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dave56

Wheel bolt torque olympus ll 462 2012

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Hi there! Can anyone confirm the wheel bolt torque for my Olympus ll 462 2012. There is a sticker on the wheel arch which states 88 lb ft which I have always set them to but a recent service says that the bolts  have  been tightened to 130 nm(95 ft lb.)  Many thanks. David..

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Depends whether the wheels are alloy or steel. Which are they?

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Hi there .They are alloy.Dave

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I have a pegasus 462. I have switched to WSL bolts on my alloys and Bailey advise 130nm on them.

John

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Thanks  John but I still have the original bolts.Dave

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All wheel bolts are tightened to the correct
torque. For alloy wheels the wheel bolts
should be tightened to a torque of 160Nm
(Newton Metres) (118 lb-ft), for steel wheels
the wheel bolts should be tightened to a
torque of 120Nm (88 lb-ft).

 

from the 2012 olympus 2 manual. This may be currently out of date. A quick call to Bailey may be a good idea

John

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120-130nm for alloy wheels, the only change to this is specifically for 11 unicorns which had the wheel bolt issue, and this was recommended to be 160nm

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Many thanks for all the help.Thanks to Caravantech for  a  very definitive answer. All done and dusted -bolts set at 130nm and ready for our forthcoming trip to the Yorkshire Dales. Regards to all. Davd.

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Posted (edited)

But do recheck them between 20 to 30 miles of first towing. I know we should not "need to" but the fact of life here is we "do need to", yours just might be one that requires it.

Edited by JTQ
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120 Nm for Alloys

1 hour ago, JTQ said:

But do recheck them between 20 to 30 miles of first towing. I know we should not "need to" but the fact of life here is we "do need to", yours just might be one that requires it.

That’s good practice JTQ, car or caravan 

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1 hour ago, JTQ said:

But do recheck them between 20 to 30 miles of first towing. I know we should not "need to" but the fact of life here is we "do need to", yours just might be one that requires it.

I asked the ATS Fitter about checking the wheel nuts on our Tiguan after[very early] Friday morning's puncture replacement, bearing in mind I was planning to tow for some 200 miles around M25/M40/M6.

'Naw, no need. I'll just torque 'em up. Don't need to bother after 30 miles ...'. On the bright side, my buttocks are much firmer after 4 hours unbroken clenching ...

Steve

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Our fitter (not a National Co.) but another caravanner ( Avondale Landranger) insisted we check the torque after 50 miles and then again after another 100....

 

geoff

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22 minutes ago, shipbroker said:

Our fitter (not a National Co.) but another caravanner ( Avondale Landranger) insisted we check the torque after 50 miles and then again after another 100....

 

geoff

I was quite surprised by the ATS Fitter's response, bearing in mind the oft posted 'Check after 30 miles' etc advice. The Fitter invited me to watch as he tightened the wheel nuts and the Deputy Manager did the torque check, including the selected torque setting on the wrench. I just wondered whether the tyre industry has decided that modern technology is sufficiently reliable for the 30 miles checks to be abandoned. The Deputy Manager did say in response to my direct question that there was no need to drive carefully/gently for the first 50 miles or so after the change of tyres [i.e. to avoid putting a new tyre under stress straight away]. 'A tyre's a tyre, ennit?' was the cryptic reply ... I'd always understood that it was necessary to take it easy after a tyre change until the new rubber had worn any manufacturing residue of coatings or similar off the tyre surface.

If it's 2 fewer things to worry about, that's fine by me. But I would like to know if it is sound advice or just any old BS to get me out of the tyre bay.

 

Steve

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14 minutes ago, marchie1053 said:

I was quite surprised by the ATS Fitter's response, bearing in mind the oft posted 'Check after 30 miles' etc advice. The Fitter invited me to watch as he tightened the wheel nuts and the Deputy Manager did the torque check, including the selected torque setting on the wrench. I just wondered whether the tyre industry has decided that modern technology is sufficiently reliable for the 30 miles checks to be abandoned. The Deputy Manager did say in response to my direct question that there was no need to drive carefully/gently for the first 50 miles or so after the change of tyres [i.e. to avoid putting a new tyre under stress straight away]. 'A tyre's a tyre, ennit?' was the cryptic reply ... I'd always understood that it was necessary to take it easy after a tyre change until the new rubber had worn any manufacturing residue of coatings or similar off the tyre surface.

If it's 2 fewer things to worry about, that's fine by me. But I would like to know if it is sound advice or just any old BS to get me out of the tyre bay.

 

Steve

 

You wouldn't welly a motorcycle with new tyres in the first 50 miles (or more) until the mould release compound has worn off.... 

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It's all very well saying check after 30 miles or whatever but I was under the impression that it was unwise to tighten hot/warm wheel bolts.

 

So what are we supposed to do on a 300 mile tow for instance,sit in a layby for two hours until the wheels cool down,or is it OK to torque up hot/warm bolts.

 

Ian

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20 minutes ago, Guzzilazz said:

 

You wouldn't welly a motorcycle with new tyres in the first 50 miles (or more) until the mould release compound has worn off.... 

True. But I wouldn't tow my caravan with a motorbike! Especially not with the drum brakes on my [former] 1955 Triumph 6T Thunderbird ... I used to leave a nice, long stopping gap between the Thunderbird and the car in front, and of course, a car would nip into the gap and reduce it considerably. \my \stock mutter to myself on such occasions was, 'In a minute,I'm going to be sitting in your back seat, with fresh air rushing through the hole in the rear screen, telling you why that was a silly manoeuvre ...'

Steve

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The ATS fitter might not know of the particular issues there have and continue to be with caravan wheel retention, or simply might not be the brightest in the pack. Even with a car it is prudent to recheck after a wheel has been disturbed, Halfords I recently found to their credit take the vehicle for a run after renewing tyres and then re torque the bolts.

 

Re possible issues with hot wheels, my take is that torquing bolts dry as we do inevitably  leads to a quite wide spread of tensions, so the precise tension can't be critical, no where near as critical as the need to recheck the tightness of caravan wheel bolts after a wheel has been disturbed. From then on checking every three odd months is my practice.

 

The use of collared spacer bolts as offered by WSL greatly improves the overall design, simply by achieving a longer elastic section of the bolts.

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