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Dobloseven

New pads and discs,how hard can it be?

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Thought I'd give the brakes in my faithful Renault Kangoo(car type) a bit of love as it's almost nine years old and 120k miles, Mot next month. Front pads and discs and rear pads have been changed before, but rear discs are original. Thought I'd change everything and the fluid as well. Phoned a parts place that was very helpful getting me the same parts for the Korando last year. Gave me a price of £212,which was a lot more than the Korando parts cost so I thanked him and said I'd let him know. Phoned another larger outfit who came up with a price of way over£400 pounds. Realised then that the rear discs are expensive because they incorporate the hub and bearing, a bit like the Alko caravan drums. By then everywhere else is shut, so went on the GSF website which came up with a price of £187 pounds for their lowest priced parts. Tried to order online as the price was with 60% discount which ran out at midnight. However the front discs were out of stock which confused matters. GSF branch is very near us so I went in in the morning to see what they could do. Best price he could come up with was almost £350 over the counter. He gave me the part nos and suggested I tried online again. Went to the first place, an old fashioned motor factor type place tucked away on an industrial estate and bought the parts from there.Man got the price down to £200.Parts are Apec which I've always found to be at least as good as OE. Started job at 2pm on Saturday, bought a new torque wrench that morning, and rescued a compressor from the back of the garage for an air impact wrench. I'd got the right size socket for the hub nut and the tool for winding back the rear caliper pistons, raring to go. Got one rear stripped down easily, rear discs were very scored and corroded. and then it started raining. Eventually rain stopped and got the rears finished. Got first front disc replaced, came to fit the pads and found they were the wrong ones. Parts place had shut at 12.30,old pads weren't too bad so put them in to keep the job moving. Started on the last front, puny Aldi impact wrench wouldn't touch the wheel bolts, ended up with a seven foot length of steel tube over a socket handle. No idea how they got so tight. Always use the same tyre place who make a big fuss over tightening with a torque wrench. By the time I'd finished and tidied up and tested the brakes it was well after 7pm.Got the correct pads today which cost an extra £4 and have just finished putting the in. So £209 all in with a fiver for some fluid. Plus about six hours of my life. 

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I’m a trained Mechanic (to City & Guilds Level 4) but I’ve not turned a spanner for 15 years now, too lazy, I get someone else to do all my servicing nowadays.  I can quite happily spend hours stripping and rebuilding bikes though.

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You need a laptop as a mechanic nowadays. First thing that they do is connect it up to the truck when you take it in .

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Its the feeling of achievement when it works...well done...

 garage recently quoted me 4 to 5 hours at £125 an hour to change cars radiator plus would only use official rad at £200. :( ...  did it myself with rad from ebay costing  £55  , in just over 3 hours...     :)     

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In over 50 years of motoring the only thing that I've not done on cars is welding. Everything else has been tackled, however now I can afford it I don't do it anymore.

 

I'm  not sure that I really got a great sense of achievement because i had to do it out of necessity although it was pretty satisfying when an engine would restart after being dismantled to it's component parts, likewise gearboxes and differentials. 

 

It now goes to the dealer for it's tfl.

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Posted (edited)

Normally I quite enjoy doing jobs like that on cars. If one gets someone else to do it, the car has to be taken and collected, or wait while its done, by which time you could have almost done it yourself. It's just that on this occasion a lot of things seemed to be against me. I don't normally shop around for parts, tending to use GSF because they're handy. I found the motor factors, All Vehicle Parts, by chance, when I wanted pads and discs for the Ssangyong and the others couldn't help. I always use the main dealers for servicing whilst cars are under warranty, though even then I'll do pads and discs myself. I've done a lot of welding over the years having bought a Mig about thirty years ago which is still in use. I find working on cars is more enjoyable if you've not got to get it back together for work next day! 

Edited by Dobloseven
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42 minutes ago, matelodave said:

In over 50 years of motoring the only thing that I've not done on cars is welding. Everything else has been tackled, however now I can afford it I don't do it anymore.

 

 

 

Ever tried finding an intermittent Canbus fault?

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Two years ago the Xsara Picasso needed front pads & discs, which a few years ago, I would have done myself, without a second thought. but I have a man to do things for me now. since ripping 3 tendons off my shoulder.

 

Pads & discs cost £40 trade, and my man did them for £20.

 

£60 all in - I was quite happy with that!

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When fitting new pads it can take 100 miles or so to bed them in to get full braking back. I once replaced both front and back at the same time and had to be careful for a week whilst they were bedding in. After that I only ever do front and back at different times.

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Did the rear pads and discs on the pickup a couple of weeks ago which included handbrake adjustment, nice sense of achievement when it was done though.

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Had to smile today in the motor factors when I went in to get the correct pads. Man on counter was searching on the computer for a condenser for a Triumph TR6. Doesnt seem long since every petrol station had them in bubble packs behind the till. Seem to remember the same part fitted everything with a Lucas distibutor from a Reliant Robin to a Rolls Royce. 

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10 hours ago, Dobloseven said:

Had to smile today in the motor factors when I went in to get the correct pads. Man on counter was searching on the computer for a condenser for a Triumph TR6. Doesnt seem long since every petrol station had them in bubble packs behind the till. Seem to remember the same part fitted everything with a Lucas distibutor from a Reliant Robin to a Rolls Royce. 

I've got one in the centre console of my MG!

Redundant now since I put on an electronic programmable dizzy some years ago 😊

 

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 I used to do all the work, except welding, on my cars until my first new one, a Nissan Micra in 1998. I remember many  Saturday mornings going round the scrapyards looking for bits to bodge them together for another week or 2. I found a  Lada in one scrappys which didn't look too bad, so took it for an M.O.T.  it didn't fail on much so paid £20 for it and £45 to get it through the test. It lasted us almost the whole year.

 Any one remember Charlie Browns auto centres? I was in there getting some bits and couldn't resist asking the apprentice on the counter if they could get a radiator for a VW Beetle, he was looking through the parts books for 10 minutes before his supervisor, after he stopped giggling, told him they were air cooled. :beardy:

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I always did (and still do) everything, welding, paint & prep, mechanical etc.  I'm currently in the middle of a gearbox swap in my 1957 Ford Ranchero (I'm not reconditioning it though, an automatic gearbox is witchcraft to me).  I've always been interested in cars and restored many from the ground up, but home maintenance of them was a financial necessity many years ago and it's just carried on from there.  While my cars have always been company cars (hence maintained elsewhere under contract) I always serviced and repaired my wife's cars but I have to confess that the appeal of lying on a cold garage floor is slowly diminishing!

AOD out.jpg

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I do quite a bit on our cars, but i like to leave brakes to the professionals these days!!

In the last couple of weeks I've patched up the exhaust on the shogun to keep it going a couple of times - its totally shot to be honest, but I'm waiting on my tax rebate to get a new one as I want a stainless one which believe it or not is way cheaper than getting it done at the usual exhaust centres - I've been quoted prices ranging from £1600 to just over £2000!! Found a complete new exhaust on line for £650, but that means doing it myself. 

Found out a few days ago that Mrs W's step dads nephew has a pipe bender & now makes custom stainless exhausts in his welding shop, so will be giving him a call in the next few days.

Have also re-wired the rear lights on the shogun so that i now have high level rear lights and indicators, not just the ones in the bumper. 

Have also done the headlights on our Nissan Note as they were 'crazed' & covered so badly that you hardly noticed they were on. Bought a kit from amazon for £8 with various grades of wet & dry & went to work with a bucket of water & i must say they now look like a new set of headlights. 

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Posted (edited)

Interesting thread. My dad owned the village garage in the '50s and I often called on my way home from school to pass tools to a mechanic in the pit and get in the way. I still do servicing, exhausts and brakes on the cars and motorbike at home. A few months ago it was rear (drum) brakes on Mrs H's car after hearing the unmistakable sound of shoe-to-drum contact on one side. Why are the back shoes worn out after only 80K miles? Siezed self-adjuster and a siezed piston making one shoe do the work of two. Off to the motor factors for a set of shoes and one-shot nuts (sound familiar?), dismantle, drift out the siezed piston and hone the cylinder bore. Drum damage negligible. Free off the adjuster and  put it all back together.  Bleed the brakes with my ancient Gunson Ezibleed and it's time for a road test. Soon after, new back pads and discs and a handbrake cable on my car which is straightforward. It's MoT month in June and the cars will be getting a yearly oil and filter service soon. Retirement means we don't do the miles we did but I still look forward to an excuse to get the overalls on.

 

Keep the tales of mechanical wizardry coming!

Edited by hawkaye
accuracy

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After being in the motor trade too long I now have a tendency to let the man in the workshop do a lot of my mechanics, 

I had my front pads changed where I get my car MOTd, I'd arranged for the pads changing after the MOT, £80 all in.

 

All done and dusted and I was back on the road quicker than I could have dug the jack and stands out of the shed :)


As my trade was a paint squirter and panel beater I can weld either gas or mig as well being handy at mechanics.

 

 

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Last MOT report listed the front brake pads as part worn, the lady in the Mercedes service dept said they didn't need doing yet but it was company policy to report after pads got to 50% worn.

 

The quote for doing the pads only was..........................

 

 

£360:angry:

 

I asked at an independent repair / MOT centre who quoted me "around" £120.

 

Wonder where I will be taking it for the work.:lol:

 

 

 

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Friends over the road lease a A Class Merc,the terms of the agreement that only genuine parts are used,wipers replaced at last service £40 please. 

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On ‎21‎/‎05‎/‎2019 at 18:18, jwa said:

Friends over the road lease a A Class Merc,the terms of the agreement that only genuine parts are used,wipers replaced at last service £40 please. 

 

Will they actually know or check the wipers?

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28 minutes ago, xtrailman said:

 

Will they actually know or check the wipers?

Who knows,but having seen lease cars checked they might. Also after servicing the car it was valeted but for some reason they put tyre dressing on first,then power washed the car. The result being they had the car in for a day to remove the dressing from the bodywork. 

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3 hours ago, xtrailman said:

 

Will they actually know or check the wipers?

 

Genuine Benz wipers carry a very clear 'three-pointed star' logo, needs nothing more than a passing glance to check. 

 

My car was fitted with genuine Benz wipers when I bought it, needless to say as the car is now 11 years old I do not buy such branded items. In fact, having a job as a relief driver for a local motor fact, I tend to buy whatever we stock, with staff discount who would do anything else?  

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I enjoy working on the motorcycles, having restored amongst others a Velo Venom, 1931 hand-change Sunbeam, aerial Arrow, BSA A10, and my current machine a 1952 Norton ES2 over the last few years. But bikes are great because nothing is too heavy to lift. I now find it a struggle even to change a wheel on my Discovery (they weigh a tonne) but am very happy to do stuff on the top end as well as routine servicing.

 

I've found it really pays to have an electronic diagnostic device for the Land Rover as I don't have to go to my local independent workshop for trivia. Although much cheaper than a main dealer, £70 an hour soon mounts up.

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I much prefer working on bikes than tanks and trucks like I used to, the parts are so much lighter.

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4 hours ago, iansoady said:

I enjoy working on the motorcycles, having restored amongst others a Velo Venom, 1931 hand-change Sunbeam, aerial Arrow, BSA A10, and my current machine a 1952 Norton ES2 over the last few years. But bikes are great because nothing is too heavy to lift. I now find it a struggle even to change a wheel on my Discovery (they weigh a tonne) but am very happy to do stuff on the top end as well as routine servicing.

 

I've found it really pays to have an electronic diagnostic device for the Land Rover as I don't have to go to my local independent workshop for trivia. Although much cheaper than a main dealer, £70 an hour soon mounts up.

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It's not a "proper" Norton, where's the oil puddle? :) Lovely job, well done that man!

1 hour ago, Borussia 1900 said:

I much prefer working on bikes than tanks and trucks like I used to, the parts are so much lighter.

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I suppose it'll be ok when you get it finished;)

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