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How will Brexit affect my holidays in Europe? BBC.

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My wife has just received her first ever EU Passport (German issue), it’s red.

She only got it so she can continue to visit the UK with me, up to now she could travel on her National ID Card.

 

 

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I had to renew mine early due to the changes and am very glad to have 10 years of red passport in front of me.:lol:

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4 hours ago, matelodave said:

That's not actually true - the Passport Office will still be issuing red ones until they've run out so you could end up waiting until 2020 or even longer if our MPs are still poncing around with Brexit as I suspect that they wont be able to issue Blue ones until we actually leave.

Ok, got that, so might have to wait longer, hopefully not too long,

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Borussia 1900 said:

My wife has just received her first ever EU Passport (German issue), it’s red.

She only got it so she can continue to visit the UK with me, up to now she could travel on her National ID Card.

 

 

Where did you get the information from that a passport will become necessary. The information hasn't reached me yet. An ID card can be presented instead of a passport for entry in quite a number of non-EU countries.

Edited by Lutz

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15 hours ago, FrankBullet said:

 

Simple - both countries agree to the four maxims or free movement whilst not being in the EU.

 

Switzerland does have a hard border. It's effectively open for people but not for goods (this was reported by Towtug in another thread)

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Posted (edited)
20 minutes ago, svimes said:

 

Switzerland does have a hard border. It's effectively open for people but not for goods (this was reported by Towtug in another thread)

 

I never passed any border control when entering Switzerland.  Admittedly not a motorway, but a main road over the Jura.  Just a sign to say it was Switzerland.

 

John

Edited by JCloughie

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23 hours ago, matelodave said:

 

I'm not sure but I think the Red ones are actually EU passports but the new blue ones wont be because we wont be members of the EU if we leave (I was going to say when - but that seems like a bit of a maybe :unsure:)

 

Colour, per se,  has nothing to do with it.  It's the 'EU' marking that will be missing on the post-Brexit UK passports.

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16 hours ago, Lutz said:

 

Where did you get the information from that a passport will become necessary. The information hasn't reached me yet. An ID card can be presented instead of a passport for entry in quite a number of non-EU countries.

We (she) presumed that her ID Card is only valid for travel within the EU, better safe than sorry.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, beejay said:

 

Colour, per se,  has nothing to do with it.  It's the 'EU' marking that will be missing on the post-Brexit UK passports.

Agree - but the poster wanted to know when he was gonna get a Blue one.

 

It's a bit of a quandry for the government/passport office to decide what to issue over the next few months, Do they issue EU ones, because we are still in (until we are out) or non-EU ones even though we are still in and therefore still entitled to have an EU passport.

 

So are they sitting poised with a pile of each, waiting with bated breath for the changeover day:unsure: coz if we are still in on 29th March which seems a possibility then they shouldn't really issue non-EU ones.

 

and in the end does anyone really care

Edited by matelodave

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, svimes said:

 

Switzerland does have a hard border. It's effectively open for people but not for goods (this was reported by Towtug in another thread)

 

I used to run a small haulage business, and delivered to Switzerland on occasion. Compared to crossing EU borders with freight, Switzerland is a nightmare, reams of customs papers, hours of delays if there are any questionable details in the customs declarations. They have to be resolved before you are allowed to move, and what's more the freight offices close at night so your goods flow is further restricted.

 

It costs much more to ship goods outside of a customs union, horrendous bureaucracy causes needless delays and time wasting. The Norway freight border is similar.  Brexit, another word for extra , needless bureaucratic  inefficiency, enjoy at your leisure.

Edited by Weekend Traveller
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1 hour ago, Weekend Traveller said:

 

I used to run a small haulage business, and delivered to Switzerland on occasion. Compared to crossing EU borders with freight, Switzerland is a nightmare, reams of customs papers, hours of delays if there are any questionable details in the customs declarations. They have to be resolved before you are allowed to move, and what's more the freight offices close at night so your goods flow is further restricted.

 

It costs much more to ship goods outside of a customs union, horrendous bureaucracy causes needless delays and time wasting. The Norway freight border is similar.  Brexit, another word for extra , needless bureaucratic  inefficiency, enjoy at your leisure.

All that is irrelevant, blue passports are what’s important 😂😂😂 lol

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5 hours ago, shipbroker said:

 

Interesting, when we went into Geneva from Haute Savoie we had to go through a control barrier each way.

 

geoff

 

Just checked with the wife.  We used two routes, one to Geneva the other to the other end of the Lake.

 

Nothing memorable on either.

 

3 hours ago, Weekend Traveller said:

 

I used to run a small haulage business, and delivered to Switzerland on occasion. Compared to crossing EU borders with freight, Switzerland is a nightmare, reams of customs papers, hours of delays if there are any questionable details in the customs declarations. They have to be resolved before you are allowed to move, and what's more the freight offices close at night so your goods flow is further restricted.

 

It costs much more to ship goods outside of a customs union, horrendous bureaucracy causes needless delays and time wasting. The Norway freight border is similar.  Brexit, another word for extra , needless bureaucratic  inefficiency, enjoy at your leisure.

 

Perhaps travel via the back roads.  Wonder if they just use patrols plus big fines.

 

John

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2 hours ago, JCloughie said:

 

Just checked with the wife.  We used two routes, one to Geneva the other to the other end of the Lake.

 

Nothing memorable on either.

 

 

Perhaps travel via the back roads.  Wonder if they just use patrols plus big fines.

 

John

 

We definitely went through a proper border when we entered Switzerland. The kind of setup where they could close it if desired and most certainly monitor very closely what was crossing.

 

The point is that two contributors to this forum with direct experience of importing through the border have stated that it is very different to EU countries.

 

This is a Schengen country.

 

I'm sure you could smuggle a few van loads of something via mountain passes but it doesn't sound like a sustainable solution.

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35 minutes ago, svimes said:

 

We definitely went through a proper border when we entered Switzerland. The kind of setup where they could close it if desired and most certainly monitor very closely what was crossing.

 

The point is that two contributors to this forum with direct experience of importing through the border have stated that it is very different to EU countries.

 

This is a Schengen country.

 

I'm sure you could smuggle a few van loads of something via mountain passes but it doesn't sound like a sustainable solution.

 

I am only stating my experience on two roads into Switzerland.  Yes these were over the mountains,  they were not motorways.  But main roads they certainly were.

 

Did you enter by a motorway?

 

This was about 10 years ago.  I have no doubt that the other contributors who state it is a very different experience for goods are truthful.  I am merely asking how the control was dealt with on the roads I was on.  There were certainly goods vehicles on it.  

 

That is why I asked if it was perhaps handled by patrols.

 

Sorry you appear to doubt my experience.

 

John

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7 hours ago, Weekend Traveller said:

I used to run a small haulage business, and delivered to Switzerland on occasion. Compared to crossing EU borders with freight, Switzerland is a nightmare, reams of customs papers, hours of delays if there are any questionable details in the customs declarations. They have to be resolved before you are allowed to move, and what's more the freight offices close at night so your goods flow is further restricted.

My experience in visiting Switzerland as a tourist with the caravan has certainly involved lots of additional paperwork, with a significant time spent at the border. This was primarily because our caravan, while only being a normal size single axle UK caravan at the time, was both over-length and over-width for the Swiss roads. I was given a route to travel directly to our pre-booked campsite, and because some of the "ordinary" roads for that route were defined as motorways, two  vignettes also had to be purchased to cover both the towcar and the caravan. 

I would still recommend Switzerland as a place to visit but you will need a full wallet to be able to fully enjoy the trip.

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