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Airstream as a static ... Looking for possible sites


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Hi peeps,

 

I am looking to buy an Airstream and want to use it as a 'Residential' static caravan so am looking for a caravan park, or parks (Near each other), or a farm etc where I can place it.

I live on the south coast of England but would be willing to move along the south cost from Brighton westwards, and up as far as Warwickshire, South Wales and or the Berkshire area.

 

I know that many caravan sites are not residential but some might be willing to accept a caravan for a few months (Hopefully at least 6 months at a time), that way I can move the Airstream between two sites (Hopefully near to each other) throughout the year.

 

One problem is an Airstream (Although gorgeous) is not a caravan that blends in that easily.

 

Can anyone suggest anywhere?

 

Kindest regards,

Indy

 

Note: Photo is of an Airstream just to give some people an idea as to what I am talking about.

 

Classic-Overview-WhyAirstream-2-TimelessDesign.jpg

Edited by lndy
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I would google commercial/residential caravan sites in the areas that you want, we have commercial sites in Yorkshire who do 10 and 12 month sites.

Someone we know are on a 10 month site and hire a lodge from the owners on a nearby site for 2 months as part of the deal.

Paul B

. .......Mondeo Estate & Elddis Avanté 505 (Tobago)

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The big issue is the "residential" 12 months requirement as that introduces a whole different legal situation to the 10/11 months options. I suspect few sites with 12 months licences are going to be interested in anything but long term tenancy and most probably in vans only supplied by themselves.

 

Moving every 10 months would ease site availability, but a van this size requires a commercial [over 3500KGs] vehicle and the requisite licence to drive it, another possible hurdle.

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Hi JTQ,

 

I would look to move the Airstream from site to site via a low-loader which is why I would hopefully find a couple of sites near to each other.

Ideally having it on one site all year would be best, and I would just move into other accommodation for a couple of months if needed.

 

I'm guessing that there are some sites around that offer this kind of long-term stay (Or farms and other small holdings), finding them is going to be a little difficult which s why I am here asking you guys for any site you may know of. :Thankyou:

 

Ta, Indy

 

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Depends on size as the OP has not been specific despite showing a piccy of an airstream

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A farm is not able to "legally" offer you that facility, they are limited to just 28 days unless it is theirs and then not reguarly occupied.

That said, I know some bend the law, and if caught, it is their legal problem. However, it is you that will be moving and doing that via a low loader and finding where to go is very different to a touring van towed by a normal car.

 

You are into minefield territory here or need to be very lucky no one notices or just someone has the right site licence.

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Forget looking for licensed residential sites, as I can guarantee you will not be allowed to bring your own van on (not least because the site license will almost certainly specify that sited homes must comply with BS3632).

You need to find a privately owned holiday site, preferably with a 12 month licence, that will turn a blind eye to you living on site.

Being 12 months does not turn it into residential, it simply means that you can holiday there at any time during the 12 months - although many people do use them as residential (seems to be equally split between those who make a success of it and those who get caught out and end up homeless).

You need to be aware that you will only have security of tenure as much as your contract gives, nothing in law, and it is possible that the type of site that will accept your airstream will probably be the type of site that will not issue a formal contract anyway.

Whatever you do, find the site first before buying the airstream, and have a contingency plan for either the local council placing an enforcement notice, or the site management changing hands and evicting you.

Good luck in your adventure (although I think that your plan would be better served by buying a towable van that can be moved around easily as/when required).

 

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Thanks everyone for your comments, worth knowing.

 

Just need to mention I'm looking to stay within the law, pay council tax etc, it's just that most sites don't allow 12 months residency for my type of caravan.

 

Thanks,

Indy

 

 

Edited by lndy
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These people may be able to help as a number of the members have ''sited'' Airstreams.

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/ukairstreamers/

Discovery 4 XS SDV6 and Airstream 532 plus 1996 MGF owned since new.

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The C&CC site @ Hertford has caravans on seasonal pitches, with people living in them, that have been on site for years.  They do move around on site occasionally, but I've never seen them move off the site, unless they are moving elsewhere.

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C&CC Terms: The unit may be occupied on Site for recreational purposes only, subject to a maximum of 21 nights for any one visit. An interval of at least 3 nights must elapse before a return visit to the unit situated on the pitch.

 

Caravan Club is similar but vacate for 2 nights. 

Edited by Easy T
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Please differentiate between 12 month sites and residential sites.

ALL licensed residential sites are by default 12 months. A site that says it is "12 month residency" is most likely a holiday site that can stay open all year.

Living in your airstream and staying within the law is almost certainly going to be a problem.

Caravans of any description need planning permission to be used as residences, and caravan sites additionally need licensing.

Licenses are either for leisure use, which means the caravan cannot be your actual residence, or residential use, which means that the caravan has to be your home - but, as already said, there are no licensed residential sites (in England, anyway)  that will allow you to bring on your airstream.

Even if you buy your own land, it is unlikely that you will get planning permission to live in your airstream unless it is being used ancillary to the land (i.e, to look after livestock, or as an annex to an existing house).

Bear in mind that if you want to live on anywhere that is not licensed for residential use (even  a 12 month site) you will not have a legal address for post, car tax, bank, insurance, etc., etc.

People living (illegally) on 12 month leisure sites get round this by using a relative as their "real" address.

Some people also have children living in their real home while they live in the holiday home.

If the site changes hands the new owner will want to redevelop and the first thing they will do is look for anyone breaching the t&c that can be quickly evicted in order to claim the pitch.

If you have a "real" home elsewhere, not such a problem as you just have to move back in with the kids, but if the caravan is your only home, it means you are homeless.

The gov.uk website has information about planning permission and licensing for caravans which may be interesting, but in your case probably of little help.

 

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12 hours ago, 2seaside said:

Living in your airstream and staying within the law is almost certainly going to be a problem.

 

Staying within the law is something many manage to do in similar circumastance. The problem is length of stay and the requirement to be off site for periods.

 

12 hours ago, 2seaside said:

Caravans of any description need planning permission to be used as residences, and caravan sites additionally need licensing.

Caravans don't need planning permission - the sites do and will have it. The problem is the terms and conditions regarding length of stay

 

12 hours ago, 2seaside said:

Licenses are either for leisure use, which means the caravan cannot be your actual residence, or residential use, which means that the caravan has to be your home - but, as already said, there are no licensed residential sites (in England, anyway)  that will allow you to bring on your airstream.

 

As far as sites are concerned if you stick to terms and conditions you are touring. I would not overthink this aspect other than you may wish to consider carefully the insurance aspects for car and caravan.

 

12 hours ago, 2seaside said:

Bear in mind that if you want to live on anywhere that is not licensed for residential use (even  a 12 month site) you will not have a legal address for post, car tax, bank, insurance, etc., etc.

Your legal address will be one where you can be contacted and usually people doing this use family or friends.

 

The biggest problems are having to move for a period of time. Either you or the caravan. The second problem is getting suitable seasonal pitches on suitable sites particularly in winter months. Also if you can't legally tow your caravan yourself then the problem is compounded.

 

Also relevant is why one might seek this semi permanent lifestyle. If it is solely to save money then it becomes more difficult. Whether it is one person or a couple is also significant. If not on a seasonal pitches then saving serious money is unlikely to happen. 

 

I could rent a one bed flat 10 miles from Hereford for £400 a month plus £60 rates if single. If on my own in a caravan not on seasonal pitches It is likely to cost me £450 a month (more like £600 if a couple) although that would include electric but I would probably loose £100 a month in depreciation unless I had a caravan of say 7 years old when it would doubtless reduce. I would have money tied up in a caravan and a larger car to tow it, servicing, insurance, have to move on every 3 weeks. The only real chance of saving any money is with seasonal pitches. That still means leaving the caravan or moving it after 21 days for a period that varies from site to site between 2 nights and 5 nights. 

 

Have you seen any savings??

 

Doing it cheaper with seasonal pitches? I know of somebody who lives full time in a caravan with his wife. He is retired, works part time and chooses that lifestyle. Kast year he had two seasonal pitches with The Caravan Club near the South Coast. Winter season worked out at £150 a month and I suspect Summer closer to £360. So average £255 a month! But wait and add on £100 a month depreciation, £40 servicing and insurance and £60 pro rata for the 2 days ever 3 weeks on another site and we get just over £450 a month.  

 

Their are times it does make sence though if contracting for rxample and moving regularly and away from home most of the week. Other than that it comes down to lifestyle choice.

 

Sorry to ramble

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Would buying an airstream be classed as doing it cheaply :blink:

A friend of ours bought a holiday chalet which can be lived in for 10months, the new site owners have extended this to 12 months if required, council tax is included in the new fees.

 

They also owned a static type caravan which they rented out, this paid the ground rent for both caravan and chalet, unfortunately the new site owners stopped caravans using the site as well as putting the ground rent up amongst other things.

Paul B

. .......Mondeo Estate & Elddis Avanté 505 (Tobago)

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Thanks to Easy T for updating my long post - just one correction.

If you are using a holiday caravan as your main or only home  then you are not staying within the law, as the site licence will stipulate it is for leisure use only.

It will be immaterial whether the site has a 10,11,or 12 month leisure licence and whether you leave the site at intervals or not.

The definition is that you must have a home elsewhere (either in this country or abroad). The more rigorous sites ask to see utility bills in your own name as proof, the "turn a blind eye" sites only ask for an address.

Some sites place a restriction on how many continuous days you can stay, some do not - but to be legal, you must have a residence other than the holiday home.

Many people do live successfully full time on leisure sites, and this can work very well on the smaller sites which fly under the radar. The problem comes either when the owner no longer wants to keep running the site and it changes hands, or when somebody complains to the council and the site owner is given an enforcement notice.

I keep stressing this point as there are numerous and ongoing sad tales of people thinking they could live on a holiday site who discovered they could not and - with no true home to return to - end up in a very distressing situation. Caravan sites (holiday and residential) are big business nowadays, and the first thing new management will do is look to see which pitches they can reclaim in order to redevelop.

 

PaulB:  Site fees will not include Council Tax, it will be a percentage of the business rates applicable to the site. And you have raised a very important point in that there is no legislative control over ground rent increases or changes to terms and conditions on holiday sites.

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