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Timanita

Build on motor homes ....l

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Hi all, just a general question,as I spend a lot of time on the motorways in the midlands, I’m seeing loads on transporters with motor homes on the back on their way ready for the NEC show.

 

a thought occurred.....do motor homes have the same issues in build quality as caravans...? So, leaks, crackes, all the usual stuff....

 

just wondering...?

 

cheers

 

Tim

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They leak like caravans as the coach-built ones  use the similar techniques and frequently use older methods  not newer ideas like Alutech or equivalent.

 

I have seen some really bad rot in one particular Motorhome.

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13 hours ago, Timanita said:

.....do motor homes have the same issues in build quality as caravans...?

Hi Tim,

Coachbuilts are basically caravans with an engine - so in short - yes . . . but some makes have a better reputation than others that is not necessarily related to their price.

Commercial van conversions generally are  a better bet regarding being weatherproof, but at a cost of restricted space within . . .

You pays yer money 'nd takes yer choice . . .

Gordon.

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Mobile man called out to £76,000 motor home last week,rooflight held in by two pieces of gaffer tape......told them to get back to dealer sharpish!

 

Geoff

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If you look at MH forums you will see that they suffer almost the same issues, certainly damp wise, as caravans do, yet they cost considerably more!! 

 

As a guide have a look through some caravan=MH magazines and see how many businesses advertise damp repair work! 

 

Thorough annual damp checks required for all types of leisure vehicles. A high price certainly doesn’t signify a high build quality either! 

 

 Following my recent experience when trading in from now on I will insist that whoever carries out my annual check confirms, in writing, that they have specifically checked the joints where the floor and walls meet for damp, and that none is present. It “appears” that more than a few these days adopt the attitude of “well its Alutech/solid (or whatever the other timberless systems are) so there is no need to check for damp any more so they simply “tick the box” rather than physically check! That’s clearly what had happened with my pals MH. He had it checked/serviced every year, every year the report said no damp. That’s why it needed £2.5k’s worth of repair in January!!! If it was me I would be looking at sueing the (well known local independent workshop) for breach of contract as they clearly HADNT checked for damp as it was everywhere. 

 

I bought myself a £10 damp meter from ALDI a few weeks ago, mainly to check the moisture content of wood blanks as I do a bit of wood turning. But of course it will now have a secondary (and much more important money-wise) function to perform for me ;) To quote a now disgraced Aussie entertainer..........”Can you guess what it is yet”

 

Andy

 

 

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Apparently ours had damp when I sold it to a dealer even though a week before when it was checked over, all be it at a different dealership, I was told it was dry as a bone!! Dealer I was selling to still bought it for what I wanted for it though, so I think he may have trying his usual ploys when purchasing. 

They are, as has been said above, built basically the same way as caravans. 

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I have often wondered this one.

 

A caravan (usually) only has one axle, so there are no twisting forces on the chassis. And where it has two axles, they are very close together.

 

A motorhome has two axles, spaced some metres apart, so there must be some twisting forces on the chassis.

Yes, I know the suspension takes most of it out, but only by pushing against the chassis. That force has to go somewhere. Ever noticed how much an empty or only lightly laden flat bed truck twists on bumpy ground?

 

Yes, I know they all go up and down, and sideways, but that is not the same as twisting.

 

So, it seems to me that a caravan body is not twisted as much as that on a motorhome. The body of a motorhome therefore has to be a structural element, but is of lightweight construction.

 

The van conversions use the same steel body as the original van, so that is a structural element.

 

Discuss !!

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No idea about coachbuilt motorhomes, but our T25 is solid....   loads of rust of course, but they say it's lighter than carbon fibre, so hey ho...….   No damp panels!   :D

Definitely going to have to get a damp meter if get a new caravan though!

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On 24/02/2019 at 20:11, daveat92 said:

I have often wondered this one.

 

A caravan (usually) only has one axle, so there are no twisting forces on the chassis. And where it has two axles, they are very close together.

 

A motorhome has two axles, spaced some metres apart, so there must be some twisting forces on the chassis.

Yes, I know the suspension takes most of it out, but only by pushing against the chassis. That force has to go somewhere. Ever noticed how much an empty or only lightly laden flat bed truck twists on bumpy ground?

 

Yes, I know they all go up and down, and sideways, but that is not the same as twisting.

 

So, it seems to me that a caravan body is not twisted as much as that on a motorhome. The body of a motorhome therefore has to be a structural element, but is of lightweight construction.

 

The van conversions use the same steel body as the original van, so that is a structural element.

 

Discuss !!

Interesting one this.

We had a big discussion on CT a while back concerning the relative merits of single and twin axle vans in their resistance to twisting along the long axis of the body. This was after lots of reports of panel cracking. The inconclusive conclusions were that longer vans were more at risk and as these were often on a T/A then that combination was seen as more prone.

 

As to your M/H thoughts I can only partly agree as I'd expect the chassis to be more substantial and consequently less likely to impose twisting forces on the body above. Suspension is also better with coil springs and longer throw suspension travel than vans.

I may be totally wrong in this!

I have also seen the rear doors of lorries sliding up and down against each other by several inches. More so when the truck was long, empty and a curtain sider. There is a analogy with light construction longer vans here.

 

I was surprised to hear that coachbuilt motor homes are just as prone to damp ingress and panel cracking as vans. Not seen much about it but then I don't read the M/H sections!😁

 

Finally I'd say that I also bought a damp meter and do a comprehensive check before service time. I then compare the habitation report I get with my own readings. Only had one service so far and it all tallied to within 5-10% with all readings below 20%. 

My dealer knows me well and does this thoroughly!😁

GB.

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