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Glengavel

Gas Pains

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I had a small gas leak where the hose connects to the regulator (propane). The spigot, or whatever you call the nozzle that the hose connects to, has some deep-ish scratches, and the paint is flaking off the body of the regulator, so I've decided to replace it. There's no date stamp on the regulator.

 

However, the regulator is marked with a "50mbar" label . There's nothing in the caravan handbook to indicate what the recommended pressure is, and the only appliance with a rating plate is the fridge, which recommends the usual 28 for butane and 30/37 for propane. I did once start up the fridge on gas and it eventually worked (manual piezo ignition) after a long period of cursing and swearing (but I remember that from my youth as being normal :lol:!). The Truma heater will also run on gas. The only thing I really use the gas for is the cooker, and it works fine.

 

I have heard that some 'grey import' vans were set up to run on 50mbar, so is this the case with mine? It's a 2002 Ace Award.

 

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A UK caravan should never have had a 50mB regulator fitted, Even at the van's age I think it had become a Propane/Butane common 30 mB type. Pre that different regulators were used for these two gases. Our 2002 van was 30mB.

 

Pre the adoption of 30mB for both gases as you note it was 28mB for Butane and 37 mB for Propane.

 

It will not be deemed safe to be using 50mB on the lower pressure kit fitted to the van, and I for one would change it ASAP.

 

 

 

 

Edited by JTQ
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2002 caravan = bottle top regulator most probably (as opposed to a bulkhead regulator which were introduced in 2003) = someone has retrofitted the incorrect regulator for the gas services in the caravan.

 

So, what gas / gas bottles do you use?

And can you confirm the regulator fixes to the top of the gas bottle?

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Thank you both for your response.

 

4 hours ago, JTQ said:

A UK caravan should never have had a 50mB regulator fitted, Even at the van's age I think it had become a Propane/Butane common 30 mB type. Pre that different regulators were used for these two gases. Our 2002 van was 30mB.

 

Pre the adoption of 30mB for both gases as you note it was 28mB for Butane and 37 mB for Propane.

 

It will not be deemed safe to be using 50mB on the lower pressure kit fitted to the van, and I for one would change it ASAP.

 

I've got the horrible feeling my dad (whose van it was) might have fitted the propane regulator (he always preferred it to butane) and probably picked one up at a vintage car rally! Although the hose was secured with crimped fittings rather than jubilee clips, which suggests it wasn't him. However, he did have the van regularly serviced up until a few years ago so you'd think it might have been spotted...

 

3 hours ago, Rodders53 said:

2002 caravan = bottle top regulator most probably (as opposed to a bulkhead regulator which were introduced in 2003) = someone has retrofitted the incorrect regulator for the gas services in the caravan.

 

So, what gas / gas bottles do you use?

And can you confirm the regulator fixes to the top of the gas bottle?

 

See my response to JTQ above.

 

It's a screw-in POL fitting, propane bottle.

 

I'm going to follow JTQ's advice (and my own instinct) and fit a 37mbar regulator. And then next time I see my dad I shall ask some questions!

Edited by Glengavel

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for your safety and ours , shouldn't you get a qualified engineer to fix it ?

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Unless you are Gas Safe qualified you are IMO trying to fix something that risks the lives of those sleeping in the caravan. Therefore I would not dream of giving you advice even if I was fully qualified to do so.

Leave it to a professional. 

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34 minutes ago, WispMan said:

Unless you are Gas Safe qualified you are IMO trying to fix something that risks the lives of those sleeping in the caravan. Therefore I would not dream of giving you advice even if I was fully qualified to do so.

Leave it to a professional. 

Really! Employ a Gas Safe qualified person to change a regulator on a gas bottle which the user needs to reconnect when a bottle is empty.   The OP needs another regulator of the appropriate pressure rating and the ability to use a spanner.

 

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4 hours ago, joanie said:

for your safety and ours , shouldn't you get a qualified engineer to fix it ?

 

51 minutes ago, WispMan said:

Unless you are Gas Safe qualified you are IMO trying to fix something that risks the lives of those sleeping in the caravan. Therefore I would not dream of giving you advice even if I was fully qualified to do so.

Leave it to a professional. 

 

 

Come on folks, lets get real here.

 

It is quite within the realms and ability and law for an owner to change a cylinder mounted regulator, and everything should be fine, just check with soapy water that the connection of the gas hose to spigot Is gas tight, just make sure the  hose is fully covering the spigot ridges and use a stainless steel gas jubilee clip (they have a smooth inner surface so that it does not damage the gas hose).

No need to tighten the jubilee clip within an inch of its life, gas tight is tight enough.

 

The only thing that it should be on a caravan is , depending on gas being used, for Propane a 37Mb unit and for Butane a 28Mb unit.

 

50Mb regulators were primarily used on commercial vehicles and some motorhomes, never on touring caravans , even imported ones.

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5 minutes ago, Brecon said:

 

 

 

Come on folks, lets get real here.

 

It is quite within the realms and ability and law for an owner to change a cylinder mounted regulator, and everything should be fine, just check with soapy water that the connection of the gas hose to spigot Is gas tight, just make sure the  hose is fully covering the spigot ridges and use a stainless steel gas jubilee clip (they have a smooth inner surface so that it does not damage the gas hose).

 

If you want to be logical about it, the regulator to hose, low pressure connection is actually more reliable than the metal to metal, high pressure connection between regulator and gas bottle which the customer is expected to use and re-use.

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8 minutes ago, Brecon said:

 

 

 

Come on folks, lets get real here.

 

It is quite within the realms and ability and law for an owner to change a cylinder mounted regulator, and everything should be fine, just check with soapy water that the connection of the gas hose to spigot Is gas tight, just make sure the  hose is fully covering the spigot ridges and use a stainless steel gas jubilee clip (they have a smooth inner surface so that it does not damage the gas hose).

No need to tighten the jubilee clip within an inch of its life, gas tight is tight enough.

 

The only thing that it should be on a caravan is , depending on gas being used, for Propane a 37Mb unit and for Butane a 28Mb unit.

 

50Mb regulators were primarily used on commercial vehicles and some motorhomes, never on touring caravans , even imported ones.

Agree  100%  caravanners, motorhomers and static owners change cylinders every day somewhere. 

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If you go to a Spanish fereteria and pick up a Propane regulator it is very likely to be 50mb and I think the standard Spanish propane regulators are 50mb. Anyway, as others have said we use a 37mb regulator in UK and that is what you will normally get when you buy one here. While you're at it why not replace the hose as that's just as easy with a jubilee clip both ends. Hoses deteriorate too so why not? 

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Ignore those who say you need a Gas Safe fitter!

Just do the joints up and then flood with washing up liquid!

Any bubbles means you have a leak!

 

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Thanks for all the helpful replies.

 

Yes, I'm intending to replace the hose as well.

 

 

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26 minutes ago, PR1 said:

Ignore those who say you need a Gas Safe fitter!

Just do the joints up and then flood with washing up liquid!

Any bubbles means you have a leak!

 

There is no need to "flood" anything !!!!!!

A small amount of washing up liquid is all that is needed, but make sure you clean it all off after as it is corrosive !!!!!!

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I've got a can of leak check foam anyway, which is how I found the original leak.  You could smell it the instant you turned the valve on the cylinder, but couldn't hear any hissing. I'd previously tried soapy water without success but I suspect the mix wasn't right.

 

https://www.arctic-hayes.com/Catalogue/Aerosols-Grease/GAS-LEAK-SPRAY-400ml-PH020

 

It gets everywhere if you're not careful, and you need to wipe it off a bit to see what's happening. It eventually showed a tiny crop of bubbles where the hose joined the regulator.

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