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jetA1

New navigation tool ....

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I've just become aware of a new navigation aid called "what3words", it is a way to identify a location anywhere on the planet and easily make it available to anyone else. 

 

The surface of the earth has been divided into 57 trillion 3 meter squares and each square is identified by a 3-word name. To identify a location you simply use the "what3words" app or web page to search for a location and then make a note of its 3-word label, the label can be easily communicated and then decoded by anyone else using the app or webpage.  It's like a postcode but with 3 meter accuracy.  It is a single system that can be used around the world.  

 

I'm visiting     ///fond.missions.news    this weekend ... see how easily you can identify where it is?

 

I visited this place while on holiday last year, it was very interesting.      ///entitles.unheard.pinstripe    very easy to describe a very specific location. 

 

Apparently, Ford has signed up to use this system linked in some way to the in the in-car navigation system. 

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This was the publicity blurb earlier this week:-

 

Ford Partners With what3words

Ford has announced that it is to partner with UK Tech Startup what3words. The partnership will allow millions of Ford drivers in Europe and North America to use what3words location technology to help them navigate using Ford’s SYNC3 infotainment platform. This is the first partnership with a volume car-maker and means drivers can enter precise destinations by voice or text input easier, faster and with fewer errors than ever before. It also enables them to navigate to any spot on the planet; including those without an address.

We've covered what3words a number of times, simply put it divides the entire planet into 57 trillion 3m x 3m squares, assigning each square a random three-word address. For example, if you want to find your way to a specific place in the Gobi desert, what3words may tell you that its address is “departed.rumbled.awaiting”. Move a few meters to the left, and the three-word address will change. It's a superbly simple system and allows you to easily pass on a location where traditional postcodes aren't an option and Lat/Lon too complex and confusing.

The initial rollout will enable Ford drivers to connect the free what3words app (available on iOS or Android) to their vehicle via their SYNC 3 infotainment platform. They can then input a 3 word address by voice or text, in 6 languages, and navigate to that precise 3m x 3m square. Drivers can find the 3 word address on website contact pages, guidebooks and business cards – wherever they’d find a regular street address.

Courtesy pocketgpsworld.com

 

geoff

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A problem I found with what3words is that it seems only good for A to B.  So you cannot plot a multi location route with it.

 

I emailed what3words with following enquiry.

"Does what3words work between two locations that are not your current location, so that I can plan a journey of various locations."

 

The answer I got back was.

"To answer your question, no this is not a function we currently offer, but you can use other navigation apps such as Navmii and Pocket Earth to get directions between two points other than your current location."

 

Not a deal breaker but makes it less flexible than other nav systems.

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It comes into its own for finding places without postcodes, such as building sites or, with more of a caravanning slant, the gate at the entrance to a rally field, where the postcode covers half a dozen farms spread over a mile or so.

Personally I prefer latitude and longitude.

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On 01/03/2019 at 17:37, jetA1 said:

I'm visiting     ///fond.missions.news    this weekend ... see how easily you can identify where it is?

Looks like an accurate way of defining a precise location but as far as plotting a route from A to B it appears to be problematic.

For now I think I'll stick with the GPS reference, OS reference or the name of the location for navigation.

Gordon.

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If you are going to several locations can you not just enter each one as you head for it :unsure:

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At the moment I'm working at bumps.asking.local.  :unsure:

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19 hours ago, Stevan said:

It comes into its own for finding places without postcodes, such as building sites or, with more of a caravanning slant, the gate at the entrance to a rally field, where the postcode covers half a dozen farms spread over a mile or so.

Personally I prefer latitude and longitude.

 

Yes  latitude and longitude for accuracy, post codes can put you nearly a mile away from where you want to be in rural areas.

what3words sounds perfect though, its simple to use voice commands and accurate.

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8 hours ago, Gordon said:

Looks like an accurate way of defining a precise location but as far as plotting a route from A to B it appears to be problematic.

For now I think I'll stick with the GPS reference, OS reference or the name of the location for navigation.

Gordon.

 

Yes, I was probably wrong to describe it as a navigation system. In itself, it is simply a tool to identify a location, with the possible advantage that it can be used anywhere in the world and has a 3 metre accuracy.  If there is a benefit to come from it it will be when some clever techy types are able to integrate it with navigation tools we already know and use. Given that the reason I know about it is down to a press release which described Ford having some level of liaison with the system than I think that's the likely direction in future. For now it's just a bit of fun looking at the three-word choices of places we know. 

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34 minutes ago, jetA1 said:

 

Yes, I was probably wrong to describe it as a navigation system. In itself, it is simply a tool to identify a location, with the possible advantage that it can be used anywhere in the world and has a 3 metre accuracy.  If there is a benefit to come from it it will be when some clever techy types are able to integrate it with navigation tools we already know and use. Given that the reason I know about it is down to a press release which described Ford having some level of liaison with the system than I think that's the likely direction in future. For now it's just a bit of fun looking at the three-word choices of places we know. 

Nothing particularly clever about incorporating it into any normal sat nav, just requires them to be convinced of its value.

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2 hours ago, jetA1 said:

 

Yes, I was probably wrong to describe it as a navigation system. In itself, it is simply a tool to identify a location, with the possible advantage that it can be used anywhere in the world and has a 3 metre accuracy.  If there is a benefit to come from it it will be when some clever techy types are able to integrate it with navigation tools we already know and use. Given that the reason I know about it is down to a press release which described Ford having some level of liaison with the system than I think that's the likely direction in future. For now it's just a bit of fun looking at the three-word choices of places we know. 

I didn't mean to sound negative for it is a good simple way of defining a small location, and as suggested earlier in the thread, probably has the potential to be easily voice controlled if integrated into a navigation system of the future. Quite how you know what "code words" to enter at the moment is a mystery to me although I'm sure that could be overcome if there's the will to do it. I wonder how the "code words" are chosen?

Gordon

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2 hours ago, Gordon said:

I didn't mean to sound negative for it is a good simple way of defining a small location, and as suggested earlier in the thread, probably has the potential to be easily voice controlled if integrated into a navigation system of the future. Quite how you know what "code words" to enter at the moment is a mystery to me although I'm sure that could be overcome if there's the will to do it. I wonder how the "code words" are chosen?

Gordon

 

I didn't take your comment negatively.  :) . I must admit I'd wondered how the words were chosen, and I must also admit to trying a few rude words and none work so the words appear to have been well chosen. ;) 

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Try typing in "occur.workers.tentacles" to find the front door to CT HQ as indicated in the address shown in the T&Cs :D

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Is it just me or does this seem like an answer looking for a problem? What's the difference between "xxxxx Street, Anytown" and three random words? The random words don't narrow anything down, or give you a clue as to the general area of the world...

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Posted (edited)
57 minutes ago, Guzzilazz said:

Is it just me or does this seem like an answer looking for a problem? What's the difference between "xxxxx Street, Anytown" and three random words? The random words don't narrow anything down, or give you a clue as to the general area of the world...

There are locations which have neither a proper address, nor a postcode. The most common are building sites  or, for us caravanners, rally fields. 

Just try getting a pizza delivered to "The third caravan on the left through the second farm gate down xxx road after the last house in yyy village.

Latitude and longitude tend to get corrupted over the phone, but "occur.workers.tentacles is easy (to use Gordon's example).

What3words uses the words to give an accurate location on a map on any device that runs the app.

 

Edited by Stevan

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Find the location on Google Maps, right click, select 'whats here' and get a co-ordinate location down to 6 decimal points, enter this in your sat nav and off you go!

 

For example, type this into the search on Google Maps 37.021109, -7.970701 and you'll get right into Faro Airport.

 

I'm having a parcel delivered to me at the site we are on near Moncarapacho. There are no street names in the countryside here, and the post code for the address is huge. I asked the owners of the site (small 8 units only) about getting the parcel delivered and they told me that the delivery drivers Google the location and then get the co-ordinates for their sat nav.

 

The co-ordinates took us right into the front yard of the site when we arrived here. It's a great (existing) system and is perfect for locating rally fields etc. back in the UK.

 

It seems to me that there is already a universal location system in place, and has been for years, are they 'reinventing the wheel'?

 

Or have I missed something obvious? :unsure:

 

BH

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3 minutes ago, Blackhart said:

Find the location on Google Maps, right click, select 'whats here' and get a co-ordinate location down to 6 decimal points, enter this in your sat nav and off you go!

 

For example, type this into the search on Google Maps 37.021109, -7.970701 and you'll get right into Faro Airport.

 

I'm having a parcel delivered to me at the site we are on near Moncarapacho. There are no street names in the countryside here, and the post code for the address is huge. I asked the owners of the site (small 8 units only) about getting the parcel delivered and they told me that the delivery drivers Google the location and then get the co-ordinates for their sat nav.

 

The co-ordinates took us right into the front yard of the site when we arrived here. It's a great (existing) system and is perfect for locating rally fields etc. back in the UK.

 

It seems to me that there is already a universal location system in place, and has been for years, are they 'reinventing the wheel'?

 

Or have I missed something obvious? :unsure:

 

BH

Those numbers   37.021109, -7.970701 can be the very devil to accurately convey over the phone.  One digit wrong and you end up with something believable but wrong. Get the slightest mistake in What3words and the mistake is instantly visible because what you get is complete nonsense.

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In Gordon's example one wonders where substituting a Malapropism for "tentacles" would take take one? :rolleyes: :lol:

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53 minutes ago, Blackhart said:

Find the location on Google Maps, right click, select 'whats here' and get a co-ordinate location down to 6 decimal points, enter this in your sat nav and off you go!

 

For example, type this into the search on Google Maps 37.021109, -7.970701 and you'll get right into Faro Airport.

 

I'm having a parcel delivered to me at the site we are on near Moncarapacho. There are no street names in the countryside here, and the post code for the address is huge. I asked the owners of the site (small 8 units only) about getting the parcel delivered and they told me that the delivery drivers Google the location and then get the co-ordinates for their sat nav.

 

The co-ordinates took us right into the front yard of the site when we arrived here. It's a great (existing) system and is perfect for locating rally fields etc. back in the UK.

 

It seems to me that there is already a universal location system in place, and has been for years, are they 'reinventing the wheel'?

 

Or have I missed something obvious? :unsure:

 

BH

 

:goodpost:I find that GPS does everything I want of it.   It's so easy and reliable for long journey route planning.

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24 minutes ago, Jaydug said:

 

:goodpost:I find that GPS does everything I want of it.   It's so easy and reliable for long journey route planning.

GPS is an essential part of What3Words. Without GPS there would be no point to it. What3Words is just an easy way of defining a particular location in a way that can easily be communicated, in the absence of a clear address or postcode. The three words easier to copy to the GPS device than a long string of numbers, and much easier to pass over the phone. In addition, they have a built in error prevention system by any error immediately returning either no location or a nonsense location.

I look forward to the day when What3Words is incorporated as standard into most Sat navs.

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1 hour ago, Blackhart said:

Find the location on Google Maps, right click, select 'whats here' and get a co-ordinate location down to 6 decimal points, enter this in your sat nav and off you go!

 

For example, type this into the search on Google Maps 37.021109, -7.970701 and you'll get right into Faro Airport.

 

I'm having a parcel delivered to me at the site we are on near Moncarapacho. There are no street names in the countryside here, and the post code for the address is huge. I asked the owners of the site (small 8 units only) about getting the parcel delivered and they told me that the delivery drivers Google the location and then get the co-ordinates for their sat nav.

 

The co-ordinates took us right into the front yard of the site when we arrived here. It's a great (existing) system and is perfect for locating rally fields etc. back in the UK.

 

It seems to me that there is already a universal location system in place, and has been for years, are they 'reinventing the wheel'?

 

Or have I missed something obvious? :unsure:

 

BH

 

Coordinate based systems are not as straight forward as they should be, there are several different ways of expressing coordinates which can easily become confusing, especially to a none frequent user. What3words doesn't do anything that coordinates don't do but in my opinion, it does it in a more user-friendly way.  

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4 hours ago, Blackhart said:

Find the location on Google Maps, right click, select 'whats here' and get a co-ordinate location down to 6 decimal points, enter this in your sat nav and off you go!

 

For example, type this into the search on Google Maps 37.021109, -7.970701 and you'll get right into Faro Airport.

 

I'm having a parcel delivered to me at the site we are on near Moncarapacho. There are no street names in the countryside here, and the post code for the address is huge. I asked the owners of the site (small 8 units only) about getting the parcel delivered and they told me that the delivery drivers Google the location and then get the co-ordinates for their sat nav.

 

The co-ordinates took us right into the front yard of the site when we arrived here. It's a great (existing) system and is perfect for locating rally fields etc. back in the UK.

 

It seems to me that there is already a universal location system in place, and has been for years, are they 'reinventing the wheel'?

 

Or have I missed something obvious? :unsure:

 

BH

 

What if your satnav does not take coordinates?

 

 

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Good system to deliver a Cruse Missile to your enemy

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Or even a Cruise missile  :rolleyes:

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Posted (edited)

What some seem to be missing here is that it is a means of identifying a very specific, and small, point on the earths surface. It is NOT meant to be a navigation system .

 

I wonder if there is code for “Point Nemo” which is THE most remote spot on the planet, it’s in the South Pacific. If you are there the nearest human being would be on the ISS as it passes overhead!

 

Andy

Edited by Mr Plodd

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