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Tyre Reborn (Route Planning Software)

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For those of you who like me have a basic distrust of ALL satnavs  some great news.

 

For years I used Tyre to Travel to plan routes which I then imported into Basecamp to double check before sending to my Garmin.  (Tyre is also for TomTom but obviously no Basecamp.  I previously had a TomTom which was equally capable but then TomTom "dumbed it down" and removed the Itinerary section!  It was no longer possible to plan a route on Google maps,  create it in Tyre and export as an .itn file to my TomTom). 

 

The "Tyre" method of producing a route is extremely accurate and, with experience, it's easy to place "waypoints" where they force a particular route to be followed.   As a consequence over thousands of miles towing (at least 30,000 or more since using a SatNav and Tyre), mainly in Europe, I have always been taken where I want to go and not down a tiny lane that a SatNav might choose. 

 

(Before those of you who have spent a lot on purchasing a SatNav that allows weight, length etc to be added please don't think this will always steer you away from the ubiquitous lane!  It simply will not.  Very briefly a SatNav follows the map loaded into it.  That map will contain data relevant to bridge heights and other restrictions which, consequently the SatNav will take heed of.  However,  no matter if you have chosen "fastest route" or "shortest route"  ALL Satnavs will route you down lanes if they see no reason why not and that route complies with "fastest" or "shortest" criteria.  ONLY if the lane has a restriction that is on your map will the SatNav avoid it). 

 

Tyre was recently discontinued because Google maps has changed.  You are now required to have an API to use Google maps "commercially" and that is charged for.  HOWEVER, it's free to set up an API AND you will only get charged if you use Google maps over 25,000 times in a day.  Yup - seems silly!  (Please read the information here: https://www.janboersma.nl/gett/news.php   Incidentally I have not been asked to provide any payment details to Google - it's simple and straightforward. 

 

When the original Tyre To Travel was withdrawn it was because an alternative was being promoted.  https://www.myrouteapp.com/support     I moved over to the free version of this some time ago but am not impressed for a number of reasons that I can't quickly outline here.  (If you are really interested then go over to the forums and read what people are saying there).  Maybe if I pay 299.95 Euros for the "Gold" version I would be better satisfied - yes, that is 299.95 Euros. 

 

MyRouteapp is designed to pair with a smartphone but it does produce route files that can be imported into a TomTom or a Garmin.   There's a load of reading on the link above if you're interested. 

 

So in a nutshell the original owner of Tyre To Travel, who wrote the software as a hobby, has split away from MyRouteApp and is now offering an updated fully functional version of Tyre free.  In fact you now get what originally was paid for over and above the basic version for free. 

 

I've planned a few routes in the past couple of says and imported them into my SatNav.  Absolutely no issues.  Life is back to normal. 

 

PS.  Both Tyre and MyRouteApp are aimed at motorcycling but that's irrelevant.  All you want is the ability to plan a route that your SatNav will follow.  

 

I hope those of you who plan routes will find this information useful.  

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17 minutes ago, Squash said:

However,  no matter if you have chosen "fastest route" or "shortest route"  ALL Satnavs will route you down lanes if they see no reason why not and that route complies with "fastest" or "shortest" criteria.  ONLY if the lane has a restriction that is on your map will the SatNav avoid it). 

 

 

That, of course, is not the case for all Satnavs or least is not true for Aguri

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54 minutes ago, SamD said:

 

That, of course, is not the case for all Satnavs or least is not true for Aguri

 

Smiles - I'm not at all sure of you "of course" response.   Since you offer no detail to support the claim I can only presume you're talking from personal experience? 

 

You do surprise me though.  Seriously! How does  Aguri manage to do it  differently?

 

What map system does it use? 

 

How can it know when a lane is de-restricted (in theory faster) than a 40 mph road and therefore not route you down it? 

The ONLY way complete security could possibly be guaranteed is for someone to survey ALL roads and make judgements regarding suitability for towing or motorhome use.  Even that is subjective!  And all this information currently not found as part of any map system be incorporated into a new super map just for Aguri!  

 

Well, in the UK alone there are 262,300 miles of paved roads alone.   Can't imagine how many more in Europe. 

 

Yes, I hear you tell me that you've never been let down.  I believe you of course.  That's not the point.  The point is you could be let down at any time when using any SatNav.

 

I really can't begin to believe that Aguri have travelled every road throughout Europe simply to judge its suitability for camping.   Does Aguri use "Open Street Map", "Google Maps", "Here", "Navteq", "TeleAtlas"  maps?

 

lane.png

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www.ridewithgps.com is good, easy to use, and free for the perfectly adequate base version.

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32 minutes ago, daveat92 said:

www.ridewithgps.com is good, easy to use, and free for the perfectly adequate base version.

 

That's interesting.  A new one for me.  Presume it allows routes to be "drawn" on a map and then exported to .gpx for garmin or, presume, .itn for TomTom?

 

Do you know which base map it uses?  Are the routes planned using a PC and imported to a SatNav or just available for a smart phone application?

 

It's always useful to have more options than one piece of software.

 

 

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We enter the height, width and weights and the TomTom Go Camping takes us down the most suitable roads and avoids those that may be too narrow.  So SamD is correct with his statement.

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1 hour ago, Durbanite said:

We enter the height, width and weights and the TomTom Go Camping takes us down the most suitable roads and avoids those that may be too narrow.  So SamD is correct with his statement.

 

Smiles. Well - now I know!

Maybe you could enlighten me just a little.  

How about explaining just exactly how your TomTom manages so well?  

What's the secret?

How does it and the Aguri work their magic?

 

Surely you can do better than telling us SamD is correct because so far your TomTom has not directed you up a lane? 

 

I'm all ears - do tell. 

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Squash said:

The ONLY way complete security could possibly be guaranteed is for someone to survey ALL roads and make judgements regarding suitability for towing or motorhome use.  Even that is subjective!  And all this information currently not found as part of any map system

 

Ordnance Survey (who seem to be forgotten in navigation discussions these days) distinguish between roads over and under 4m in width, and "Narrow roads with passing places", on their 50,000: maps (Landranger series) and larger scales.  It is also possible to see from those maps how sharp bends are. So in principle the basic information is there; whether or not these satnav companies use it IDK.

 

Height is another matter.  I believe that satnavs base their height decisions only on "official" restrictions such as low railway over-bridges. It is unlikely that they will bother to find out whether roads are prone to low hanging tree branches. Near me is a B road in a forest area along which lorries often clout branches after rain or snow - I have seen lorries brought to a halt by them.

 

OS_map_symbols_roads_paths.jpg

Edited by Bolingbroke
Format
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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Squash said:

For those of you who like me have a basic distrust of ALL satnavs  some great news.

 

For years I used Tyre to Travel to plan routes which I then imported into Basecamp to double check before sending to my Garmin.  (Tyre is also for TomTom but obviously no Basecamp.  I previously had a TomTom which was equally capable but then TomTom "dumbed it down" and removed the Itinerary section!  It was no longer possible to plan a route on Google maps,  create it in Tyre and export as an .itn file to my TomTom). 

 

The "Tyre" method of producing a route is extremely accurate and, with experience, it's easy to place "waypoints" where they force a particular route to be followed.   As a consequence over thousands of miles towing (at least 30,000 or more since using a SatNav and Tyre), mainly in Europe, I have always been taken where I want to go and not down a tiny lane that a SatNav might choose. 

 

(Before those of you who have spent a lot on purchasing a SatNav that allows weight, length etc to be added please don't think this will always steer you away from the ubiquitous lane!  It simply will not.  Very briefly a SatNav follows the map loaded into it.  That map will contain data relevant to bridge heights and other restrictions which, consequently the SatNav will take heed of.  However,  no matter if you have chosen "fastest route" or "shortest route"  ALL Satnavs will route you down lanes if they see no reason why not and that route complies with "fastest" or "shortest" criteria.  ONLY if the lane has a restriction that is on your map will the SatNav avoid it). 

 

Tyre was recently discontinued because Google maps has changed.  You are now required to have an API to use Google maps "commercially" and that is charged for.  HOWEVER, it's free to set up an API AND you will only get charged if you use Google maps over 25,000 times in a day.  Yup - seems silly!  (Please read the information here: https://www.janboersma.nl/gett/news.php   Incidentally I have not been asked to provide any payment details to Google - it's simple and straightforward. 

 

When the original Tyre To Travel was withdrawn it was because an alternative was being promoted.  https://www.myrouteapp.com/support     I moved over to the free version of this some time ago but am not impressed for a number of reasons that I can't quickly outline here.  (If you are really interested then go over to the forums and read what people are saying there).  Maybe if I pay 299.95 Euros for the "Gold" version I would be better satisfied - yes, that is 299.95 Euros. 

 

MyRouteapp is designed to pair with a smartphone but it does produce route files that can be imported into a TomTom or a Garmin.   There's a load of reading on the link above if you're interested. 

 

So in a nutshell the original owner of Tyre To Travel, who wrote the software as a hobby, has split away from MyRouteApp and is now offering an updated fully functional version of Tyre free.  In fact you now get what originally was paid for over and above the basic version for free. 

 

I've planned a few routes in the past couple of says and imported them into my SatNav.  Absolutely no issues.  Life is back to normal. 

 

PS.  Both Tyre and MyRouteApp are aimed at motorcycling but that's irrelevant.  All you want is the ability to plan a route that your SatNav will follow.  

 

I hope those of you who plan routes will find this information useful.  

This sounds good ,but my car has a built in satnav. Can you put the files onto it somehow. It's a Kia which I think uses TomTom software and has a sd card on the dash. Or can it be put onto a smart phone

Thanks

Edited by frazerg
missing question

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28 minutes ago, frazerg said:

This sounds good ,but my car has a built in satnav. Can you put the files onto it somehow. It's a Kia which I think uses TomTom software and has a sd card on the dash. Or can it be put onto a smart phone

Thanks

 

  I honestly don't know but doubt it. I use Garmin now but if your system uses TomTom software and has a CD card then you may be in luck.  I can choose to save my routes on an SD Card with my Garmin - it will read them from there.  You could try by creating a route in TomTom format and pop it on a spare SD card.

 

Good luck.

 

I know I can't use a similar solution on my Hyundai SatNav. 

1 hour ago, Bolingbroke said:

 

Ordnance Survey (who seem to be forgotten in navigation discussions these days) distinguish between roads over and under 4m in width, and "Narrow roads with passing places", on their 50,000: maps (Landranger series) and larger scales.  It is also possible to see from those maps how sharp bends are. So in principle the basic information is there; whether or not these satnav companies use it IDK.

 

Height is another matter.  I believe that satnavs base their height decisions only on "official" restrictions such as low railway over-bridges. It is unlikely that they will bother to find out whether roads are prone to low hanging tree branches. Near me is a B road in a forest area along which lorries often clout branches after rain or snow - I have seen lorries brought to a halt by them.

 

OS_map_symbols_roads_paths.jpg

 

That's right - good point.

But remember France, for example, uses IGN maps and I don't doubt other European countries have their own "brand"  I can't see any SatNav maker pay for the use of all the maps required, combine them into one file/format and ensure the scale etc is suitable.  

I was hoping one of the two disciples of "dedicated SatNavs" might be forthcoming with the maps used.  My Garmin for example used "Here" maps. 

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Just this afternoon I had the satnav in my Santa Fe on because I was curious which route it would choose for a local trip.  

It directed me down a private road that has never been open during the sixty plus years that I've been aware of it.

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1 hour ago, Bolingbroke said:

 

Ordnance Survey (who seem to be forgotten in navigation discussions these days) distinguish between roads over and under 4m in width, and "Narrow roads with passing places", on their 50,000: maps (Landranger series) and larger scales.  It is also possible to see from those maps how sharp bends are. So in principle the basic information is there; whether or not these satnav companies use it IDK.

 

Height is another matter.  I believe that satnavs base their height decisions only on "official" restrictions such as low railway over-bridges. It is unlikely that they will bother to find out whether roads are prone to low hanging tree branches. Near me is a B road in a forest area along which lorries often clout branches after rain or snow - I have seen lorries brought to a halt by them.

 

OS_map_symbols_roads_paths.jpg

 

OS distinguishes "roads GENERALLY under 4m" - so ANY road on an OS map may be less than 4m at certain points, eg a 6'6" wide stone gateway on a road generally wider than 4m.

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7 hours ago, Squash said:

 

Smiles - I'm not at all sure of you "of course" response.   Since you offer no detail to support the claim I can only presume you're talking from personal experience? 

 

You do surprise me though.  Seriously! How does  Aguri manage to do it  differently?

 

 

 

Your posts here are containing some strange terms but that apart I can only base my assertions from personal experience and from what I am told which I believe until proved otherwise!  This from a recent post I made on this site:

 

I had it in writing from Aguri that HERE mapping which they use, includes measurements of road width and certain 'road conditions' these taken from photographs.  Whether they use Google or their own, I know not and, of course, there will be some issues with outdated 'snaps'

 

I have just found the letter from Aguri in response to a question of mine:  Are roads measured?

 

Not measured no, but we 'weight' them and 'penalise' roads that are too narrow or the surface unsuitable. When the maps are compiled - they are videoed - I am sure you have seen Google’s video vans. These videos are then reviewed and the road assigned a massive amount of attributes - it's seriously complex stuff.

The work is done by the company that provides the 'raw' map data. They are called 'Here'. I should also add that this is my language and 'Here' will use different technical terminology to explain how they assign the different attributes to each roads and what those attributes they are. There is though a sophisticated grading system for every section of road. Here supply that data to us and then it is up to us how we interpret and use that data to create routes depending on the attributes the customer enters. This last part is our expertise and what differentiates us from say Garmin and how they might create a route.

 

Just adding my thoughts on this, I suppose given the camera is at a fixed focal length, it will be quite easy to determine the width of every part of the road being photographed.

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5 hours ago, Durbanite said:

We enter the height, width and weights and the TomTom Go Camping takes us down the most suitable roads and avoids those that may be too narrow.  So SamD is correct with his statement.

 

I have been doing the same for a few years and have been very impressed with the TomTom caravan edition.  Both the interface and the routing.  It did let me down once but that was because of a reset it lost my size data.

 

This year it threw a wobbly while in France.  I thought about getting the up to date model but looked for a cheaper alternative.  I invested in a big iPhone 7.  With the intension of installing TomToms two apps.  Go and My Drive.  My Drive allows for planning including vehicle size, way points and scenic routes.  This can then be fed into the Go app which otherwise is used as a straightforward SatNav.  

 

For limited use use these are free, but for full use about £18 per year.  I thought this be a great deal, but then I met a problem.

 

TomTom have competed the link between the apps for Android but not for Apple.  This annoyed me after investing in the Apple phone.  So I looked for alternatives.

 

Michelins app for Apple and Android seem to do the lot, but for me the interface is not as nice as TomTom.

 

I was going to resign myself to Michelin until, I thought I would open the back of the failed TomTom.  I have no idea what I did to it but it now works.  

 

So back to the tried and tested TomTom for now and hope that the Apple app gets finished.  I now have an expensive iPhone.  But also have a very good iPhone SE for sale if anyone is interested.

 

John

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1 hour ago, Black Grouse said:

OS distinguishes "roads GENERALLY under 4m" - so ANY road on an OS map may be less than 4m at certain points, eg a 6'6" wide stone gateway on a road generally wider than 4m.

 

Maybe, but at least you can avoid the ones that are indicated as being less than 4m wide.

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Squash said:

How can it know when a lane is de-restricted (in theory faster) than a 40 mph road and therefore not route you down it? 

 

That illustrates a silly thing about UK speed limits - that narrow single track winding country lanes are mostly unrestricted while an adjacent wider and more open road can be limited. 

 

Another example I am familiar with is pictured below - the main road (a B road) has a 40mph speed limit for its whole length of about 4 miles.  It is an open country road with mostly easy bends and passes only a few scattered houses.  I'm not saying the limit is not justified - it might have had trouble with motorbike speedsters in the past, it's the sort of road they like. What is silly is the fact that the half-dozen bendy single track lanes that turn off it are all carefully marked with de-restriction signs.  As Squash says, a satnav might assume that you could do 60mph along these, when in reality a third of that would be good going for much of them.

 

I would have a simple solution to this anomaly : there should be a blanket default 30mph limit on all roads with no centre line marking.  This would be similar to the existing blanket default limit of 30 mph in towns (strictly speaking roads with street lighting); unless signs indicate a different limit.

 

 

 

2019-8-18_01.png

Edited by Bolingbroke

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Posted (edited)

When Tyre stopped working with my Tomtom I switched to ITN Converter, which is freeware.

It doesn't have Google maps but there are alternatives - I use Michelin Maps.

Easy to enter waypoints and then export to Tomtom Mydrive, check whether you are happy with the route in Mydrive  and then sync with your Tomtom. Michelin maps unfortunately doesn't have street view so you need to go to Google maps to check out any potential dodgy parts of the  route.

It's a lot more fiddly than using Tyre so when I get a chance I will investigate the OP's link.

Edited by onewheelonmywagon

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9 hours ago, SamD said:

 

The work is done by the company that provides the 'raw' map data. They are called 'Here'. I should also add that this is my language and 'Here' will use different technical terminology to explain how they assign the different attributes to each roads and what those attributes they are. There is though a sophisticated grading system for every section of road. Here supply that data to us and then it is up to us how we interpret and use that data to create routes depending on the attributes the customer enters. This last part is our expertise and what differentiates us from say Garmin and how they might create a route.

 

 

That's interesting.  Garmin also use "Here" mapping.   

Years ago I had what was then called something like "major roads of Europe" map in my TomTom.  I presume this was a simplified map that literally only included the major roads.  Whilst I've often wondered if this style of map could work for us  today were it available, it does, of course, beg the question as to how we navigate down the twisty steep lanes that lead to our chosen CL!

We have all driven down roads we would normally avoid because there was no other way to reach a site.  Having done that it's still possible to find entry is impossible without coming from the opposite direction.

With my routing I can see these difficulties and make my own decisions regarding the route. 

I can only presume that your SatNav, which claims to "KNOW" all unsuitable roads, would need to be ignored if you were ever to reach some sites. 

We all have our own views and mine are simply that a SatNav can ONLY avoid situations it KNOWS about.  That means the information is on the map. 

"Here" maps are detailed but I'm positive do not have the necessary detail to preclude all possible "impossible" roads. 

Whist I've never claimed the dedicated Satnavs are a total waste of time I do claim they are not infallible.   One day most users will discover that assertion. 

There are numerous weight restrictions in France for 3.5 tonnes.  Since we often drag the tin box through very "rural" areas it's not uncommon to meet such a restriction.  I may or may not have seen this on Google maps.  If I had planned the route and noticed it then clearly I would have planned to avoid it.  However, if I simply relied upon my Garmin for directions it would have no hesitation in routing me there.  Your SatNav would not. 

That's a very useful example of how the dedicated SatNav can be a help.  But the restriction is signed and will be on the map.  

 

 

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6 hours ago, onewheelonmywagon said:

When Tyre stopped working with my Tomtom I switched to ITN Converter, which is freeware.

It doesn't have Google maps but there are alternatives - I use Michelin Maps.

Easy to enter waypoints and then export to Tomtom Mydrive, check whether you are happy with the route in Mydrive  and then sync with your Tomtom. Michelin maps unfortunately doesn't have street view so you need to go to Google maps to check out any potential dodgy parts of the  route.

It's a lot more fiddly than using Tyre so when I get a chance I will investigate the OP's link.

 

You will not be disappointed.   It's back to the original functionality.    The Google API is nothing to worry about unless you plan to use the mapping a ridiculous number of times every day. 

The only thing I've yet to investigate is the possibility of saving files as new format .gpx or old format .gpx.  This does make a difference with Garmin. 

If you are following a route and there is a diversion then you may miss one or more waypoints.  Garmin will try to get you back to missed points until you are closer to one that is beyond the diversion but on the original route.  This can be confusing. 

If you save your files as the old .gpx format then a menu item will be available on the Garmin allowing you to "ignore" waypoints.  Clearly  all you need to do is ignore the waypoints you are going to miss.

 

Tyre still saves files as .itn and copies to TomTom "Home" so you should have no issues. 

9 hours ago, Bolingbroke said:

 

Maybe, but at least you can avoid the ones that are indicated as being less than 4m wide.

 

That would be useful until you had to use such a road to get to your site!

 

Like you I don't know if OS maps can be used for SatNavs.  As I said earlier my view is they can't.  

Apart from the issues of European and whole world mapping the cost would be enormous.  SatNav manufacturers partner with established map providers and clearly for both Garmin and Aguri that is "Here". 

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9 hours ago, Bolingbroke said:

 

I would have a simple solution to this anomaly : there should be a blanket default 30mph limit on all roads with no centre line marking.  This would be similar to the existing blanket default limit of 30 mph in towns (strictly speaking roads with street lighting); unless signs indicate a different limit.

 

 

 

2019-8-18_01.png

I agree wholeheartedly with you.  In our area a lot of the roads are narrow and have no footpaths.  Many drivers seem to think they have an inherent right to an empty road and have no thought walkers, animals etc.

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1 hour ago, Squash said:

I can only presume that your SatNav, which claims to "KNOW" all unsuitable roads, would need to be ignored if you were ever to reach some sites. 

 

No. The sat nav would still find a route as it contains the full road network. If it's a good system it would flag that part of the route may be unsuitable according to the parameters you have given it.

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8 hours ago, onewheelonmywagon said:

I use Michelin Maps.

Easy to enter waypoints and then export to Tomtom Mydrive, check whether you are happy with the route in Mydrive  and then sync with your Tomtom.

 

Seems convoluted.  Michelin is a good route planner, but MyDrive is equally so.  Both provide caravan routes.  

 

Exporting to TomTom is only possible on newer devices.  To work on my older TomTom I had to build the route manually from MyDrive on the computer screen.  Time consuming, but it did work.  To have the ability to transfer would save a lot of time.  That’s the crucial bit that’s missing from the TomTom app.

 

I am intrigued by the amount of work and ingenuity some put into planning their routes.  While of course no SatNav is infallible the TomTom caravan edition, (older model) I have been using has been excellent and plans caravan routes on the fly.  I have not used it but I believe Garmin also do one and I am told Michelin.  

 

Apps is on phones or Apple play or Google maps are the directing things are going.  But caravan routes on the above are lagging behind.  

 

I heard a rumour that Apple have bought out TomTom so things may change.

 

John 

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10 minutes ago, svimes said:

 

No. The sat nav would still find a route as it contains the full road network. If it's a good system it would flag that part of the route may be unsuitable according to the parameters you have given it.

  2 hours ago, Squash said:

I can only presume that your SatNav, which claims to "KNOW" all unsuitable roads, would need to be ignored if you were ever to reach some sites. 

 

So YES. Not NO.   You would indeed ignore it.  

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16 hours ago, Squash said:

 

Smiles. Well - now I know!

Maybe you could enlighten me just a little.  

How about explaining just exactly how your TomTom manages so well?  

What's the secret?

How does it and the Aguri work their magic?

 

Surely you can do better than telling us SamD is correct because so far your TomTom has not directed you up a lane? 

 

I'm all ears - do tell. 

It is easy as it has an on off button.  First you take your finger, then depress the button until it switches on.  You then select the type of vehicle by using your finger and selecting the appropriate icon and then change from car to car with caravan.  Using your finger again you enter the destination.  Just a matter of not being challenged and using your fingers correctly.  :D

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24 minutes ago, JCloughie said:

 

Seems convoluted.  Michelin is a good route planner, but MyDrive is equally so.  Both provide caravan routes.  

 

Exporting to TomTom is only possible on newer devices.  To work on my older TomTom I had to build the route manually from MyDrive on the computer screen.  Time consuming, but it did work.  To have the ability to transfer would save a lot of time.  That’s the crucial bit that’s missing from the TomTom app.

 

I am intrigued by the amount of work and ingenuity some put into planning their routes.  While of course no SatNav is infallible the TomTom caravan edition, (older model) I have been using has been excellent and plans caravan routes on the fly.  I have not used it but I believe Garmin also do one and I am told Michelin.  

 

Apps is on phones or Apple play or Google maps are the directing things are going.  But caravan routes on the above are lagging behind.  

 

I heard a rumour that Apple have bought out TomTom so things may change.

 

John 

 

There's no end to the trouble some of us go to when planning a camping trip!

To be perfectly honest I enjoy the planning.  I enjoy consulting  Google maps, looking at places to visit, how to get to them.  It's part of the holiday.  I know others feel the same too.

 

The other consideration is reducing stress to as close to zero as possible - basically knowing that a journey will not involve unsuitable roads.  That's why when possible I do plan my routes. 

 

Just to give you an idea the map below (Basecamp) shows the actual routes I've towed the caravan over the last few years. Not once have we met with any difficulty. 

 

 

routes.png

10 minutes ago, Durbanite said:

It is easy as it has an on off button.  First you take your finger, then depress the button until it switches on.  You then select the type of vehicle by using your finger and selecting the appropriate icon and then change from car to car with caravan.  Using your finger again you enter the destination.  Just a matter of not being challenged and using your fingers correctly.  :D

 

 How helpful and enlightening.  :rolleyes:

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