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Crimp spade terminals

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I have a ratchet crimping tool with three colours on the handle to indicate which colour crimp should be inserted in order to crimp it.

 

I have two crimp sets. The yellow terminals in each set are the same dimensions but one terminal is bright metal whereas the other has a matt finish. Both terminals have a formed hole where the curves meet at the top of the hole.

 

On crimping a wire on the smooth terminal the wire is pulled from the terminal quite easily, whereas the wire on the matt coloured terminal will not part and the wire breaks on pulling it.

 

So, I deduce that there good quality crimps and not so good ones. Please can anyone recommend a make of crimps that actually crimp and why do the bright smooth crimps fail.

 

Thanks

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You have partially answered your own question by your comment about quality.

I would guess that the smooth fittings are actually made of thinner gauge metal.

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As Stevan said, probably metal thickness which results in the wire not deforming during compressing the crimp. Try adding more wire into the terminal before crimping.

For real high quality crimp lugs look for Ampliversal great crimps, funnel entry etc.

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Posted (edited)

I always used to solder mine after crimping.

 A practice carried over from years spent working in a telephone exchange!

 

Vin Blanc   

Edited by Vin Blanc
typo
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3 minutes ago, Vin Blanc said:

I always used to solder mine after crimping.

 A practice carried over from years working in a telephone exchange!

 

Vin Blanc   

Ok in a static situation but not automotive the soldered crimped joint more likely to. fail at the soldered part. Selecting the correct size terminal is important.  

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35 minutes ago, Vin Blanc said:

I always used to solder mine after crimping.

 A practice carried over from years spent working in a telephone exchange!

 

Vin Blanc   

I too would have suggested adding a little solder. Try not to let it run up the wire as this can make it brittle and break where the solder stops. Just solder at the end of the wire.

 

macafee2

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1 hour ago, Tuningdrew said:

Ok in a static situation but not automotive the soldered crimped joint more likely to. fail at the soldered part.

 

This is often said but in over 50 years of soldering motorcycle (and other) connectors I have yet to have one fail in this way. You do of course have to solder properly, not just "stick" the bits together, and be careful not to overheat and let the solder run up the cable. I believe soldered joints to be superior in every application I've used.

 

In my view, crimps were introduced to deskill the wiring process as any idiot can make a serviceable job given the right kit whereas soldering needs a modicum of skill.

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31 minutes ago, iansoady said:

In my view, crimps were introduced to deskill the wiring process

I think the change was due to speed of operation

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I don’t trust the crimping tool.  But that’s because I have cheap ones as I hardly ever use them.  So I just finish them off with pliers, does the job.

 

John

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Do you really want to be soldering a crimp with a plastic coat? The main thing with crimps is to get the correct size for the wire used. If done correctly you should have no problems.  Is it possible that your two yellows were slightly different sizes. I have in the past used the next size down (crimping tool)when i suspected there could be  an issue.

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1 hour ago, iansoady said:

In my view, crimps were introduced to deskill the wiring process as any idiot can make a serviceable job given the right kit whereas soldering needs a modicum of skill.

Wrong on both counts, a crimped joint is a lot more reliable than soldered joints, thats why the likes of boeing, airbus and all other aircraft manufacturers use them.

47 minutes ago, Easy T said:

I think the change was due to speed of operation

The main reason is reliability.

 

34 minutes ago, JCloughie said:

I don’t trust the crimping tool.  But that’s because I have cheap ones as I hardly ever use them.  So I just finish them off with pliers, does the job.

 

John

Oh dear John, thats not the way to go, buy a decent ratchet crimp and enjoy absolute reliabilty and ease of operation.

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5 hours ago, AJGalaxy2012 said:

 

For real high quality crimp lugs look for Ampliversal great crimps, funnel entry etc.

 

:goodpost::Thankyou:

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3 hours ago, Vin Blanc said:

I always used to solder mine after crimping.

 A practice carried over from years spent working in a telephone exchange!

 

Vin Blanc   

 

 

I too was a telephone engineer and I too used to do that. I had many years experience with soldering, but my  shiny crimps refused to be tinned. The solder just would not adhere which would have been a waste of time crimping and trying to solder.

I am going to go into Halfords for THESE armed with some wire and my crimping tool and try a couple in the shop. Seems the best way rather than trust to luck online.

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39 minutes ago, AJGalaxy2012 said:

Oh dear John, thats not the way to go, buy a decent ratchet crimp and enjoy absolute reliabilty and ease of operation.

 

Just looked on Amazon and seems you can now get some decent ones for a reasonable price, but those are not one of them.

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Ampliversal-476399-TE-Connectivity-AMP-Crimping-Tool/183036943802?hash=item2a9dda1dba:g:M8AAAOSwZrhaamAr

 

Strangely, these look like my cheapo ones.

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Ampliversal-Wire-Cutter/113871397163?hash=item1a8343a12b:g:rfYAAOSwKs1daO-B

 

I will invest when I put more than 3 per year on.

 

John

 

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3 hours ago, Tuningdrew said:

Ok in a static situation but not automotive the soldered crimped joint more likely to. fail at the soldered part. Selecting the correct size terminal is important.  

 

 

I have experienced this failure in a car at the root of the soldered joint either through handling after the joint has been soldered and/or vibration but that is hardly likely to happen in a caravan. All the same, I would far rather leave the soldering and just have the crimp. 

6 minutes ago, JCloughie said:

 

Just looked on Amazon and seems you can now get some decent ones for a reasonable price, but those are not one of them.

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Ampliversal-476399-TE-Connectivity-AMP-Crimping-Tool/183036943802?hash=item2a9dda1dba:g:M8AAAOSwZrhaamAr

 

 

 

I will invest when I put more than 3 per year on.

 

John

 

 

 

Thanks John.

 

Have ordered a couple :D THATS some price.

 

However, when I want to do a job I really hate not having the tools to do it. I don't want to calculate the cost of the tools I do have and that I only use three or four times a year. However, when I need a tool its good to know I can do the job properly rather than trying to bodge it.

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22 minutes ago, BOAC said:

 

 

I have experienced this failure in a car at the root of the soldered joint either through handling after the joint has been soldered and/or vibration but that is hardly likely to happen in a caravan. All the same, I would far rather leave the soldering and just have the crimp. 

 

 

Thanks John.

 

Have ordered a couple :D THATS some price.

 

However, when I want to do a job I really hate not having the tools to do it. I don't want to calculate the cost of the tools I do have and that I only use three or four times a year. However, when I need a tool its good to know I can do the job properly rather than trying to bodge it.

forget the cost, think of the fun.

I've bought tools just for one job and then gone on to use them for other jobs . Most expensive, a shot blaster as I needed a new mains power lead to the garage and a compressor as well as cabling within the garage, air line hose and grit. Fun Fun Fun

 

 

macafee2

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14 hours ago, BOAC said:

I have a ratchet crimping tool with three colours on the handle to indicate which colour crimp should be inserted in order to crimp it.

 

I have two crimp sets. The yellow terminals in each set are the same dimensions but one terminal is bright metal whereas the other has a matt finish. Both terminals have a formed hole where the curves meet at the top of the hole.

 

On crimping a wire on the smooth terminal the wire is pulled from the terminal quite easily, whereas the wire on the matt coloured terminal will not part and the wire breaks on pulling it.

 

So, I deduce that there good quality crimps and not so good ones. Please can anyone recommend a make of crimps that actually crimp and why do the bright smooth crimps fail.

 

Thanks

 

Sounds like you are using the wrong crimping tool, there are type for insulated spades and uninsulated.

Soldering joints is a thing of the past in the electrical contracting industry in my experience.

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1 hour ago, JCloughie said:

 

Just looked on Amazon and seems you can now get some decent ones for a reasonable price, but those are not one of them.

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Ampliversal-476399-TE-Connectivity-AMP-Crimping-Tool/183036943802?hash=item2a9dda1dba:g:M8AAAOSwZrhaamAr

 

Strangely, these look like my cheapo ones.

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Ampliversal-Wire-Cutter/113871397163?hash=item1a8343a12b:g:rfYAAOSwKs1daO-B

 

I will invest when I put more than 3 per year on.

 

John

 

 

Try something like this, infinitely better than the none ratchet type

 

AJG

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This is my crimping tool

 

133024163_CrimpingtoolCTGIMP.thumb.JPG.336155cc69da3a39b9f978356b0f2b89.JPG

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4 hours ago, iansoady said:

 

In my view, crimps were introduced to deskill the wiring process as any idiot can make a serviceable job given the right kit whereas soldering needs a modicum of skill.

 

Speaking of vehicle wiring brought back old memories from back in the late 60’s when I would get home from work at the GPO in Worcester then drive over to Leominster to spend a few hours modifying and re-wiring a brand new Mk 2 Cortina GT, bringing it up to rally spec to compete in the London to Sydney Marathon Rally.

 

A motor club rallying friend, (Bill Bengry, a brilliant mechanic and garage owner), who, in those days, was also an occasional “Ford” works rally driver, had secured an entry in the “London to Sydney” and was to be the first car away (car No.1) from the televised start in London.

 

Each evening, I (and another club rally friend who assisted me), would work on the car’s electrical system (installing special lights and navigational equipment) whilst Bill Bengry carried out all the necessary mechanical upgrades to improve the speed and performance of this excellent car. 

 

As most international class rally cars were very prone to early exhaust pipe damage, Bill Bengry came up with the ingenious idea of diverting the engine exhaust system from the manifold, up through the left front wing and windscreen pillar and over the roof where the silencer was mounted. 

 

The car eventually finished in 23rd place in Sydney with the exhaust system still intact and no reported faults in my carefully soldered wiring.

 

Oh yes,  those were the days!        :)

 

Vin Blanc

London Sydney Rally. Bill's Car.jpg

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Posted (edited)

When I rewired my boat I used terminals from CPC (the AMP brand, rather than the cheaper pro-electric). They were crimped with a ratchet crimp tool and then finished off with adhesive lined heat shrink tubing. All wiring was done with tinned copper wiring to minimise corrosion. https://cpc.farnell.com/c/cable-leads-connectors/connectors/crimp-terminals-splices/spade-fork-crimp-terminals

 

I never had any problems with wires pulling out but I did use wiring that was close to the max size of the terminal wherever possible to maximise the crimp strength. 

Edited by matelodave
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1 hour ago, BOAC said:

This is my crimping tool

 

133024163_CrimpingtoolCTGIMP.thumb.JPG.336155cc69da3a39b9f978356b0f2b89.JPG

Odd the crimps usually go Red, Blue, Yellow as the size of wire increases not as shown in the photo.  Tool shown has replaceable jaws and I wonder if these are correct for insulated crimps.

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Posted (edited)
18 minutes ago, matelodave said:

 but I did use wiring that was close to the max size of the terminal wherever possible to maximise the crimp strength. 

 

I always made a practice of stripping the wire back to twice the length required to terminate the spade connector, (approx 1cm).

 

I would then twist the copper strands then fold back the wire to double before inserting it into the spade terminal with long nose pliers, a quick dab of soldering flux followed by the hot Iron and a small touch of solder.    Finally slide the insulating sleeve down over the connection. 

Job -  Done!

 

Vin Blanc     

Edited by Vin Blanc
typo
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20 minutes ago, Eirrab said:

Odd the crimps usually go Red, Blue, Yellow as the size of wire increases not as shown in the photo.  Tool shown has replaceable jaws and I wonder if these are correct for insulated crimps.

If you look at the size of the locations in the jaw, the blue is the biggest of the three, really odd.

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Thanks all for your help and advice guys.  I'll see what the bods in Halfords have to say and offer.

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