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BOAC

Crimp spade terminals

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No one is forced to read this thread.  There's always someone who comes along and whines.

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A now retired Auto-electrician friend of mine used to specialise in wiring Rally cars. Whenever he needed assistance, due to arthritis, he  would call me in to operate a similar Battery Terminal crimping tool. :o

With experience gained from working with him on building wiring looms somewhere at the bottom of my toolbox I expect to find my, unused for many years  Snap-on Wire cutting & crimping tool.

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Some may think that this suggestion is a load of Chinese rubbish.  But to be honest, that is where most of our goods come from.

 

WISH

 

I have bought a lot from this store, yes you may have to wait 6 weeks for delivery, but the quality has been fine, this includes crimp spade terminals.  I bought 50 male and 50 female insulated.  And they are absolutely fine.  Probably cost me less than £3.00 with delivery.  The descriptions can be very difficult to follow and often need deciphering.  Some of the products they sell are weird.  I have not used then for purchases exceeding £10, just in case.  Grand Son in law just bought a pair of earbuds for about £10.  He did a YouTube review and compared them to the Apple original at £100+.  and they came out as nearly as good, Just down a little on sound quality.   I have just paid £2.00 for a superb iPhone 7+ case.  Ridiculously cheap.

 

Don't knock it till you have tried it.  So far they have been very reliable.

 

John

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32 minutes ago, DeeTee said:

 

Snap-on make premium tools IMO. The only snag with these is that they are not ratchet. I have never been taught about non ratchet types, how do you know when to stop squeezing the handles? (Oh no. Here I go again :D)

 

It is possible to over and under crimp and I think that the ratchet types accomplish the near perfect crimp more effectively than non ratchet types. 

 

Any advice please?

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3 minutes ago, BOAC said:

 

Snap-on make premium tools IMO. The only snag with these is that they are not ratchet. I have never been taught about non ratchet types, how do you know when to stop squeezing the handles? (Oh no. Here I go again :D)

 

It is possible to over and under crimp and I think that the ratchet types accomplish the near perfect crimp more effectively than non ratchet types. 

 

Any advice please?

Same as with ratchets, they only close so far and that’s it, does not matter how hard you squeeze they will not go further.

 

John

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Thanks John. THAT simple eh? So which is the best tool for a beginner disregarding price,  in everyone's opinion?

 

Vote a LIKE for rachet or a  :Plus1:  for non ratchet please.

 

 

Edited by BOAC
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You're just fishing for 'likes' !!!

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4 hours ago, Gordon said:

Laugh if you wish but it is better to be over simplistic at times when some DIYers take on tasks that are clearly beyond their knowledge.

An example of a little knowledge being a dangerous thing is shown below. 

image.png

Ridiculous how dangerous that is, no top to the plug leaving live terminals exposed, crazy.

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8 minutes ago, JCloughie said:

Same as with ratchets, they only close so far and that’s it, does not matter how hard you squeeze they will not go further.

I think not.  Ratchets release at a point - and that point depends on the cogged tooth setting on the mechanism.  So ratchets can be made to crimp 'looser' - or 'tighter'  + within a tolerance (and to make up for wear on the head over time, I guess?).  They also have a quick release lever to open the jaws in the event that you can't compress enough to  actuate the auto-release (wrong crimp in wrong slot typically).

 

Manuals usually will only go so far but it's not always easy to be sure you have reached that point on some larger crimps, and also depends greatly on the quality of the tool.  Sometimes the arms can deflect rather than compress the item in the jaws!  

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5 hours ago, Mr Plodd said:

Three long pages all about crimping wires! 

 

And people wonder why a segment of the public label  (some) caravaners as “anoraks” ;)

 

Andy

Move on now, nothing to see here. :D

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For all tools , connectors and items of this ilk I suggest RS Components  https://uk.rs-online.com/web/

 

They used to be business accounts only for the trade but you can now buy online or at their stores.

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8 minutes ago, Dave Capiro owner said:

For all tools , connectors and items of this ilk I suggest RS Components  https://uk.rs-online.com/web/

 

They used to be business accounts only for the trade but you can now buy online or at their stores.

They are excellent and offer free delivery but their crimp tools are over priced.

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3 hours ago, Rodders53 said:

I think not.  Ratchets release at a point - and that point depends on the cogged tooth setting on the mechanism.  So ratchets can be made to crimp 'looser' - or 'tighter'


Not mine for certain, perhaps with higher quality ones. No settings on mine.  Either way, my point that they can’t be overdone by squeezing harder still stands.

 

John

Edited by JCloughie

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6 minutes ago, JCloughie said:

Not mine for certain, perhaps with higher quality ones.

 

John

Release was wrong word.  They stop closing, click, and then releasing pressure on the handles allows the jaws to open.  Up to that point you can release the handles and the jaws stay put.

 

As one of my Managers often remarked "publish and be pulled up on the mistakes you missed while proof-reading". 

Edited by Rodders53

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1 minute ago, Rodders53 said:

Release was wrong word.  They stop closing, click, and then releasing pressure on the handles allows the jaws to open.  Up to that point you can release the handles and the jaws stay put.


Still sounds posh compared to mine.  With mine, crimp, then manually release with the release lever.  No adjustment.

 

John

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2 minutes ago, JCloughie said:

Still sounds posh compared to mine.  With mine, crimp, then manually release with the release lever.  No adjustment.

Then they aren't ratchet crimpers. 

The ones you linked to back on page 1 are manual and have no release lever other than the same handles you close.  They make poor crimps in my experience, even in the best hands.

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30 minutes ago, Rodders53 said:

Then they aren't ratchet crimpers. 

The ones you linked to back on page 1 are manual and have no release lever other than the same handles you close.  They make poor crimps in my experience, even in the best hands.


I never suggested either of those links were ratchet.  The first was a joke for anyone who wanted to pay $950 dollars for a pair!!   The second to show the very cheap rubbish that I had.  
 

I also have a ratchet set but not for standard sized ends. Mine is modelling size, works fine but not like you describe, however they do ratchet, 

 

If I dig them out I will take a picture of them.  
 

image.thumb.jpg.1f0913cf91e10a20779c6c4550dec16d.jpg


Here they are, and I stand corrected, they are adjustable and they do release automatically after use. Posher than I though, think they cost about £8.

 

But still can’t oversqueeze them.

 

John

Edited by JCloughie

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13 hours ago, Gordon said:

Laugh if you wish but it is better to be over simplistic at times when some DIYers take on tasks that are clearly beyond their knowledge.

An example of a little knowledge being a dangerous thing is shown below. 

image.png


Oh I think that’s quite safe compared with these!

C4A9A016-B574-4E33-9DFA-131A961F6081.jpeg

BFB97252-82F8-4BAF-9DAC-42FAF32A0A14.jpeg

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I am cringing but chuckling. 350 amp audio visual. :D

 

1500 Slow blow - even better. Good one Steve.

 

I notice, however, there is no 5 amp illustrated. Any suggestions please?

Edited by BOAC

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9 hours ago, BOAC said:

I am cringing but chuckling. 350 amp audio visual. :D

I notice, however, there is no 5 amp illustrated. Any suggestions please?

You could always go mad and do the job correctly :blink:

 

image.png

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On a side note, I was testing some eBay 15A and 20A fuses which were sized to fit a UK 13A plug.  I wanted to see if they would contain a rupture.  I used a car battery and the initial current could have been many tens of amps.  They both handled this without exploding.  (I took precautions and did this outside).  At 15A, they both got hotter than a proper 13A fuse!

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