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BOAC

A cycle ride tale

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I hope you enjoy reading the following. It will help pass the time. Perhaps, if you have thunderstorms like us, it will provide some entertainment instead of looking at sheets of rain falling, although the lightning makes the weather more interesting. The thunder that is accompanying the rain is shaking the windows rather alarmingly. May good fortune be with you who are caravaning and I wish you a leak free time. To say a leak free break as I was going to say, is not really apt.

 

Recently, we had a trip to Calander in Scottyland. The scenery was beautiful and the whole expedition was thoroughly enjoyable, but for one thing which is a sensitive subject to say the least.

 

I and Petal together with her brother John, towing their pooch Daisy who has arthritis in her rear legs, partook a cycle ride around Loch Katrine, along a narrow road that runs from Loch Katrine visitor centre to Stroneachlachar - a mere 12.5 miles. A mere snip of a distance in the great scheme of things - or so I thought.

 

We sallied forth in clear sunny weather at a leisurely pace with Petal and me on our Ebikes and with John, and his wife Alison setting the pace. I pedalled with the power in low setting to conserve the battery.

 

After 4 miles I began to feel somewhat uncomfortable in my nether regions as was Alison, so we stopped at a nether area for a picnic. Upon dismounting my trusty electric steed ones posterior was definitely protesting about the unaccustomed treatment it had received and I walked with a bowlegged gait to the loch side where we had sandwiches and warm beer. I didn't complain about the warm beer for my mind was on other things. I am sure all my fellow cyclists out there will have more than a slight inkling to what I am referring to.

 

Time passed too quickly until it was suggested that we remount our cycles and once again sallied forth keeping pace with a steam ship sailing on calm waters in the sunshine to  Stroneachlachar. I rather envied the passengers, some who were, no doubt, enjoying a beer with condensation running from their glasses and with body nether regions that were not protesting.

 

After another mile or so, enough was enough for Alison and myself while intrepid Petal, John and Daisy disappeared over the rise with a cheery wave of the hand together with the remains of the picnic.

 

To make a short story even longer I must tell you that we took double the time to return to the visitor centre than it took on the outward journey, because there was a considerable portion of the journey conducted on foot.

 

Much to our amusement we noticed distance markers on the railings of occasional bridges that turned a mile into half a mile and we thought that crows had some influence to define the numbers displayed.

 

Alison and I had to wait for five hours until John and Petal returned, during which period, my posterior was much recovered but still complained while walking in the fashion of a bow legged cowboy with three months on the saddle. I remarked to Alison that the ideal seat that I could imagine for my cycle, would be one similar to the large tin seats on old fashioned tractors, on which the driver bounces up and down on while traversing uneven ground. It would look a bit silly though, and occupy a lot of room in the car.

 

You can understand my predicament and I would like to hear from anyone that has a solution that will make cycling more enjoyable for my posterior. It has been suggested that my saddle should be sloping backwards slightly which is something I must try, but after a time, for whenever I look at my bike saddle a little tear forms in my eye caused by the memory of that cycle ride in which a little tear formed in both eyes most of the time.

 

I leave you with a picture of  Daisy enjoying the travel in the first class carriage and hope you enjoyed reading my little tale and thank you for your suggestions concerning saddle pain relief.

 

IMG_20190802_113430.thumb.jpg.6911989f4c4d90a55869f27616bffe9b.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

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19 minutes ago, BOAC said:

your suggestions concerning saddle pain relief.

 

I certainly used to know the feeling.   My solution was to increase the size of the saddle.   Mine looks as though it should be on a motor-bike rather than an electric bike - but it's comfortable.

 

IMG_20190810_122240.jpg.dd8fdbdd32e99d847cce3d61ae8de7f0.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Sheets of rain ?  No rain here but sunny spells but 85 mph gusts of wind down here on the South coast . Not ideal towing or cycling conditions .

 

 

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave

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I've cycled that route twice now. No problems with a sore bum.  My advice is to wear proper cycle shorts, the padding stops the chaffing. If you don't like showing off your legs wear the shorts under your trousers. Cycle shops also sell padded cycling underwear.  What I don't understand is how you were affected after just 4 miles on an "electric bike". 

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Get yourselves recumbent bikes which have seats with backrests.

I used to ride 10,000 miles a year on a recumbent bike and I also rode 1000 miles in 12 days for charity.

7IMG_2466.jpg

7turnertrio.jpg

7IMG_2200.jpg

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Thanks for the story BOAC. A story with a sting in the tail. ;)

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43 minutes ago, bessacarr425 said:

I've cycled that route twice now. No problems with a sore bum.  My advice is to wear proper cycle shorts, the padding stops the chaffing. If you don't like showing off your legs wear the shorts under your trousers. Cycle shops also sell padded cycling underwear.  What I don't understand is how you were affected after just 4 miles on an "electric bike". 

I use the padded cycling underwear; they are referred to by both me and Mrs Marchie as my incontinence pants ... :rolleyes:

Steve

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1 hour ago, bessacarr425 said:

What I don't understand is how you were affected after just 4 miles on an "electric bike". 

 

 

Trying to save battery power since this was the first long ride we had done. I didn't want to have zero power on the return journey, however, Petal did the whole 25 miles with power setting on low and only used one of the four light indicators if you see what I mean. Going by that she could have had enough battery on low setting for at least 50 miles maybe. I could be wrong. I am no expert on E-bikes.

 

 

2 hours ago, Jaydug said:

 

I certainly used to know the feeling.   My solution was to increase the size of the saddle.   Mine looks as though it should be on a motor-bike rather than an electric bike - but it's comfortable.

 

 

 

 

Thanks for taking the trouble to post the pic. Seems the way to go - and Steve's  incontinence pants suggestion.

 

Which reminds me - On the phone - Incontinence help line - Can you hold please.:D

 

Thanks to all for your replies.

 

Pete

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2 hours ago, CommanderDave said:

Sheets of rain ?  No rain here but sunny spells but 85 mph gusts of wind down here on the South coast . Not ideal towing or cycling conditions .

 

 

 

Dave

 

 

Aw! Go on. On the cycle with two broom handles and a sheet between the two. Maybe 50 mph. Good luck tacking though :D

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we used to have gel saddles

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Gel saddles are useless, it’s all marketing. The harder the saddle the better, I cycle a lot and a proper decent saddle never has gel in it. (You can pay well in excess of £200 for a saddle).

Attached are pictures of my roadbike and MTB saddles,  I can happily sit on them for 5 hours+ without any problems, I do have quite expensive bib shorts with chamois padding but even without they would be better than a gel saddle.

BEE08E61-90AB-424F-961A-469122B36C2B.jpeg

085DD32B-7787-46F5-8F1F-125E8DE144AC.jpeg

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Daisy’s mode of transport looks far less painful and not so tiring😜 says portly he sat here watching the trees bending in half whilst calmly sipping a 🍺🍺

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Just looking at that brings tears to my eyes.

 

John

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I would have thought more cycling is the answer. start with short rides and build up to long rides so effected area

gets used to being on a saddle

 

macafee2

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2 hours ago, BOAC said:

 

 

Trying to save battery power since this was the first long ride we had done. I didn't want to have zero power on the return journey, however, Petal did the whole 25 miles with power setting on low and only used one of the four light indicators if you see what I mean. Going by that she could have had enough battery on low setting for at least 50 miles maybe. I could be wrong. I am no expert on E-bikes.

 

 

 

 

Thanks for taking the trouble to post the pic. Seems the way to go - and Steve's  incontinence pants suggestion.

 

Which reminds me - On the phone - Incontinence help line - Can you hold please.:D

 

Thanks to all for your replies.

 

Pete

The Incontinence Help Line will be closed for 2 days next week whilst it relocates to Leek ... :D

Press 1 to speak to an Adviser, Press 2 to leave a Message, and Press your bladder if you're standing on a tarpaulin ...'

Steve

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lol

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I find that saddle position has more of an effect on comfort than the saddle itself. Fore-aft and inclination angle are critical for me. I tend to suffer lower back pain rather than bum-sores!

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I do not cycle any more but seem to remember it is better if the saddle points down slightly at the front so the weight is taken on hips rather than softer parts in front. I used to use cycling shorts with a chamois lining and following advice from a racing cyclist, vaseline at the top of legs/groin helps prevent sores.

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