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Marshwad

Fence Paint on GRP Panel

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I've discovered that my Dad's neighbours splattered the back corner of my van with fence paint last year and didn't bother letting him know!

I've tried unsuccessfully to remove with caravan polish, does anyone have any advice on what I could use to soften the paint enough to lift it off without damaging the GRP panel?

Thanks

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The only sure way is with very fine Wet & Dry (P1200 or 2500) and lots of water.

With gentle pressure the Wet and Dry will polish the GRP as well as removing the paint

 

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PM Tourer-shine (regular poster on here) and ask him. I bet he will have the answer.

 

Let us know what he says! 

 

Andy

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Just a bit of a punt here. Hot water (very) with washing up detergent. Hold a rag on it to make it soak in. Why not? The fence paint is probably water based.

 

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Posted (edited)
18 minutes ago, Ern said:

Just a bit of a punt here. Hot water (very) with washing up detergent. Hold a rag on it to make it soak in. Why not? The fence paint is probably water based.

 

+1 but I use car shampoo instead of washing up detergent.

 

Edited by oldboy

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Autoglym colour restorer .

 

 

Dave

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I find elbow grease works best!

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Just now, MalH said:

I find elbow grease works best!

 

I tried some elbow grease with caravan polish but it just wasn't lifting. 

 

14 hours ago, Ern said:

Just a bit of a punt here. Hot water (very) with washing up detergent. Hold a rag on it to make it soak in. Why not? The fence paint is probably water based.

 

 

Hot water makes sense, I'll give that a try before considering any other chemicals... I'll keep you updated on what works   :)

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Beware that your panel outer coat is gelcoat, and isn't that thick... if you take the abrasive route, be VERY careful that you don't rub through the coat...

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Elbow grease +strong Fenwicks solution then!

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I'd give G3 a try, a little goes a long way!  use plenty of water.

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You ought to find out what the paint used was. That might help determine the best way to remove it.

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8 hours ago, daveat92 said:

You ought to find out what the paint used was. That might help determine the best way to remove it.

 

That being the fence paint of course! 

 

From personal experience fence paint is a devil to remove from many surfaces!

 

Andy

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Posted (edited)

After bouncing messages back and forth with the OP, this situation is not as straight forward as people might imagine.  

 

There is no real 'one way' DIY answer when it comes to this type of damage and fix.  

Ironically, we had a 2009 Lunar only yesterday in Leicester, that the owners storage site had sprayed a shed with exactly the same paint as this situation.  As you'd expect, the storage owners tried a few things, the caravan owner tried a few other things, but after exhausting all the daft/bizarre internet remedies and advice they both realised this isn't a straight forward problem.   Unfortunately some of the remedies they'd tried removed not only the shed paint, but also the caravan paint, thankfully they'd tested the worst products on the roof, where it's not so obvious to the owner in the future. 

 

The biggest consideration in these situation are 2 things:  How old is the Caravan, and what is it constructed from.  Yesterdays Lunar was a 2009, and the sides were aluminium, front and rear ABS.  From experience the aluminium will be oxidised on the sides of a Lunar, the ABS won't be.  This means the paint that hits the oxidised side will absorb into the oxidation, making it very difficult to remove, and even when you do finally remove the spots, you are left with a panel that has dozens of little patches.  The fix is a full machine polish.  Removing the oxidation across the whole side, thus removing the paint spots and as per yesterdays job, the whole Caravan looking like new again.  The ABS is slightly different, because it still has it's shine, and therefor far easier to remove the spots with a very sight machine polish, without the need to do the full panel, although it makes sense to do it anyway.

 

As for the above Caravan.  This is a 2011 Bailey Orion.  A full GRP construction, and totally normal to be dull at this age, and much newer in many cases.  GRP is worse than aluminium for absorbing this type of damage, and it's far harder to restore.  Any of the above remedies may of left the Caravan looking potentially worse, and very patchy.  This only real fix, is again Restore the full panel, leaving it consistently glossy top to bottom. The issue in this situation is where do you stop?? The whole Caravan is dull, which is normal for this make and model.  Do you restore the full Caravan, or do you fix the effected panel, leaving one glossy panel, and the rest dull.  

A newer Caravan, or one that's been correctly paint sealed from new, or even one that the owner waxes a couple of times a year might of been a totally different story with this this type of damage, but again it's sometimes easier to ask people like myself, who is more than happy to advise the best course of action, even if that means we don't actually do the job, rather than following some internet advice, that can potentially make things far worse.  

 

I might not get too involved on here anymore unless it's directly to do with my name, or my experience, but I do pop in every few days to have a quick read, and any PMs are sent directly to my phone, meaning i'm pretty quick at picking them up.

I've said it several times before, but will again.  I'm here to offer advice if it's not an obvious fix.  People often ask why I give away this time, and it's simple.  Without places like this, my business wouldn't be into it's 12th year, and for those that I just advise the best way forward, there are 10 fold those that have us do the work. 

 

Oh and as for yesterdays Lunar, the storage owners paid for all the work.  This meant the Lunar owner had a full Restoration, turning their dull tired looking Caravan, back to it's factory shine, for the sake of a few spots of paint.  They were rather happy as you'd expect ;)

Edited by Tourershine

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I have found that methylated spirits will remove a lot of adhesives and paint splashes.

Add some to a rag and gently rub the area, then repeat that a minutes later - the first application seems to soften things and the second application cleans it off.

Also, baby wipes are very good for general cleaning of plastic surfaces.

Best of luck

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With respect, I would avoid any abrasive wet & dry papers or compounds.  I would try the meths route first (and white spirit if that doesn't work) using a cotton bud, but try it on a less obvious spot first, not letting it sit too long on the paintwork.  Good luck, perhaps you could let us know how you get on.

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