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Charliefarlie

Steadies

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I use a cordless drill to raise and lower my steadies but only enough to get the steadies down and firm, not to lift the caravan.

 

A socket to fit the steady and  extension bar to fit into the drill can be picked up from a car boot sale for £1.50ish if you are not in a hurry.

 

macafee2

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5 hours ago, Borussia 1900 said:

Not unless you’re Dutch 😂😂

 

   You can always tell a Dutchman.  But you can't tell him much!

 

        John.

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8 hours ago, Wunny said:

Of course they may only be steadies, but when you seat, for example 4 x 100kg adults (400kg) at the front end of the van and the jockey wheel is safely tucked up off the ground,

Why on earth would you have the jockey wheel "tucked up off the ground"?

 

The jockey wheel is the third weight bearing point and should be down, not up!

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Either use a spirit level, or keep doors open, ie, wardrobe doors, bathroom doors, even fridge doors.  Then level the caravan so the doors don't either open any further or close, then viola, your caravan is level.  Then put the steadies down.  DO NOT PUT THEM DOWN SO THAT THE CARAVAN IS HELD UP BY THE STEADIES, they are not used for that at all

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If the steadies are only there to steady the van (and I agreed that's exactly what they're for) then, what is the point of Heavy-Duty Steadies?

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8 hours ago, Brecon said:

Why on earth would you have the jockey wheel "tucked up off the ground"?

 

The jockey wheel is the third weight bearing point and should be down, not up!

I always have mine down, sharing the load, but there are others on here who like them up, so I mentioned it, because it's a valid thing to question when discussing steady loading.  Those that do it, will be keeping quiet for the time being!

 

Why they would want them up, I've never  understood, maybe it's a mind set, like closing the blinds whilst traveling - I can't see the point of that either, but that's a different discussion!

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I would have thought the more points of contact with the ground sharing the load the better.

 

I have the AL-KO Premium steadies which I believe have a Max Load of 1250 Kg each, they are bolted to the chassis rails rather than just screwed to the caravan floor, I still only use them as 'steadies' though, never as 'jacks'.

Edited by Borussia 1900
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10 hours ago, Brecon said:

Why on earth would you have the jockey wheel "tucked up off the ground"?

 

The jockey wheel is the third weight bearing point and should be down, not up!

 

Whether the jockey wheel is down or up, the rear steadies still have to be capable of taking the extra weight of, say, 4 adults, when the caravan is pitched, especially on those caravans where the lounge is at the back.

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11 hours ago, Brecon said:

The jockey wheel is the third weight bearing point and should be down, not up!

 

Unless you try to use them as jacks they will never bear the full weight of the caravan, the 4 steadies spread the fulcrum pivoted weight of the caravan and the movement of occupants.

                                                      *********************************************

 

7 hours ago, pepys1660 said:

If the steadies are only there to steady the van (and I agreed that's exactly what they're for) then, what is the point of Heavy-Duty Steadies?

 

The more sturdy they are the less the move about, I have had both and when the heavy duty ones are down (especially if well extended) they move less than the skinny ones as you walk about inside the caravan.

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Our rear ones are attached to the chassis, the front ones just to a thin plate that is attached to the floor.

 

Supports the theory that there's no jockey wheel at the back

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On 21/08/2019 at 14:57, svimes said:

Our rear ones are attached to the chassis, the front ones just to a thin plate that is attached to the floor.

 

 

 

Ours is attached to the chassis at the rear but not fixed to it so it can pivot up from that point and  still exert quite a force on the floor it overtightened. Rear corners are prone to getting wet from rain water not dropping off the bodywork cleanly and there is a good chance of rot establishing over time. The first time it's noticed is when the corner steady rips the floor off of the wooden outer frame.

 

Dave

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On cordless drills, people are far too keen to use power tools for what are really trivial jobs. I often see Youtube videos of people fetching a cordless screwdriver to do up a couple of small screws.  As an engineer it sometimes makes me flinch to watch. It is different in a mass-production factory,where the torque will have been set exactly for the job, and some muppet has thousands of screws to do up every day. It is also different if you have some disability.

 

Winding caravan steadies by hand brace, including feeling when they are fully up or are down to an appropriate moderate pressure, is a trivial job in terms of both time and effort compared with the rest of the "chores" involved in pitching.

Edited by Bolingbroke
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5 hours ago, Bolingbroke said:

On cordless drills, people are far too keen to use power tools for what are really trivial jobs. I often see Youtube videos of people fetching a cordless screwdriver to do up a couple of small screws.  As an engineer it sometimes makes me flinch to watch. It is different in a mass-production factory,where the torque will have been set exactly for the job, and some muppet has thousands of screws to do up every day. It is also different if you have some disability.

 

Winding caravan steadies by hand brace, including feeling when they are fully up or are down to an appropriate moderate pressure, is a trivial job in terms of both time and effort compared with the rest of the "chores" involved in pitching.

my OH did try using the drill once, he bought the bit to go into the drill, charged it up and by the time it took to get it all together he reckons he can do it better and quicker using the brace, plus of course there's less to carry.

Edited by joanie

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30 minutes ago, joanie said:

my OH did try using the drill once, he bought the bit to go into the drill, charged it up and by the time it took to get it all together he reckons he can do it better and quicker using the brace, plus of course there's less to carry.

A little organisation Goes a long way!

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We always used a cheapo electric drill-never disassembled it just left as was in the garage and dumped  in the car footwell or boot. Saves time and effort for swmbo whose job that is(was now we have the EP system)with the torque set really low to avoid damage! Nice and easy, effective and safe. 

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About 20years ago I bought the cheapest of cheap cordless drills. It came in a case with a few screwdriver bits, a few twist drill bits and a charger. The drill has been replaced twice when batteries died and the basic kit has a few additions:-

An adapter for the steadies,

An adapter for screw in awning pegs, 

A modified Allen key for attaching top box to car.

All the items come in handy occasionally!

 

The time it takes to get it out of the front locker and fit the adapter is less than the time it saves on the first steady!

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All hail the cordless drill, especially when it's raining. Anything which brings aperitif time a little nearer is always acceptable. However, I still use the brace to fine-tune the steadies.

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