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david 1220

Making caravans --- Australia style !

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At 4:56 on the video it says, "Every inch of the interior and exterior are gone over with a fine toothed comb. The van will not leave the production line until every last problem has been fixed". A lesson for some UK manufacturers maybe, as any subsequent PDI at the dealer should find nothing wrong?

 

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Aussie caravans have to endure extreme heat and are liable to travel on unsealed roads for many kms.  They therefore are built to a much more robust specification.

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Caravanning - Aussie style!

 

 

 

John.

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2 minutes ago, MalH said:

Aussie caravans have to endure extreme heat and are liable to travel on unsealed roads for many kms.  They therefore are built to a much more robust specification.

By contrast, UK caravans have to endure UK weather and are liable to travel over potholes for many miles. They therefore are built of the lightest materials possible :blink: and given a minuscule payload limit.

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49 minutes ago, Gordon said:

By contrast, UK caravans have to endure UK weather and are liable to travel over potholes for many miles. They therefore are built of the lightest materials possible :blink: and given a minuscule payload limit.

 

Yup, you've summed it up perfectly!

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54 minutes ago, Gordon said:

By contrast, UK caravans have to endure UK weather and are liable to travel over potholes for many miles. They therefore are built of the lightest materials possible :blink: and given a minuscule payload limit.

UK potholes are trivial compared to long unpaved roads. UK caravan makers are also hamstrung by people wanting to stay within 85% of a lightweight towcar, and a B+E limit set at the worst possible level for caravanners.

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2 hours ago, Stevan said:

UK potholes are trivial compared to long unpaved roads. UK caravan makers are also hamstrung by people wanting to stay within 85% of a lightweight towcar, and a B+E limit set at the worst possible level for caravanners.

 

With an Australian C class driving licence you can drive a car with a gross vehicle weight of 4500kg and tow a 9 tonne trailer with that. That's even more than one would be allowed to do with a C1E licence over here, let alone a B+E licence.

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3 hours ago, MalH said:

Aussie caravans have to endure extreme heat and are liable to travel on unsealed roads for many kms.  They therefore are built to a much more robust specification.

Dont know about the heat but the road conditions are the same.........

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1 hour ago, Lutz said:

 

With an Australian C class driving licence you can drive a car with a gross vehicle weight of 4500kg and tow a 9 tonne trailer with that. That's even more than one would be allowed to do with a C1E licence over here, let alone a B+E licence.

 

Indeed, friends of ours live in their 'van travelling throughout Oz 8 months a year....their 2 berth caravan weighs about 2650 kgs and is only 5.30 m long,same size as my Elddis at 1500....

 

geoff

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4 hours ago, david 1220 said:

Dont know about the heat but the road conditions are the same.........

Not when you get off the sealed roads they aren't. Been on a few unsealed gravel roads that shake car about like crazy at anything over 20km/ hour. 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, TenStar said:

Not when you get off the sealed roads they aren't. Been on a few unsealed gravel roads that shake car about like crazy at anything over 20km/ hour. 

 

Yes, try the Gibb River Road for size. 900 km of corrugated surface and a few deep river fords thrown in. Not your average British highway.... A UK caravan might survive half of it,

Edited by MalH

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Gordon said:

At 4:56 on the video it says, "Every inch of the interior and exterior are gone over with a fine toothed comb. The van will not leave the production line until every last problem has been fixed". A lesson for some UK manufacturers maybe, as any subsequent PDI at the dealer should find nothing wrong?

 

 

Quality but they don't enjoy a long warranty or do they not need it ?

 

https://www.jayco.com.au/promo/warranty-terms

 

When I used to belong to FROG forum I found the same with US manufacturers I could not understand how owners of new RVs spending hundred thousand dollars and they only got a 12 month warranty and if it went wrong they would just sort it out themselves .

 

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave

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10 hours ago, CommanderDave said:

I could not understand how owners of new RVs spending hundred thousand dollars and they only got a 12 month warranty and if it went wrong they would just sort it out themselves

Dave,

My point was that new UK caravans can already have "faults" when first delivered to the dealer for sale, when they should be "perfect" at that point. I made no reference to any warranty period as that is a whole new topic in itself.

In practice, because we are all different, those of us with a little savvy will make minor repairs to our caravans, while others will expect the dealer to address every minor detail for as long as they own the caravan. Providing the product is fault-free when purchased I stand somewhere in the middle on this; I'm prepared to carry out day to day maintenance and minor repairs but expect the dealer to address more major problems that may be attributable to poor quality of manufacture.

 

11 hours ago, MalH said:

Yes, try the Gibb River Road for size. 900 km of corrugated surface and a few deep river fords thrown in. Not your average British highway.... A UK caravan might survive half of it,

MalH,

I am not suggesting that UK caravans should be built to full "off road" standards but they should certainly be able to mount a kerb, or negotiate the occasional farm track without breaking.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Gordon said:

 

I am not suggesting that UK caravans should be built to full "off road" standards but they should certainly be able to mount a kerb, or negotiate the occasional farm track without breaking.

 

I think you've slightly missed my point Gordon. I was asserting that Aussie caravans necessarily have to be constructed much more robustly due to the range of conditions to which they are subjected, and the Gibb River Road is a classic illustration.  We saw lots of towed caravans doing that trip (we were tent camping).  If they were built to British standards they would shake apart. I agree that we should expect something that will withstand the hazards you mention - my one experience of a leaking van came after a 3 week tour of Ireland in the days when all their roads were atrocious.

Edited by MalH

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18 hours ago, TenStar said:

Not when you get off the sealed roads they aren't. Been on a few unsealed gravel roads that shake car about like crazy at anything over 20km/ hour. 

The faster you travel the less you feel the bumps, ask any Car Rally Driver/Co-Driver, I used to be one

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On 01/04/2019 at 11:54, Les Medes said:

The faster you travel the less you feel the bumps, ask any Car Rally Driver/Co-Driver, I used to be one

 

   I've driven a lot on East African dried mud roads (  helped to marshall the Safari Rally ) and driving slow is a real bone shaker!  If you increase your speed, you'll find a sweet spot at which the corrugations appear to level out.   :)

    John.

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3 hours ago, Leedslad said:

 

   I've driven a lot on East African dried mud roads (  helped to marshall the Safari Rally ) and driving slow is a real bone shaker!  If you increase your speed, you'll find a sweet spot at which the corrugations appear to level out.   :)

    John.

Spot as at about 50-60mph is the ideal speed.  Just need to be careful on bends and keep a look out for animals in just you need to brake.  Unfortunately I lost a Vauxhall Cresta car on a bend, hit the side of a bridge and flipped over into the river bed which luckily was empty due to drought.  believe it or not the car was still drivable after they recovered it although front and rear were bent and cab pushed done a bit.  Strong car!

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50 minutes ago, Durbanite said:

Spot as at about 50-60mph is the ideal speed.  Just need to be careful on bends and keep a look out for animals in just you need to brake.  Unfortunately I lost a Vauxhall Cresta car on a bend, hit the side of a bridge and flipped over into the river bed which luckily was empty due to drought.  believe it or not the car was still drivable after they recovered it although front and rear were bent and cab pushed done a bit.  Strong car!

 

The ideal speed will vary , dependent on the natural frequency of the springs, the stiffness of the dampers and of course the nature of the road.

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1 hour ago, Black Grouse said:

 

The ideal speed will vary , dependent on the natural frequency of the springs, the stiffness of the dampers and of course the nature of the road.

Most of my driving on gravel roads was in a normal sedan with no modifications like the Cortina MKII.   Also many strips roads like the clip below and I have driven on those actual roads.

 

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