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Fireman Iain

Who names caravans?

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I sit at our favourite site near Beadnell, after a long sunny dog walk, bbq and a glass of wine, and looking around the site, a thought goes through my little mind. 

 

Which demented nutters choose the names for caravans?

 

Ours is a Swift. Although I tow fairly quickly, at about 65-70mph on motorways, whatever else it may be, it isn’t Swift. 

 

We have as neighbours a Crusader, which brings up images of Knights in armour heading off to battle, which I’m not sure the septuagenarian owners can live up to. 

 

Then along the way theres a Sirocco, a hurricane force desert wind. 

 

And in the next field is an Olympus, some sort of Greek God, if memory serves. 

 

And a Pastiche, a poor copy of something else. 

 

Our own hideously named Swift is further lumbered with the title Kudos, which as a tarted up basic caravan, it has little of. 

 

What sort of marketing loony believes these these names actually help sell their products.

 

The only realistically named van is opposite us, an Elddis Rambler, which brings to my mind gentle wandering around the lanes, with a side association of unhappy walkers who complain a lot about trivial things. That is pure marketing genius. 

 

Anyone got any other gems?

 

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Cut down on the wine!!

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Tabbert name theirs after famous Italians,ours is a Puccini, but you can also get Vivaldi’s, Rosinni’s, Da Vinci’s, Celinni‘s.

 

However, we call ours Stephanie 

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We named our previous 'van Jenny, it was an Avondale Wren. We haven't bothered naming our current one yet  :)

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"Wee Berthy" Being a twa berth cawavan....

 

GAS ...

 

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My mother-in-law was Edna Bailey, so our Orion was named 'Edna'.

 

The Pursuit is named 'Edna Too'!

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Fireman Iain said:

 

 

Which demented nutters choose the names for caravans?

 

 

 

it will be the same people that name paint colours......................

 

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I don’t get the name Pastiche either, it’s not even naff just simply awful - surely Coachman know what it means!

 

I suppose ‘Wobblybox 540’ wouldn’t sell terribly well, or the ‘Shedpull 650’ - Bailey do quite well with the Unicorn or Pegasus but the Phoenix is definitely pushing it.

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37 minutes ago, Woodie106 said:

it will be the same people that name paint colours......................

 

Rhino Cerisse and Turk Wars style of thing? :P

Steve

1 hour ago, Grumpy Auld Smeesh said:

"Wee Berthy" Being a twa berth cawavan....

 

GAS ...

 

We have a Gobur Folding Caravan. Living in Scotland, it was always going to be 'Wee Gobby' ... Its tow mate is Tig,  a VW Tiguan. Gobby and Tig are inseparable - well, as long as the Breakaway Cable works ...

 

Steve

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Our Caochman and the previous four Coachman vans have been called James, as in "Home James and don't spare the horses"   (and I do know the origin of this saying)

 

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Ours is a Bailey Rimini.  Anyone who's been making things for 70 yrs and is proud enough to put there name to it and is still in business good on them I would use my name to ! Now Rimini , so I believe means Beauty , so what's wrong with that ? Of course it's all in the eye of the beholder I guess.  Not an easy job though naming things to please everyone.

 

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Well first one was a Sprite Aerial my call sign GW7MGW, but as to Sprite Musketeer which was not three birth, and not red in colour, seems the British musket was withdrawn 1854 so maybe shows old design?

 

But in the main I thing manufactures tend select a theme Leyland named their wagons after shire horses which seems to make sense, however not everyone realises a Boxer is a shire horse not a dog.

 

I suspect Musketeer was because it was always on the move.

 

We have been considering a name for our new house, Nyth Wyvern we favour, as Wyvern is part of family crest, did consider Tŷ Wyvern  and I suppose we could call house Tŷ Wyvern and caravan Nyth Wyvern. However must check in case it has other meaning would not call our house Tŷ Bach although mother called her house Wernbach or little swamp, seems it was name of farm where they spent their honeymoon.

 

Maybe simply Wern newydd how that becomes new home I don't know, not a Welsh speaker. I would have thought it was new bog?

 

But I think often caravan names are linked to freedom, being as free as a bird.

 

 

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1 hour ago, James Donald said:

Ours is a Bailey Rimini.  Anyone who's been making things for 70 yrs and is proud enough to put there name to it and is still in business good on them I would use my name to ! Now Rimini , so I believe means Beauty , so what's wrong with that ? Of course it's all in the eye of the beholder I guess.  Not an easy job though naming things to please everyone.

 

Those Bailey models are named after Towns & Cities - Spanish for the Unicorn range (Cadiz for example) & Italian for the Pegasus vans (like your Rimini).

 

But I agree.  Trying to come up with new model names all the time must get harder and harder.

 

It's just as bad with cars.  We have a "Sportage". 

If you pronounce it "Sportaaaghe"  - trying to make it sound like a French word, you sound like a plonk... foolish person.  Pronounce it "Sportidge" makes you sound a bit illiterate.

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Good job they’re not named after a town in Staffordshire .🤨😎

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4 hours ago, pepys1660 said:

It's just as bad with cars.  We have a "Sportage". 

If you pronounce it "Sportaaaghe"  - trying to make it sound like a French word, you sound like a plonk... foolish person.  Pronounce it "Sportidge" makes you sound a bit illiterate.

I have a Pajero (it's a Shogun in the UK), I believe its a predatory cat. However, in Spanish Pajero has a very different meaning (google it) so there it is called  Montero.

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28 minutes ago, Borussia 1900 said:

I have a Pajero (it's a Shogun in the UK), I believe its a predatory cat. However, in Spanish Pajero has a very different meaning (google it) so there it is called  Montero.

Bet that gets a few smiles south of the border .

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1 hour ago, Borussia 1900 said:

I have a Pajero (it's a Shogun in the UK), I believe its a predatory cat. However, in Spanish Pajero has a very different meaning (google it) so there it is called  Montero.

Perhaps for those who overwinter/spend winter in Spain, the Pajero is aptly named; you 'go' out on the outward leg from the UK and use the verb that describes the opposite motion for the return journey ...

Steve [treading carefully] :P

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12 hours ago, Fireman Iain said:

I sit at our favourite site near Beadnell, after a long sunny dog walk, bbq and a glass of wine, and looking around the site, a thought goes through my little mind. 

 

Which demented nutters choose the names for caravans?

 

Ours is a Swift. Although I tow fairly quickly, at about 65-70mph on motorways, whatever else it may be, it isn’t Swift. 

 

We have as neighbours a Crusader, which brings up images of Knights in armour heading off to battle, which I’m not sure the septuagenarian owners can live up to. 

 

Then along the way theres a Sirocco, a hurricane force desert wind. 

 

And in the next field is an Olympus, some sort of Greek God, if memory serves. 

 

And a Pastiche, a poor copy of something else. 

 

Our own hideously named Swift is further lumbered with the title Kudos, which as a tarted up basic caravan, it has little of. 

 

What sort of marketing loony believes these these names actually help sell their products.

 

The only realistically named van is opposite us, an Elddis Rambler, which brings to my mind gentle wandering around the lanes, with a side association of unhappy walkers who complain a lot about trivial things. That is pure marketing genius. 

 

Anyone got any other gems?

 

I have to admit I did let out a little giggle when I read your post - I have often thought the same myself (perhaps not in so much detail!).

 

Ours is Challenging somebody to something - lord alone knows what?

 

Our last caravan had a one horned mythical animal on an uninhabited spanish islet in the Balearics - not quite sure how those two got together!?

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I’d have thought it more apt to have aquatic names for the Bailey range 😉

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My old one could be called the Coachman Cracker or Elddis Aqua:D

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Borussia 1900 said:

I have a Pajero (it's a Shogun in the UK), I believe its a predatory cat. However, in Spanish Pajero has a very different meaning (google it) so there it is called  Montero.

Just googled it. I'm glad i have a shogun............................. :lol:

 

It's like why the Toyota MR2 never sold very well in France.

My mate was banging on a couple of years ago about buying a Maseratti quattroporte. He kept saying the name with a silly fake Italian accent, until I pointed out that quattroporte just means 4 door. He at first disputed this until his partner confirmed it. He bought an Insignia.  

Edited by Woodie106

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12 minutes ago, Woodie106 said:

It's like why the Toyota MR2 never sold very well in France.

I used to have a Toyota MR2 (the last model they made, bought it new in 2002), great fun little car and I'm not even a hairdresser!

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6 minutes ago, Borussia 1900 said:

I used to have a Toyota MR2 (the last model they made, bought it new in 2002), great fun little car and I'm not even a hairdresser!

My brother had one in the mid 90's. Spent most of its life sat in a garage as he was living in Hong Kong. He sold it to a friend of my sisters at 5 or 6 years old with less than 10,000 miles on the clock & yes, she was a hairdresser!!  

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2 hours ago, Woodie106 said:

It's like why the Toyota MR2 never sold very well in France.  

 

It wasn’t down to the name - the French MR2 was simply called the MR!

 

 

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Who names caravans?

The official model names are presumably named by the manufacturers, often following a theme.

 

Avondale Coachcraft Ltd:

For example the original Avondale models were named after "birds", hence we see names such as Wren, (the smallest model) Sandpiper, Osprey, Sandmartin, Heron, Flamingo, Waxwing and Kingfisher, later to be joined by Avocet, and Goldcrest (the largest model). The exceptions being the Mayfly, that was so named because of a plague of mayflies at the factory when the model was launched, and the Firefly that is also an insect.

The economy models were launched under the "Perle" badge, and these were given classical names such as Orestes, Orion, Argos, Olympus, and originally were available as standard models, or "Supreme" (later renamed "Custom") models that had a little more comfort. Later the Corfu and Ulysses models were added. Then there was the "Leda" range that sat somewhere between the economy models and the clubman style Avondales, and were named after hills; therefore we have the Cambrian, Quantock, Cheviot, Mendip, Malvern, Pennie, Grampian  and Pentland models.

Briefly from 1987 the Mayfair range (also used later for dealer specials) was produced that were named after rivers; the Dovey, Shannon, Tweed and Derwent, and in 1994 Avondale ventured into wider and longer caravans with the "Pantére" range that was aimed at mainland Europe and marked a change from themed caravan model names, to a numerical designation according to the body length. The Pantére was the precursor to the "Landranger" caravans that were launched a couple of years later for the UK market and named by approximate body length and the number of berths. Further model ranges were included, so we have the "Sport" models that were aimed at the younger market and as time moved on the Leda range morphed into the "Rialto" range, and the "Perle" into the "Dart" range.

So from memory there is a potted history of around forty years production, sadly leading to the decision in 2008 to close the touring caravan branch at Avondale, leaving the company to concentrate on trading in various other fields, thus a few 2009 models were the last to leave the Atherstone factory.

 

Who names caravans?

As for owners naming their caravans; well some do and some don't give pet names to their caravans, cars etc.  Personally I don't ;)

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