and its spare wheel is put on the floor in the front to help get the nose weight high enough. When our daughter used to go away with us,  the bulky things like pillows were put on the caravan front seats once we got to the storage site to give more room inside the car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, CommanderDave said:

Your better off loading the car with heavy items and with a caravan having about 100 kg after a battery and mover is deducted from payload . Cutlery and crockery ,clothes,bedding personal items your be lucky to have any spare weight .

 

 

Dave

  This is my opinion too, so over and above the items which Dave has listed we carry in the car, awning and carpet , outdoor chairs and table and some coats, boots and shoes.  I recommend that OP Dave does this, keeping loading low in the ‘van and aim for a nose weight of about 80 or so kg. and see how things go.   :)

        John.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel my van tows better, sway and bounce, with some load than stripped out to go for a habitation service, even though I make sure the noseweight is always of the right order and close up to the chassis maximum. I suspect as the quoted tyre pressure is for a loaded van?

 

Keeping loads at the extreme ends and particularly those aft of the axle, to a minimum, must raise the critical frequency at which the whole lot sways, so doing that increases the margins for things going wrong.

Fortunately, I tow with a very heavy vehicle so adding weight there, even though again improving stability, is not in our case vital.

 

Whilst not a "payload", using well inflated tow car rear tyres is a positive stability "driver" for optimum sway stability.

 

 

Edited by JTQ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Leedslad said:

  This is my opinion too, so over and above the items which Dave has listed we carry in the car, awning and carpet , outdoor chairs and table and some coats, boots and shoes.  I recommend that OP Dave does this, keeping loading low in the ‘van and aim for a nose weight of about 80 or so kg. and see how things go.   :)

        John.

 

 

We were able to increase our MPTLM by 100kg but prefer some things to travel in the car. These included a box of coke, my scotch, milk in a coolbox, tables and chairs and our awning when we used one

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Easy T said:

We were able to increase our MPTLM by 100kg but prefer some things to travel in the car. These included a box of coke, my scotch, milk in a coolbox, tables and chairs and our awning when we used one

 

Depending on how much scotch you need to load into the car in order to meet requirements while away, you may be overloading the car instead of the caravan. :D

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scotch does not weight much but beer does.

We crossed he border to Denmark this summer with the caravan and the car was very heavy after a visit to the border shop near Flensburg!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Lutz said:

 

Depending on how much scotch you need to load into the car in order to meet requirements while away, you may be overloading the car instead of the caravan. :D

Consumption is good. A litre should last 10 days so probably over 200 miles to a litre as we move every 5 days. Rarely more than 4 litres at start out ;) Wish the car had the same consumption.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, had to ask.

How much coke do you get through? Powder or liquid?

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Usually start out with a pack of 30 diet cokes. Tried snorting it but it burns the top of your nose pretty badly

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, stephendutton63 said:

If for example your tow vehicle is large enough to carry everything you want to take, would it be better just just load the car, or are there advantages from a towing perspective to having some weight in the van. 

So long as the towcar is capable of towing a the fully laden caravan  while retaining an acceptable wight ratio, then my advice would always be to load the caravan to just below its MTPLM. Place heavy items over or just ahead of the axle line while maintaining a balance from side to side, and aim for the maximum noseweight, within the limits of the towcar, towbar, and towing hitch. An empty caravan is liable to be more skittish than a laden one, and a very low noseweight is undesirable as a gentle pressure (usually between 75kgs and 100kgs) on the towball is needed for stability.. 

Caravan_Loading.jpg

I suggest that someone new to towing should select a towcar whose unladen weight exceeds the possible laden weight of the caravan, as that way any load placed in the towcar can only improve the weight ratio, although those experienced at towing may choose to legally tow heavier trailers (within the limits of the towcar) there is a general recommendation (not legally binding) that the inexperienced should not tow a trailer exceeding 85% of the towcar weight.

 

In general terms we always loaded our caravans in a manner that they could be immediately used once on site, thus all clothes, food etc., were in the appropriate cupboards, with only the water carriers possibly having to be temporarily removed to use the caravan whilst en route to the site. Heavier items, such as an awning usually travelled in or on the towcar, along with bulky items like sun loungers.

 

I hope this is some help but further advice can be found on the main website. 

https://www.caravantalk.co.uk/caravan-advice/new-to-caravanning/top-tips-for-new-caravaners

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The trouble now with these low payloads is you can't leave items where they should be because you have so little weight to balance out the caravan ? We often get members on here that have to move their gas bottles from the front gas locker to the rear bathroom to obtain a legal nose weight.

 

 

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thankfully not a problem I have had Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, CommanderDave said:

The trouble now with these low payloads is you can't leave items where they should be because you have so little weight to balance out the caravan ? We often get members on here that have to move their gas bottles from the front gas locker to the rear bathroom to obtain a legal nose weight.

 

 

 

Dave

 

Unless I've overlooked something in UK Legislation there is no such thing as a legal noseweight. The manufacturers must document a noseweight limit of at least 4% of the max. towload or 25kg, whichever is the greater, but to my knowledge it's not a legal requirement for the user to stay within that limit. Exceeding it only affects the manufacturer's product liability and warranty coverage, but it's not an offence as such.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://arbtalk.co.uk/articles.html/articles/the-laymans-guide-to-towing-in-the-uk-r17/

 

 There are a lot of things  that come into play with towing a caravan, the axle weight and also the tyres, then there is what the weight that the tow bar and car can tow , that's before you get to the licence to tow. In the above link, you may find some answers . 

 

Edited by joanie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Lutz said:

 

Unless I've overlooked something in UK Legislation there is no such thing as a legal noseweight. The manufacturers must document a noseweight limit of at least 4% of the max. towload or 25kg, whichever is the greater, but to my knowledge it's not a legal requirement for the user to stay within that limit. Exceeding it only affects the manufacturer's product liability and warranty coverage, but it's not an offence as such.

 

It's a legal requirement not to exceed the maximum down force plated or nose weight on a towbar and as said member find they need to move gas cylinders in some caravans to the rear bathroom to back load to reach this .

 

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, CommanderDave said:

 

It's a legal requirement not to exceed the maximum down force plated or nose weight on a towbar and as said member find they need to move gas cylinders in some caravans to the rear bathroom to back load to reach this .

 

 

Dave

 

Which legal requirement is it then? Please reference it. I can't find it anywhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Surely isn't the noseweight limit another advisory one, like the car's towing limit and the 85%/100% towing ratio recommendation? There is no law that you break by exceeding them. The legal limits are the van's MTPLM, the cars Gross Vehicle Weight and Gross Train Weight. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the OP is still reading, and you asked a very important question, you will have realised that it is important to check the  noseweight with either a noseweight gauge or bathroom scales and a piece of wood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...