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Fenester

Changing a wheel

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The tyre valve had split and we had a flat. Just taken a long time to change a wheel mainly due to the issue of getting the spare out of the Alko carrier.  2013 tyres so best to change them I suspect; the spare is on at the moment for static use only as it is an original 2006 tyre. I will wait to spring and buy three new tyres. Don't think just repairing the valve is sensible? However the tyres including the old one look OK no cracking etc but better safe than sorry..... Opinions.....

 

I had to jack up the van to get the wheel out and then the other side to change the wheel. Then replacing the slider was difficult as it got stuck. Certainly taught me that changing a wheel at the side of the road would be a definite no no. On the road - green flag would be the only approach.

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For replacing the valves without taking the tyre of the rim l, I have successfully used one of these to do the 4 on my van.I went to the local tyre shop an 4 new valves  for £4.

Mike

Screenshot_20191004-144314_Amazon Shopping.jpg

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See earlier post on daft things. Changed wheel - which we keep in the boot of the car. Took longer to unpack and repack the boot than it did to change the wheel!

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When we got our new caravan, as a test, I removed the spare from the underneath carrier and found it difficult so never put it back there. In storage it is kept in the bathroom, when towing it is put on the floor at the front to help get the nose weight up, on site it is put in the car boot. Previous caravan it went in the front locker. I have seen pictures on here of the spare wheel kept in a purpose designed cellar in possibly Coachman caravans.

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The best trailer we had for an under unit wheel carrier were on the Conway/Pennine folding campers.  We had a slow puncture when in France.  We were heading back to St Omer from Dieppe (2 hour driving).  We got as far as Amien, and found we would be early arriving at the campsite, even though we were taking it easy, and decided to stop at an aire.  We pulled up, got the winder out, went to the back of the trailer, and wound the spare down, dragged the tyre out, then wound the side of the unit with the puncture up, changed tyres, put the flat on the spare carrier, wound it back up, and voila, done.  I did notice that a caravan had pulled up, just as we had started, and they came across when we'd finished, which took 20 minutes, and were amazed how easy it all was.  So why can't caravans have the same carrier system as the folding campers.  Would make so much less work to do it.  I have seen in the past about how people really hate and find it difficult to remove and replace wheels from the carriers on caravans

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53 minutes ago, Paul1957 said:

I have seen pictures on here of the spare wheel kept in a purpose designed cellar in possibly Coachman caravans.

And Avondale Caravans

12 minutes ago, Babstreefern said:

I have seen in the past about how people really hate and find it difficult to remove and replace wheels from the carriers on caravans

I took the al-ko spare wheel carrier off my caravan and put the spare under the fixed bed inside  in exactly the same position to keep the weight balance the same. If I was you I would always carry my side to side leveling  ramp just run the caravan onto them and and its easier to get the jack in place. 

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Only having a bottle jack slowed things up too.

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On the Geist caravan that we have now the spare wheel is in the front locker where there is a fitting to hold it in place.

Before the Geist we had an Avondale to get to the spare wheel you rolled back the carpet and lifted a section of floor directly above the axle and there was the spare wheel and jack, excellent.

Alan

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1 minute ago, AlanNancy said:

Avondale to get to the spare wheel you rolled back the carpet and lifted a section of floor directly above the axle and there was the spare wheel and jack, excellent.

I looked at doing this with my present caravan but trying to find the tyre well was nigh on impossible so just settled for the under bed option.

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Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, AlanNancy said:

On the Geist caravan that we have now the spare wheel is in the front locker where there is a fitting to hold it in place.

Before the Geist we had an Avondale to get to the spare wheel you rolled back the carpet and lifted a section of floor directly above the axle and there was the spare wheel and jack, excellent.

Alan

Avondale .....That was a good solution as was the gas locker in the centre and the glass fibre roof moulding.

 

 

 

Is  a split tyre valve that common?

Edited by Fenester
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4 minutes ago, Fenester said:

Is  a split tyre valve that common?

I would'nt say so,, possibly a lazy tyre fitter put new tyres on and did'nt change the valves

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Organman said:

I looked at doing this with my present caravan but trying to find the tyre well was nigh on impossible so just settled for the under bed option.

 I was looking to "do" the Avondale spare wheel thing to my 'van. I was going to use the spare wheel well from a scrap car boot, however on closer inspection I felt that the 'van floor would not have been strong enough to take the weight. :(

Edited by Flat_at

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6 hours ago, Paul1957 said:

When we got our new caravan, as a test, I removed the spare from the underneath carrier and found it difficult so never put it back there. In storage it is kept in the bathroom, when towing it is put on the floor at the front to help get the nose weight up, on site it is put in the car boot. Previous caravan it went in the front locker. I have seen pictures on here of the spare wheel kept in a purpose designed cellar in possibly Coachman caravans.

Like Paul1957 the first  thing I did when we got our Lunar Clubman was to remove the Alko spare wheel rack (had to jack up the nearside of the van in order to get enough clearance to do that) and put the spare wheel under the bed - I was tempted to take the rack to the dump but it does make a decent shelf in the shed.

 

Can you imagine having to change the off side wheel in the middle of nowhere, in the rain, in the dark and the first thing you would have to do is to get the spare out of that bl***y rack by jacking up the nearside - no way!

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16 hours ago, Fenester said:

........Is  a split tyre valve that common?

 

Don't know about a common problem but I had two split last year where the valves exited the rims.

 

Might have been caused by me messing about with TyrePals.

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The Alko spare wheel carrier is possibly the worst engineering solution known to man. .. Avondale Caravans had the best solution.  My advice is to remove the spare wheel and Alko carrier, chuck the carrier away and store the spare wheel either in the van or in the car boot when travelling. 

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Got the dealer to remove the Alko wheel carrier from our new caravan, it's chained to the fence at our place of storage, did the same with our previous BPW carrier.

 

Wheel travels inside the caravan or car.

 

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Why throw the carrier away?

Best to hold onto it and put it back on the van when selling or part exchanging.

No comeback from Dealer then for a missing original fitting.

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On 04/10/2019 at 14:38, Fenester said:

Don't think just repairing the valve is sensible? However the tyres including the old one look OK no cracking etc but better safe than sorry..... Opinions.....

Replace tyre and valve . . .

 

On 04/10/2019 at 14:38, Fenester said:

I had to jack up the van to get the wheel out and then the other side to change the wheel. Then replacing the slider was difficult as it got stuck. Certainly taught me that changing a wheel at the side of the road would be a definite no no. On the road - green flag would be the only approach.

Al-Ko spare wheel carrier has a poor reputation for being inconvenient to use - however if frequently exercised, the sliders kept well greased and the tyre placed on a disc of thin metal or wood to spread the load and avoid tyre wall damage, then the carries can be considered (just) serviceable.

 

On 05/10/2019 at 10:02, bessacarr425 said:

The Alko spare wheel carrier is possibly the worst engineering solution known to man. .. Avondale Caravans had the best solution.  My advice is to remove the spare wheel and Alko carrier, chuck the carrier away and store the spare wheel either in the van or in the car boot when travelling. 

I tend to agree but unless weight is a major issue for the small weight saving  (7 to 9 kgs depending upon fitments) I would probably leave the carrier in place (empty) and secure the spare wheel within the car or caravan.

 

On 04/10/2019 at 20:37, Flat_at said:

 I was looking to "do" the Avondale spare wheel thing to my 'van. I was going to use the spare wheel well from a scrap car boot, however on closer inspection I felt that the 'van floor would not have been strong enough to take the weight. :(

It almost certainly would have been fine providing a light weight timber surround to the hole was employed, as when positioned behind the axle line most of the tyre weight would be taken directly by the rear chassis rails.

 

 

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The Avondale spare wheel well was a plastic moulding. With a lift off lid a bit like a manhole cover. Always seemed a good idea. You could feel the frame through the loose carpets if you were barefoot. 

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If the manufacturer produced the caravan with a round molded plastic dish in the floor between the chassis rails, it could have an insulated lid made from the removed disc. This would create a floor with no significant loss of stiffness or torsional strength. Just like the Avondale idea but better. With loose fit carpets you wouldn't even know it was there. It would be lighter and cost no more than the Al-Ko contraption.

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2 minutes ago, Ern said:

If the manufacturer produced the caravan with a round molded plastic dish in the floor between the chassis rails, it could have an insulated lid made from the removed disc. This would create a floor with no significant loss of stiffness or torsional strength. Just like the Avondale idea but better. With loose fit carpets you wouldn't even know it was there. It would be lighter and cost no more than the Al-Ko contraption.

But thats what Avondale DID do. 

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27 minutes ago, Ern said:

If the manufacturer produced the caravan with a round molded plastic dish in the floor between the chassis rails, it could have an insulated lid made from the removed disc. This would create a floor with no significant loss of stiffness or torsional strength. Just like the Avondale idea but better. 

Avondale cut a square hole in the floor, reinforced the aperture, and refitted the removed section as a cover for the recessed round plastic wheel carrier. The four corner sections around the round recess then formed the support for the square lid. The initial design included a space below the spare wheel to hold a jack but unfortunately that was found to reduce the ground clearance too much and was reported to catch on some speed humps, consequently this lower recess was removed after the first year. The only Issue I am aware of with the overall concept was that the plastic moulding could deform on the corners over time and so additional support was recommended for the cover lid, by fitting four metal brackets (as shown below) to the aperture corners.

Overall the concept was excellent for keeping the weight down low, the spare wheel clean, dry and readily accessible, and providing somewhere to quickly stow the damaged (and probably dirty) wheel after removal. By placing the hatch inside the caravan, it was not going to be covered by luggage (as it may be in a car's boot) and the recess was supported by the rear chassis immediately behind the axle line.

SpareWheelStowage - Avondale - 1.jpgAvondale spare wheel lid support.jpg

Having owned a number of Avondale caravans that had this system, I fear it was only the "bean counters" that caused it to be discontinued, just before Avondale Coachcraft Ltd., ceased trading. 

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Thought I had better check the nearside tyre  valve  this morning. It is cracked also and whilst fiddling with it it went bang and the other tyre deflated. Goes to show checking tyres at five years old is a must. So off to Micheldever tyres sometime this week - they can check the condition and give advice as to change or just do the valves. Gordon's advice above  is to change them  for new, this  is cautions but reasonable as I will probably have to change them in the next 24 months anyway ...

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I have never been a strong advocate of replacing tyres simply on age alone but in your position I would not want to tow the caravan before replacing tyres and valves. (including the spare).

I had to do the same on a flatbed trailer only last year with tyres that were under five years old, yet the other flatbed is still fine with older tyres and valve stems. All of my trailers are fully serviced and tyres/hitch/lights etc., checked regularly.

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Posted (edited)
19 minutes ago, Gordon said:

I have never been a strong advocate of replacing tyres simply on age alone but in your position I would not want to tow the caravan before replacing tyres and valves. (including the spare).

I had to do the same on a flatbed trailer only last year with tyres that were under five years old, yet the other flatbed is still fine with older tyres and valve stems. All of my trailers are fully serviced and tyres/hitch/lights etc., checked regularly.

The tyres will go in the car and be taken down to Micheldever without the caravan. Do you think the obvious perishing of the valves makes the tyres suspect? May well trade in the van in the spring so hence a little reluctance to fit new tyres.  

 

Edited by Fenester

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