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wolfgang1983

Just thought

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Posted (edited)

Hi,

 

I had my first power cut today lucky was the mains power switch went first.

 

But I would like to know is it wise to keep a few fuses for the caravan it self?

 

It's my first year in caravan so learning a lot now as it's going to be my main home.

 

I also am working on new piping for my waste water to go in to my waste water tank.

 

 

IMG_20190417_164140.jpg

Edited by wolfgang1983

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We carry a box of spare fuses!

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Are you referring to 12v or 240v?

If the 240v supply is going to trip, it will usually be either the EHU bollard RCD that trips, or one of the MCB’s in the caravan. Either of those should just need resetting ( after investigating why it tripped in the first place).

As for 12v fuses, I would think many carry spares covering a range of currents, and I would certainly advise anyone to do so.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, hp100425ev said:

Are you referring to 12v or 240v?

If the 240v supply is going to trip, it will usually be either the EHU bollard RCD that trips, or one of the MCB’s in the caravan. Either of those should just need resetting ( after investigating why it tripped in the first place).

As for 12v fuses, I would think many carry spares covering a range of currents, and I would certainly advise anyone to do so.

 

I think the reason why caravan power tripped on mains is because I used the 2000watt setting on heater then the 2000watt it's autumn where I am getting colder and the Jug to make a cup of tea. So not going to have them going at same time now,

Edited by wolfgang1983

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That could well do it if you are using a domestic type kettle.

Need a low wattage kettle in the van - takes a little longer to boil but quicker overall when the EHU doesn’t trip!

Still worth having a few spare 12v fuses though, just in case.

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Take care that the waste water doesn't back up into the shower tray ;)

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56 minutes ago, Paul_B said:

Take care that the waste water doesn't back up into the shower tray ;)

 

Which is what happened on Friday to me!

geoff

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21 hours ago, wolfgang1983 said:

But I would like to know is it wise to keep a few fuses for the caravan it self?

It's always advisable to carry an assortment of spares, tools, repair kit and consumables (such as fuses). 

 

21 hours ago, wolfgang1983 said:

I also am working on new piping for my waste water to go in to my waste water tank.

It's fine to link together the waste water from the kitchen and a hand basin, but it is advisable to keep the shower tray drain separate as sink water can back-feed into the shower tray. Been there (thinking I was being clever) done that, and learned my lesson.

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16 hours ago, Paul_B said:

Take care that the waste water doesn't back up into the shower tray ;)

 

Must say that I have never heard of 'backing up' when the two outlets are joined outside the van as shown by the OP.  It's at the lowest part of the system with a larger bore than the rest of the pipes and with a 'decent drop' to the drain or container.

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6 minutes ago, Gordon said:

It's always advisable to carry an assortment of spares, tools, repair kit and consumables (such as fuses). 

 

It's fine to link together the waste water from the kitchen and a hand basin, but it is advisable to keep the shower tray drain separate as sink water can back-feed into the shower tray. Been there (thinking I was being clever) done that, and learned my lesson.

It's strange really when you go back to the good old days, my father & myself to a certain extent always had a good set of tools in the car, nowadays most people don't carry anything. Cars  are - in most cases - very reliable, more likely to need a laptop to diagnose problems. Caravans, however, still seem to have a lot of niggly problems, water leaks seem the most prevalent & aggravating, the industry really needs to pull its finger out. Guess they don't put enough money into R&D so problems manifest themselves to often. 

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, Hairyspinner said:

 Caravans, however, still seem to have a lot of niggly problems, water leaks seem the most prevalent & aggravating, the industry really needs to pull its finger out. Guess they don't put enough money into R&D so problems manifest themselves to often. 

It might help if they didn't put so much of the inevitably limited R&D budget into such things as ever increasing complexity of electronic control panels and regular, but minor, styling changes.

Edited by Stevan
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5 minutes ago, Hairyspinner said:

It's strange really when you go back to the good old days, my father & myself to a certain extent always had a good set of tools in the car, nowadays most people don't carry anything. Cars  are - in most cases - very reliable, more likely to need a laptop to diagnose problems. Caravans, however, still seem to have a lot of niggly problems, water leaks seem the most prevalent & aggravating, the industry really needs to pull its finger out. Guess they don't put enough money into R&D so problems manifest themselves to often. 

I still carry a small toolkit around - one of the most useful of which is a multimeter. Spare fuses, electrical tape and tyraps (zip ties) are all in there as well.

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1 minute ago, matelodave said:

I still carry a small toolkit around - one of the most useful of which is a multimeter. Spare fuses, electrical tape and tyraps (zip ties) are all in there as well.

As do many of us I'm sure, but it seems to be an ever increasing toolkit, now including several different sorts of charging leads, spare window stays etc. I probably should rationalise it, but every time I try I meet a friend on site in desperate need of a tool or spare that I have recently thrown out!

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Ditto small simple basic tool bag stowed in Caravan with spare fuses, bulbs & a few misc bits etc. Little used but essential when needed. Small tool box in car to assist.

Tripping out when overloading or a fault - think most have had it - we often check at Reception on arrival for access to box info to self-reset if needed. Some sites do fine (charge) you for a call out to un-lock & reset !!

Budget conscious friends cope easily with a 6 amp (circa 1.5 kw) supply when long staying in Spain, they even dont really use the gas ! They just get used to switching off and on when needed and even use it for their 1kw overnight heating as well. Rarely tripped out. 6A unlimited is included in the 14 euro nightly site pitch fee !

Other friends average 3 trip outs per weekend when on the CMC 16A / circa 4kw sites.

 

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22 hours ago, wolfgang1983 said:

Hi,

 

I had my first power cut today lucky was the mains power switch went first.

 

But I would like to know is it wise to keep a few fuses for the caravan it self?

 

It's my first year in caravan so learning a lot now as it's going to be my main home.

 

I also am working on new piping for my waste water to go in to my waste water tank.

 

 

IMG_20190417_164140.jpg

A good modification to the drainage that!  A further development here.

 

 

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19 hours ago, wolfgang1983 said:

 

I think the reason why caravan power tripped on mains is because I used the 2000watt setting on heater then the 2000watt it's autumn where I am getting colder and the Jug to make a cup of tea. So not going to have them going at same time now,

Your mains power 230V AC is protected by re-settable overload and earth leakage devices. No replacement fuses are needed.

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3 hours ago, SamD said:

 

Must say that I have never heard of 'backing up' when the two outlets are joined outside the van as shown by the OP.  It's at the lowest part of the system with a larger bore than the rest of the pipes and with a 'decent drop' to the drain or container.

Trust me, the kitchen sink water can emerge through the shower tray outlet so best to avoid linking those two drain pipes, simply because the shower outlet is so close to the height of the grey water container.

That said, I have also removed the corrugated waste pipe on many caravans, and replaced it with domestic plastic rigid waste pipes, and included a standard "U bend" under the kitchen sink to minimise the pongs. I have still retained a dedicated outlet for the shower though.

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I have just had to hose down the two sinks and the shower compartment because of 'backing up' as described above......not for the first time.

 

geoff

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46 minutes ago, Gordon said:

Trust me, the kitchen sink water can emerge through the shower tray outlet so best to avoid linking those two drain pipes, simply because the shower outlet is so close to the height of the grey water container.

That said, I have also removed the corrugated waste pipe on many caravans, and replaced it with domestic plastic rigid waste pipes, and included a standard "U bend" under the kitchen sink to minimise the pongs. I have still retained a dedicated outlet for the shower though.

 

Mayhap that is the reason why I have never had a problem.  I cannot remember the last time I used a waste water container.

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I think Gordon may mean the wastemaster.

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1 hour ago, WispMan said:

I think Gordon may mean the wastemaster.

 

Not sure if that was for me but if so I had understood that ta, it's just that I always use the pitch drain or the hedge on CLs with, therefore, a much better 'drop'

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Gordon meant a waste water container of any kind, whether wastemaster or bucket. Ground level is still nearer to the shower tray than any sink in the caravan, and water can still back up and emerge in the shower tray even with a pipe leading directly to a ground drain. Believe me, it has happened to our outfit, hence my earlier advice.

Gordon.

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1 hour ago, Gordon said:

 Believe me, it has happened to our outfit, hence my earlier advice.

Gordon.

And us :)

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On 24/04/2019 at 14:12, SamD said:

 

Not sure if that was for me but if so I had understood that ta, it's just that I always use the pitch drain or the hedge on CLs with, therefore, a much better 'drop'

That may account for the niff on some around some CL pitches!

 

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On 24/04/2019 at 12:15, shipbroker said:

I have just had to hose down the two sinks and the shower compartment because of 'backing up' as described above......not for the first time.

 

geoff

Not in the caravan,but in our French hovel in the early stages of the renovations - this hastened the refitting of the bathroom by some months ...

There was only 1 [narrow bore] pipe exiting the bathroom wall to a very crude septic tank. Only afterwards did it dawn on me that everything from the bathroom made its way into  the wider world via this route. I flushed the loo, and was about to step into the over bath shower when the processed contents of my breakfast climbed back up the bath plug hole ... Breakfast didn't smell like that when I ate it ...

New bathroom, proper[function separated] pipework, and the latest European Standard septic tank resolved the issue; and almost 7 years later, the pain of the €16,000+ bill has faded ... The initial  phone estimate for the septic tank was 'c€4,500', but subject to the Technical Survey ... 'Good news is that there is only 1 style of septic tank that will fit on this limited size of site [what used to be the front garden!]. Bad news is that it is the most expensive - €11,000 will leave a margin of a few hundred euros for any incidental work ...'

One of many occasions when I have asked Mrs Marchie why we thought it was a good idea to buy the hovel :blink:

 

Steve

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