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Tintaglia

Holiday insurance after heart attack

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Three weeks ago (despite being a 62 year old, fit, slimish non-smoker with no family history of heart problems) what I thought was indigestion turned out to be a heart attack!  Two stents later and I'm fine again but I'm thinking about what will hapen to travel insurance cost?  Does an existing condition mean they will quadruple my insurance?  Or worse?  

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Probably.

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Good news is you can drive and have no need to inform DVLA.  https://www.gov.uk/heart-attacks-and-driving

 

Bad news is Insurance may well be more but I suspect a specialist forum can help more than CT:  Perhaps  https://www.bhf.org.uk/informationsupport/support/practical-support/travel-insurance

 

All you can do is get quotes to find out how bad it will be.

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Medical travel compared

My list of pre existing, is endless

I got anual multi trip for less than my previous wanted for a two week holiday

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First, I hope you recover well.

A lot depends on your insurer and the type and extent of cover.  You must keep the insurer informed or risk no cover under the failure to disclose "duty of declaration" conditions.

From my own experience and that of friends who have had similar health issues, your premium will probably at least double and the excess may well double or worse. This may continue for a number of years, possibly for ever. 

There is also a possibility that repatriation cover or air ambulance cover will be restricted to yourself only if the policy is for yourself and partner/spouse.  Again, seek clarification of any small print in endorsements.

Your GP or cardiologist may provide a supportive letter regarding the prognosis.

I wish you well.

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Posted (edited)
22 minutes ago, Rodders53 said:

Good news is you can drive and have no need to inform DVLA.  https://www.gov.uk/heart-attacks-and-driving

 

Bad news is Insurance may well be more but I suspect a specialist forum can help more than CT:  Perhaps  https://www.bhf.org.uk/informationsupport/support/practical-support/travel-insurance

 

All you can do is get quotes to find out how bad it will be.

wow hang on a second,  this depends on what sort of license the driver has. Car and motorcycle you are right you don't need to tell dvla.  Bus, hgv, coach then you have to tell DVLA. Not sure about Taxi

 

As for holiday insurance it may well go up but the further in the past it is the increase is less as for insurnace it wont go up match if at all. Thing about a heart attack is, once stents are in and you are on medication it as deemed as being fixed,.  It is not deemed an on going issue.

 

macafee2

Edited by macafee2

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3 minutes ago, macafee2 said:

wow hang on a second,  this depends on what sort of license the driver has.

Agreed. I did link to the DVLA so you and others could read it from the horse's mouth!

 

I also know how to edit quotes to just the relevant bit to keep the thread more readable. ;)

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Thanks. :)  I knew about the motor insurance side.  I have a normal car license.  You do have to notify DVLC if you have a pacemaker fitted rather than just stents though.  It's all new territory to me and quite a shock.  I thought I was invincible!  :unsure:

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I had a Replacement Aortic Valve in 2013,  The CMC would not renew my Policy in 2014 and 2015 so insured with EHIC Plus at a competitive rate ,returned to CMC in 2016 onwards, just to keep everything under one roof to speak

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50 minutes ago, Rodders53 said:

Agreed. I did link to the DVLA so you and others could read it from the horse's mouth!

 

I also know how to edit quotes to just the relevant bit to keep the thread more readable. ;)

irrespective of the links, you posted "Good news is you can drive and have no need to inform DVLA"  you did not make it clear to anyone that is depends on license. 

 

macafee2

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13 minutes ago, macafee2 said:

you did not make it clear to anyone that is depends on license. 

Few of us have other than standard licences.  Get off the high horse!

 

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Although you don't need to tell DVLA, you don't come out of hospital and get in the car and drive.  You can only drive when your doctor says you can, which can be minimum six weeks.  If you do, your insurance may well not cover you.  So be warned.

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I had angina at 49 and a heart attack at 51, I have 6 stents fitted. :o.

 

I had and still do have a bank account that includes family travel insurance with the Co-Op, the exact account is no longer available but I can continue with it as I am an existing customer. It is a number of years since my heart issues and I have to say I was pretty shocked to find that when I declared the events to the insurance company (underwritten by Axa I believe), there was no increase at all, and cover was full and included any heart issues :D.

This continued until this years declaration and I was not too upset when I had to pay an annual fee of £30 to cover  the pre existing heart conditions. The bank account costs me £11 / month and I get mobile phone cover and gadget insurance to boot.

 

I have actually used the insurance when I injured my knee in Canada and they were very good, we both got to fly home in business class as I needed to have my knee elevated and I had to have a chaperone (SWMBO). I would have preferred not to have cut short our holiday but at least the insurance help was pretty painless.

 

Strangely I looked at changing to a Nationwide account offering similar cover but they refused to accept my pre existing heart conditions. At the time of the request I believe that the two banks travel insurance were underwritten by the same insurance company.

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47 minutes ago, Rodders53 said:

Few of us have other than standard licences.  Get off the high horse!

 

Not on a high horse, what you posted was at risk of being read and acted upon by someone that has had or has a heart attack and falls into the category of needing to tell the DVLA but don't because of your post. Instead of getting grumpy why not just accept I have a valid point?

 

macafee2

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For goodness' sake people! Surely ANYBODY who has a need to tell anybody about something as serious as a heart condition will find out the relevant information from the insurers/DVLA/medical authorities, and not simply ignore it  because "somebody on a website that I use said it would be OK"...........would they?

 

Surely the OP, (Tintaglia), was just asking for our (elderly) experiences of medical conditions. Lets not start zimmer frame wars.:ph34r:

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Posted (edited)
24 minutes ago, Townie said:

Surely the OP, (Tintaglia), was just asking for our (elderly) experiences of medical conditions. Lets not start zimmer frame wars.:ph34r:

Yes that was all.  Just interested in others experiences.  Interesting to read Super Red's post.  I already have that Nationwide account so it will be interesting to see what their reaction is.  I was told by all the various specialists that I could drive after 48 hours.  I feel absolutely fine.  I wouldn't even know that anything had happened to me (two days after the procedure) if it wasn't for a very slightly swollen wrist!

 

I have just been for a nice gentle 20 min stroll out onto a headland nearby.  What a fantastic thing angioplasty is and I am truly grateful for the marvellous care I got and just to be alive really.  :)   My main right coronary artery was 98% blocked. 

Edited by Tintaglia
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2 hours ago, Tintaglia said:

Thanks. :)  I knew about the motor insurance side.  I have a normal car license.  You do have to notify DVLC if you have a pacemaker fitted rather than just stents though.  It's all new territory to me and quite a shock.  I thought I was invincible!  :unsure:

 

I have one stent from my heart attack 5 years ago. I really can't see it's had an impact on my car insurance I certainly haven't become uninsurable. Also, I've driven HGV's with stent fitted (that is a different and notifiable condition).  As for travel insurance, all perfectly doable, possibly a bit more expensive but I buy insurance for each trip because nearly all my foreign travel is for work and I recharge the insurance cost per job I do. A recent 8 day trip to Tanzania was £17 I think, hardly a deal breaker. I 've done a 3 week trip to Australia a couple of years back, I really don't remember what the cost was other than to say it wasn't so high as to make me remember it. 

 

The insurance questionnaires all seem pretty similar once you have seen a few., they are required when you have pre-existing conditions. You'll be asked how many stents and about your medication regime. If similar to me that means you'll be taking medications which are certain to be asked questions about. At the end of the questionnaire you'll see a summary of what you have declared which makes it easy to check you've mentioned everything. 

 

Since having the stent fitted I've probably had around 30 single trip policies, all my travel insurance has been with a company called 'Southdowns', it has been a piece of cake and I would say at a reasonable price.  

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24 minutes ago, Tintaglia said:

I wouldn't even know that anything had happened to me (two days after the procedure) if it wasn't for a very slightly swollen wrist!

 

I have just been for a nice gentle 20 min stroll out onto a headland nearby.  What a fantastic thing angioplasty is and I am truly grateful for the marvellous care I got and just to be alive really.  :)   My main right coronary artery was 98% blocked. 

Couldn't agree more. My strongest memory of it all was the temperature in the cath lab, it was absolutely freezing and when I came out onto the ward after the procedure I was shivering badly. Other than that I feel great. My only concern is that at he time I was told that stents don't last forever.

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1 hour ago, Babstreefern said:

Although you don't need to tell DVLA, you don't come out of hospital and get in the car and drive.  You can only drive when your doctor says you can, which can be minimum six weeks.  If you do, your insurance may well not cover you.  So be warned.

 

Case by case, I don't think there are hard and fast rules, in my case it was 4 weeks.,that was information given at time of discharge.  

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32 minutes ago, Tintaglia said:

 ..... I have just been for a nice gentle 20 min stroll out onto a headland nearby.  What a fantastic thing angioplasty is and I am truly grateful for the marvellous care I got and just to be alive really.  :)   My main right coronary artery was 98% blocked. ....

 

I couldn't agree more, it is fantastic. The one thing I'll never forget is how 'chatty' the lady surgeon was who carried out the stenting, She encouraged me to watch what she was doing on the monitor above the operating table. :lol:

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They were all brilliant and explained everything.  I did get some pretty bad pain which is fairly unusual.  I had morphine but it was still a bit of an ordeal.  But an hour afterwards and I was fine.   I noticed the freezing cold too, she said it was for 'this' machine which I think was the xray scanner.  So much tech in there, no wonder they call it a lab! 

 

Just in case anyone else does the daft thing I did and ignores chest pain and takes paracetamol  thinking it's bad indigestion, it is vital that if you get any sort of chest pain dial 999 and let them decide because you can seriously damage your heart by leaving it and risking another event.  I went to the GP the next day (feeling fine) and got bundled straight into an ambulance.  I was very lucky.    

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I have been arranging travel insurance for my 94 year old relative for three years now-all trips to Europe 6 to 16 weeks duration.

You will find most insurance companies are lazy and make a lot of profits insuring fit young holiday makers.

Try companies that deal with clients who have complex medical conditions eg Red Pennant who insure ancient oldsters like the above-and me-72 with complex neurological disease.

They are only interested in your medical state if

1 you are awaiting medical intervention

2 results of the above

3 you are aware your condition has deteriorated-before you travel

4 you take Warfarin type blood thinning pills-and the dosage is increasing.

Her premiums range from £280 for a 6 week trip to £800 for 16 weeks.

Insurance includes flight medical repatriation.

You will find as long as you have a pulse you will get travel insurance-but-cost increases with decreptitude 😀

 

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Posted (edited)

I agree with ancell. I have had a couple heart attacks but have been ok for 20 or so years now.  I used Nationwide's Insurance UK policy for some years and was paying additional premium for the variety of drugs I was taking (they measure your risk by the drugs you take, and also additional days (over 30 days). I got suspicious that they were not playing fair when I was taken off one of the drugs but when I renewed the following year they refused to reduce the extra premium. I went back to Red Pennant and answered all their questions honestly, and found their premium much lower than Nationwide's free cover. I have stayed with Red Pennant for several years now and paid this year £217 for two of us personal and motoring for a 32 day holiday. If you answer all the questions honestly you will pay a little extra but not an inordinate amount. By the way I am 74 and my wife 72. Give them a call or just try the website and you may be pleasantly surprised.

Edited by Ern
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4 hours ago, Townie said:

For goodness' sake people! Surely ANYBODY who has a need to tell anybody about something as serious as a heart condition will find out the relevant information from the insurers/DVLA/medical authorities, and not simply ignore it  because "somebody on a website that I use said it would be OK"...........would they?

 

Surely the OP, (Tintaglia), was just asking for our (elderly) experiences of medical conditions. Lets not start zimmer frame wars.:ph34r:

The op's post seems to contradict that train of thought as they have posted here and not asked their insurance company :)

 

macafee2

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The answer is simple - just ask your insurers. Better than forum conjecture.

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