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Gav22

Log burner

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Posted (edited)

I had access to two very large freshly felled trees, which justified me buying a nice Husqvarna petrol chainsaw, but I have a cheap Aldi electric chainsaw for cutting at home, as its much quieter for the neighbours.

 

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Edited by LeadFarmer

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Posted (edited)

Yes I had the same - access to a ginormous tree which I cut up with a borrowed petrol chain saw. I've got an ALDI electric which is suprisingly good as well as a Stilh electric.

 

I've managed several years on free tree and other random wood but I had to buy it both last year and this year and its getting expensive. Unfortunately I don't  have enough storage space for a decent amount without it taking over the garden.

 

Our woodburner was supposed to be a back-up to our air source heat pump but SWMBO likes it too much so it gets lit most evenings in the winter but I do limit it to after 6pm:rolleyes: otherwise she'd have it flogging away all day

Edited by matelodave

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I have a very old apple tree in my back garden.   It was old when I moved in in 1970.:D   It hasn't borne fruit for several years and I planned to get rid of it.   Quote for dropping it is £200 - but thought I could do it DIY for around £60 for an electric saw.   Trouble is I read conflicting advice regarding using chainsaws when the operator has a fitted pacemaker.   Sadly, I haven't been able to do any electric welding since I had one fitted.

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An electric chainsaw has a bog standard electric motor in it, so unless you've had warnings about using electric drills, hair dryers or even standing a bit close to the washing machine I shouldn't think there's much of a problem. The main hazard is cutting yourself if you aren't everso careful.

 

I'd guess that a pacemaker is more likely to be affected by close proximity to a mobile phone or wifi router than it is my an electric motor.

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As I said - there's conflicting advice.   Here's one:-

 

7. Understanding EMI Compatibility

Many people believe home appliances like microwave ovens interfere with pacemakers. This is a myth and should not cause alarm. However, some types of equipment will cause EMI. Electric arc welders and chainsaws are on the list of equipment to avoid — they do not damage pacemakers, but there is a possibility that they may interfere with the proper operation of your device. Most pacemakers have built-in protections from EMI from household appliances like blenders, air purifiers, hairdryers, electric can openers, electric razors, remote controls, televisions, and fax machines. While portable mp3 players are safe, earbuds must stay at least six inches away from a pacemaker. Keep at least 12 inches away from lawnmowers, snowblowers, and stereo speakers. Arc welders and CB or police radio antennas should be 24 inches away. Avoid stun guns, jackhammers, and electronic body-fat measuring scales altogether. If you experience symptoms such as dizziness and palpitations when close to electrical devices, simply move further away, at least two feet. Your pacemaker should then operate properly.

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42 minutes ago, Jaydug said:

Trouble is I read conflicting advice regarding using chainsaws when the operator has a fitted pacemaker.

Ask your Hospital, rather than random strangers from the internet!

 

Google found me a pdf booklet from the Royal Free Hospital, London who advise power tool motors are to be kept at least 6 inches from the implanted device.

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1 hour ago, Jaydug said:

I have a very old apple tree in my back garden.   It was old when I moved in in 1970.:D   It hasn't borne fruit for several years and I planned to get rid of it.   Quote for dropping it is £200 - but thought I could do it DIY for around £60 for an electric saw.   Trouble is I read conflicting advice regarding using chainsaws when the operator has a fitted pacemaker.   Sadly, I haven't been able to do any electric welding since I had one fitted.

 

Dont fell it, spend that money on someone who can prune it properly to promote fruiting. Or plant another apple tree nearby as they need this for pollinating/fertilising. 

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Hi

We have a piece of land and have lived here for  years in a static.(smallholding)

We originally put a log burner in the first static we had. (This is number two).It was one of the reasons we got rid of it. 

Log burners need air to burn. Which means if your insulated enough to keep warm ..Co2 and it going out ,is going to be a problem. If you do leave enough air vents etc, then you end up freezing as soon as it goes out. Insulation needs to be well away from the flu and again this causes a cold bridge when it goes out. If you can manage to keep it alight it drys the van out  in places and contributes to mold elsewhere.

I would go for the wall for the flue if you must install , I can't see why the bend would be too problematic, because as the roof is designed to move slightly it is more prone to leakage around the flu when it gets hot.

As I wanted a constant temperature, we sealed mostt vents and went for a laser inverter  (Zibro) Best method we have tried...and we've tried them all! Heats up really really  quick and cheap as chips to run in a static.  Wouldn't go back to a log burner, caused me nothing but headaches, cold feet and several rows with my wife about who cleans, fills or gets up when its gone out.. Toastie warm now!

 

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Posted (edited)

Can someone explain what a “Laser inverter” is please (a link would be nice) , Google comes up with laser printers and 12v inverters but nothing to do with heating! 

 

Andy

Edited by Mr Plodd

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Posted (edited)

This is what I think it is - a paraffin heater

 

I've not seen paraffin about for years though.  Esso Blue - Pink, Regent Super Green

 

 

https://www.qlima.com/product-media/6852/Product Sheet/ps_uk_SRE5035C-2.pdf?index=0

Edited by Wunny
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Thanks, why has it been referred to as a “Laser Inverter” though?

 

Andy

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Posted (edited)

Maybe it's just a name to make it look more complicated than it is.

 

A seller with a bit more info

 

Years ago the old paraffin heaters produced shed loads of water vapour which would condense on cold walls and lead to mould growth.

Edited by Wunny

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Interesting that the Zibro heater has this as the very first words of the product overview...

 

Quote

This heater can heat up a volume up to 120m2,

 

... perhaps I am missing something but 120 m² is perfectly meaningless, describing as it does, a two dimensional area rather than a volume.  

 

Two posts, each in a different thread in the Static Caravan forum since joining three hours ago and  both mentioning efficient laser heaters...  some vested interest perhaps?

 

 

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Thanks all for the help and advice. There are a few things that have made me think about the best way to go about this.

I did have concerns about carbon monoxide and even though I’ve fitted 6 vents to the main living area, I know that it can still build up.

I am going to go ahead with the log burner, but if it is causing any issues, I’ll stop using it and look into the paraffin heater. I can always reuse the log burner in the living space above the garage I’m building.

Thanks again.

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You will find trying to burn freshly felled trees just will not work.

And it’s a dangerous practice!

You can speed up the drying process by storing the “green” wood in stacks with a roof of some sort so the air can dry the logs.

Wood is stored in lengths 6 to 8 feet long in piles about 3-4 feet square.

Stored in such a way it should be burnable in 12 weeks.

Trying to burn green wood is asking for trouble.

And so is running the stove closed down overnight.

 Both practices lead to tar from the wood condensing out in the chimney resulting in the high risk of a chimney fire.

You should run the stove at full throttle regularly to clear the chimney of tar-this is especially important when burning wood high in resin ie pine.

On chain saw use THE most important safety item is a tight chain!

Check chain tension every time you refuel at least .

if you can pull the chain over the sprockets easily then it’s to slack!

The chain should stop instantly when the throttle trigger is let go-slack chains run on lethal when the operator is getting tired or is distracted.

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Actually only offering my advice and joined as I  had seen the thread while looking up somthing myself.As I  live in a static  and have done for 9yrs, I think I have the necessary actual experience to comment Building a house in between working, so as I said, I do and have experience of living i n one and trying different methods of heating.

A laser inverter is parraffin. Uses a laser not a wick and burns cleanly..I.e produces little or no liquid like the old versions. The air is also forced out using a fan, so it produces blown heat similar to a fan heater. They have timerss, Co,2 detectors and knock guard facilities built in and are portable, although one heats our whole van and we leave it in the lounge.

Go with the burner as they make a nice feature in the van, you can always try something else, if not providing the heat you need.

Tip....I built under the floor where the fire stood.. blocks and slabs to displace the fires weight. Although the van is designed to take much more than the stove you prob have I found the floor started to warp slightly...wood not metal obviously under my fire, as the floors are chipbord..not sure if it was the heat, constant tread around the fire etc.etc.. Get in in now before its cold ...Best of luck mate.

 

 

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That’s good to know, I didn’t realise it could be ready in such a short time, I was told 12 months before it’s ready to burn.

Its good to here others experiences and considering that you’ve been in it for so long, you must know the most efficient ways of keeping it warm. I am going ahead with the log burner as I have a lot of wood to burn, but if I need it I may have to get the other heater mentioned.

thanks.

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Hi, new to the forum. Didn’t want to make a new thread as my question is related to this one. Just got a static, has DG but no CH. I’ve been given a little wood burner (14” wide by 10” deep) and am a tree surgeon so have plenty of wood to burn. There’s no where in my static to install a wood burner, where the gas fire was is not on a external wall, it’s on a angle in a corner that backs on to the kitchen. I was thinking maybe I could take the lounge door off that leads out side and put a box of sorts, like a metal oil tank in the door opening so the I burner sits in that. I suppose sealing maybe a problem but I could take it off in the spring and put the door back on. It hasn’t got to be a metal box if condensation would be a problem, I could make a timber box. Obviously it would need supporting underneath. I wouldn’t have to drill any holes in the caravan roof if I used this method. Anyone have any ideas? Be a shame to not use a free burner and wood. Thanks 

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4 hours ago, Gav22 said:

That’s good to know, I didn’t realise it could be ready in such a short time, I was told 12 months before it’s ready to burn.

Its good to here others experiences and considering that you’ve been in it for so long, you must know the most efficient ways of keeping it warm. I am going ahead with the log burner as I have a lot of wood to burn, but if I need it I may have to get the other heater mentioned.

thanks.

 

Green drying times are related to getting air flowing through the stack removing the moisture and keeping the rain off the stack.

Foresters just cut the wood into suitable lengths and build stacks roughly two cubic metres in volume they use four retaining logs to hold the stack together.

I used to buy a stack at a time and chain saw them up.

Once I was working in a snow storm after a hard days work light was going and I was tiring chain slackened and I lost concentration lowered the saw with throttle off but the chain running down my trusty professional forestry Husqvarna sliced cleanly through my non steel toe capped boot leaving me looking down at my sock😀

My stove is not much bigger than 14x10 and it heats my 24x14 lounge + 12x 12 dining room no bother stove cost £400.

I made a stove in my poverty stricken youth out of pole transformer 1/4 inch steel 14 inch diameter 18 inches long welded it up with my stick welder.

It was grossly inefficient😀 but a rapid producer of heat.

Wood was free I was fit so volume used was not a problem.

I have passed on my chain saws to my son and now buy a trailer of hardwood logs delivered for £200 the trailer holds three cubic metres.

That lasts a mild winter.

If I wanted to heat the above rooms solely with wood I would need six cubes plus.

Working out the requirement for a static is difficult but I would think three cubes of hardwood would heat two days(weekend) and evenings.

The great thing is you can judge the diminishing  woodpile after a few winter weeks and estimate the usage rate.

Condensation is not a problem with wood burners since they pull air from the room.

Remember sparks!!

You need a fireproof hearth mine is one foot bigger than the stove front and sides and the stove projects six inches into the room.

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On 02/10/2019 at 08:29, ancell said:

You will find trying to burn freshly felled trees just will not work.

And it’s a dangerous practice!

You can speed up the drying process by storing the “green” wood in stacks with a roof of some sort so the air can dry the logs.

Wood is stored in lengths 6 to 8 feet long in piles about 3-4 feet square.

Stored in such a way it should be burnable in 12 weeks.

Trying to burn green wood is asking for trouble.

And so is running the stove closed down overnight.

 Both practices lead to tar from the wood condensing out in the chimney resulting in the high risk of a chimney fire.

You should run the stove at full throttle regularly to clear the chimney of tar-this is especially important when burning wood high in resin ie pine.

On chain saw use THE most important safety item is a tight chain!

Check chain tension every time you refuel at least .

if you can pull the chain over the sprockets easily then it’s to slack!

The chain should stop instantly when the throttle trigger is let go-slack chains run on lethal when the operator is getting tired or is distracted.

 

Some very important things to take into account regarding using chain saws, petrol or electric.

 

1) First and foremost safety equipment / clothing. Yes you may only be using one a couple of times a year and the correct equipment is expensive, but cheaper than a funeral or having to learn to live again after catastrophic injuries.

Even the long  in tooth professionals have accidents.

Not forgetting keeping by-standers out of harms way.

 

2) Learn how to handle and use the saw correctly, including its and your capabilities, as with all things, prevention is better than cure, far better to learn how to prevent the most dangerous, such as kickbacks, knowing where the kickback zone is, what the causes are, than trying to control one, which you probably won't.

 

3) Learn how to take care of your saw, especially how to recognise when it needs sharpening, recognising such as loss of cutting efficiency, it no longer pulls itself through the wood, what the sawdust looks like, the cut uneven etc.

Like many other cutting tools, chisels, knives, etc. there is less chance of accidents with a sharp tool than a blunt one.

 

Learn and practice sharpening the correct way, using the correct dia. files, ensuring the teeth angles are all the same, ( most chains have a witness mark scribed on the top face of the tooth which serves a few purposes, it denotes the correct angle, it determines minimum tooth length and provide a good indication if some teeth are shorter than others ) ensure the rakers are at the correct depth, the teeth are all the same length on both sides, a favourite failing is one where the teeth on one side are shorter, and, or, have different cutting angles to the other, caused by having to file at a less comfortable angle on one side as opposed to the other when the saw is turned for the other side.

 

4) A few tips for longevity,  use good quality chain oil, and engine oil if a petrol engine.

Check and sharpen chains frequently, after every cutting session or so, this should only require a couple of strokes of the file, unless you've hit something in the wood ( nail ) or soil.

At every three or four sharpenings, check the bar to see if it is bent, check for and remove burrs, at the same time flip the bar over, increasing its lifetime.

 

End of the sermon. :rolleyes: :)

 

 

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If you have the space look out for an old greenhouse that nobody wants locally. If you have that in your garden and stack logs in it they dry out very quickly and keep dry.

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1 hour ago, Odd days said:

If you have the space look out for an old greenhouse that nobody wants locally. If you have that in your garden and stack logs in it they dry out very quickly and keep dry.

 

As per my previous post, my firewood has gradually taken over my greenhouse and now I have nowhere to grow plants!

 

35796488695_532d8cab80_o.jpg.9f39a5301b6308f77c594794ce0c705b.jpg

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Just a few points on chain saw use.

Always wear ear defenders as petrol chain saws are VERY noisy.

I push my ear defenders through the handle so they are always to hand.

Always wear wrap around safety specs as there are a lot of bits flying about-wood fragments in the eyelid etc quickly go septic.

Wear warm clothes!

I worked in T shirt and work trousers in sub zero conditions-but-when work stops for tea😀 you need warm clothes that breath having no cash I just wore plenty of layers.

There was no safety gear when I took down dead elms 50 years ago plus I could not afford anything other than specs and ear defenders.

If you can run to safety trousers they might save your life.

NEVER chain saw dirty fallen wood that has been lying for years-it will destroy your £15 chain in seconds-the minute stone particles ruin the case hardened chain.

NEVER attempt to chain saw trees piled on top of each other-leave it to the experts-its very difficult to spot where the pent up energy in the trees is just waiting to be unleashed on you when you cut in the wrong place.

If you cut green wood the resin will blunt your saw in seconds-a wire brush will remove the resin in seconds bringing back the chains cutting capabilities.

You will be using that wire brush often😂😂

Remember big dead trees have hidden dangers-when felling 100 foot plus trees the saw sends vibrations through the tree and branches can break off-guess who is standing below.

Always take some bird food for the robin that turns up.

In my non PC tea break I would just give the robin a bit of my sandwich it always ate every morsel.

Finally get a copy of the chain saw bible Barnacle Parps Chain Saw Guide On flea bay for a fiver!!!

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