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Hobby 645 vip, legal to tow in UK?

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Posted (edited)
37 minutes ago, Nilrem said:

I thought the insurance cover for you to drive another persons car was provided by your insurance company when you had fully comprehensive insurance. My insurance clearly states that I can drive another persons car (providing I am driving with the owner's express consent). I can't recall if my German car insurance said the same thing.

 

 No, at least in Germany, the insurance is for the car, not for the driver.

 

53 minutes ago, Borussia 1900 said:

I have a German (EU) Driving Licence, I am not resident in the UK, when I visit my sister in the UK I sometimes drive her car (it's insured for any driver). Am I breaking the law?

 

Since 1997 there is no such thing as a German driving licence. It is an EU licence which happens to be issued in Germany. It makes no reference to your country of permanent residence and you do not have to swap it if you move into another EU country.

 

Edited by Lutz

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13 minutes ago, Lutz said:

 

Since 1997 there is no such thing as a German driving licence. It is an EU licence which happens to be issued in Germany.

I gave up my UK EU licence, I now have a German EU licence, I didn't need to swap it but because I have a CE entitlement it makes it easier getting the medical done. On exchange I lost my 'H' Category, it doesn't exist in Germany, so much for EU Harmonisation of standards.

Apparently EU nationals living in the UK for more than 2 years must swap theirs.

 

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53 minutes ago, Borussia 1900 said:

I have a German (EU) Driving Licence, I am not resident in the UK, when I visit my sister in the UK I sometimes drive her car (it's insured for any driver). Am I breaking the law?

No. But you would break the law if you moved back to the UK but still drove your German registered car. Does not seem to be policed much. A look on a parking lot outside a tech company and half the cars can be forreign registered.

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My car's in Germany are only insured for myself and my wife to drive, nobody else.

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Towtug said:

.

 

................. A few years ago a joint HMRC, Police and Border agency task force was launched on behalf of and partly funded by the EU to correct this.

Part of this was I think called Operation Jessica.............................

 

I guess as a result of this you started to see fewer foreign registered cars on the streets.

 

 

 

Still going strong around my area  https://twitter.com/roadpolicebch?lang=en&lang=en

1 hour ago, Nilrem said:

I thought the insurance cover for you to drive another persons car was provided by your insurance company when you had fully comprehensive insurance. My insurance clearly states that I can drive another persons car (providing I am driving with the owner's express consent). I can't recall if my German car insurance said the same thing.

 

 

If your UK  insurance covers "driving other vehicles" - and many no longer do so - the vehicle to be driven must have its own insurance i.e. a valid policy showing the registration number and your insurance policy cover is restricted to third party only.  Blame continuous insurance legislation for this!

Edited by beejay

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, AndersG said:

No. But you would break the law if you moved back to the UK but still drove your German registered car. Does not seem to be policed much. A look on a parking lot outside a tech company and half the cars can be forreign registered.

 

If they are company cars, owned and registered by the company at its permanent address abroad and not by its UK unit or partner, there's nothing wrong with that.

Edited by Lutz

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On 05/07/2019 at 11:29, Brecon said:

They do not need the spec for a particular van, they know the legal length is 7 mtrs and yes they will measure if they have any doubt. I have had mine measured on two occasions when inspected by them.

 

A completely different animal with no relationship to a caravan.

They are classified as Semi articulated Trailers , whereas "normal" caravans are Centre axle trailers. 

Similar regulations exist for both.

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On 08/07/2019 at 10:52, beejay said:

If your UK  insurance covers "driving other vehicles" - and many no longer do so - the vehicle to be driven must have its own insurance i.e. a valid policy showing the registration number and your insurance policy cover is restricted to third party only.  Blame continuous insurance legislation for this!

I'm not sure I can see the link there, care to explain?

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On 08/07/2019 at 09:31, Nilrem said:

I thought the insurance cover for you to drive another persons car was provided by your insurance company when you had fully comprehensive insurance. My insurance clearly states that I can drive another persons car (providing I am driving with the owner's express consent). I can't recall if my German car insurance said the same thing.

 

Your insurance usually only provides Third Party cover to drive a vehicle not registered to you.

 

Meaning if you have a bump and were deemed responsible for it they will cover the damage to the third party vehicle involved, but you would have to pay for damage to the vehicle you are driving.

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8 minutes ago, AJGalaxy2012 said:

I'm not sure I can see the link there, care to explain?

 

It's a requirement for any vehicle used on the public highway to be specifically insured - there are exceptions to cover motor trade use (trade plates). Driving other vehicles does still require that vehicle to be insured in its own right.

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1 hour ago, Black Grouse said:

 

It's a requirement for any vehicle used on the public highway to be specifically insured - there are exceptions to cover motor trade use (trade plates). Driving other vehicles does still require that vehicle to be insured in its own right.

That doesnt answer the question I was asking. What does continuous insurance requirement have to do with insured to drive any vehicle on your policy?

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30 minutes ago, AJGalaxy2012 said:

That doesnt answer the question I was asking. What does continuous insurance requirement have to do with insured to drive any vehicle on your policy?

 

If it doesn't have continuous insurance in it's own right, an offence is being committed if it's on the public highway - driving other cars doesn't permit such a car to be driven.

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4 hours ago, AJGalaxy2012 said:

I'm not sure I can see the link there, care to explain?

 

It's been answered by BG but as you were aiming at my post.....

 

Before continuous insurance legislation it was possible to drive an uninsured car under the  "driving other cars" provision. Now a car on the road has to have its own policy  and many insurers seem to have used the continuous insurance requirement to remove the "d-o-c" cover.  Mine still has it but my wife's doesn't.

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3 hours ago, Black Grouse said:

 

If it doesn't have continuous insurance in it's own right, an offence is being committed if it's on the public highway - driving other cars doesn't permit such a car to be driven.

BG Yes I understand that, my question was why does the introduction of continuous insurance cause the drive any car feature of insurance to be removed? I just don't see the link between the two.

1 hour ago, beejay said:

 

It's been answered by BG but as you were aiming at my post.....

 

Before continuous insurance legislation it was possible to drive an uninsured car under the  "driving other cars" provision. Now a car on the road has to have its own policy  and many insurers seem to have used the continuous insurance requirement to remove the "d-o-c" cover.  Mine still has it but my wife's doesn't.

Im not convinced that insurers removed it because of continuous insurance requirements, thats really not logical. In the past some policies have had it and others not. No matter, thanks for the explanation.

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