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Durbanite

Tesla cars and fire!

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Seems that if a Tesla car catches on fire it can damage the environment quite considerably.   See https://jalopnik. com/watch-volunteer-firefighters-in-austria-extinguish-a-fi-1819665352  and https://www. tesla. com/en_GB/firstresponders?redirect=no   A bit of a concern I would think especially if on a car or caravan park.  

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The same can be said for all electric vehicles, not just Tesla.

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12 minutes ago, Durbanite said:

Seems that if a Tesla car catches on fire it can damage the environment quite considerably.   See https://jalopnik. com/watch-volunteer-firefighters-in-austria-extinguish-a-fi-1819665352  and https://www. tesla. com/en_GB/firstresponders?redirect=no   A bit of a concern I would think especially if on a car or caravan park.  

Lithium batteries used are just the same as your phone, your laptop etc. The danger to the environment is not greater than a car fuel tank leaking. The emergency services are trained to deal with these relatively new issues.

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19 minutes ago, AJGalaxy2012 said:

Lithium batteries used are just the same as your phone, your laptop etc. The danger to the environment is not greater than a car fuel tank leaking. The emergency services are trained to deal with these relatively new issues.

It seems that the batteries give off more noxious fumes than any petrol or diesel fire?  It also states that up to 3000 gallons of water are required to extinguish a single EV fire.   I would have thought that foam or water mist would be used to smother an electrical fire?

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Just now, Durbanite said:

It seems that the batteries give off more noxious fumes than any petrol or diesel fire?  It also states that up to 3000 gallons of water are required to extinguish a single EV fire.   I would have thought that foam or water mist would be used to smother an electrical fire?

You never use water on an electrical fire.  

Used for Classes A & B fires. Foam spray extinguishers are not recommended for fires involving electricity, but are safer than water if inadvertently sprayed onto live electrical apparatus. Dry Powder Fire Extinguishers: Often termed the 'multi-purpose' extinguisher, as it can be used on classes A, B & C fires.

 

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6 minutes ago, Sparkie240 said:

You never use water on an electrical fire.  

Used for Classes A & B fires. Foam spray extinguishers are not recommended for fires involving electricity, but are safer than water if inadvertently sprayed onto live electrical apparatus. Dry Powder Fire Extinguishers: Often termed the 'multi-purpose' extinguisher, as it can be used on classes A, B & C fires.

 

Lithium battery fires are the exception, the prime difference being that the fire is self contained, rather like a firework, not needing an additional oxygen source, all the combustion ingredients being already inside the battery, so dry powder or foam have little or no effect.

Although water increases the rate of the reaction, it is needed to simply carry away the heat which would cause the fire to spread to other cells.

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5 hours ago, Durbanite said:

Seems that if a Tesla car catches on fire it can damage the environment quite considerably.   See https://jalopnik. com/watch-volunteer-firefighters-in-austria-extinguish-a-fi-1819665352  and https://www. tesla. com/en_GB/firstresponders?redirect=no   A bit of a concern I would think especially if on a car or caravan park.  

 

Guy at our storage is towing a caravan with his Model X  . . Buy all accounts he's quite happy 

5 hours ago, Durbanite said:

Seems that if a Tesla car catches on fire it can damage the environment quite considerably.   See https://jalopnik. com/watch-volunteer-firefighters-in-austria-extinguish-a-fi-1819665352  and https://www. tesla. com/en_GB/firstresponders?redirect=no   A bit of a concern I would think especially if on a car or caravan park.  

 

Electrical insulation and other plastics on ICE vehicles are very toxic when burning and don't touch them after they've cooled .

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The problem with Lithium - as already stated - is that it is self feeding. As a result unless there is risk to others or property the Fire Service will stand and watch it burn - much the safest option.

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Tesla have been slated in the motoring press for unreliability issues of late, along with LandRover / Jaguar.

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11 minutes ago, compact said:

Tesla have been slated in the motoring press for unreliability issues of late, along with LandRover / Jaguar.

 

What was the JLR issue, must have missed that?

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21 hours ago, MHE said:

 

What was the JLR issue, must have missed that?

Poor reliability, from memory Tesla were bottom of the reliability tables with Landrover just above them, I cannot remember where Jaguar featured.  

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Poor electronics can make any car unreliable.

There is little to go wrong with the electric motors.

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Tesla build electric cars, rather than good cars that happen to be electric!

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Lipo batteries can be smothered with dry sand.   they can also be contained in a fire bag/ blanket/ but i would think it would need tobe alot of sand or a big bag. but they are working on it. i. e  wrapping the battery in  a concealed fireproof blanket.

As said it doesnot stop the fire but contain it until it burns itself out

Edited by smino0_1

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6 hours ago, smino0_1 said:

Lipo batteries can be smothered with dry sand.   they can also be contained in a fire bag/ blanket/ but i would think it would need tobe alot of sand or a big bag. but they are working on it. i. e  wrapping the battery in  a concealed fireproof blanket.

As said it doesnot stop the fire but contain it until it burns itself out

Its extremely difficult to contain a LiPo fire, heres a video of a model aircraft battery in a LiPo bag, theres no stopping it. ...

 

 

https://www. jbrov. co. uk/photo/lipofire/LiPo fire tests - HD 720p [File2HD. com] - Copy(1).mp4

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Had three members of our flying club have LiPo battery fires.

 

One took the end of a shed out, one took place in a garage but he managed to throw it out onto his drive using a shovel and the other down at the field, all spectacular apparently.

 

In each case it was down to incorrect settings on programmable chargers.

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1 hour ago, Griff said:

Had three members of our flying club have LiPo battery fires.

 

One took the end of a shed out, one took place in a garage but he managed to throw it out onto his drive using a shovel and the other down at the field, all spectacular apparently.

 

In each case it was down to incorrect settings on programmable chargers.

Very rare that they do go up but when they do. ..............

 

Its not only during use either, one of the students on our course had a small single cell LiPo in his office drawer, been there 6 months untouched, one lunchtime his office drawer caught fire, the LiPo had gone up.

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13 minutes ago, AJGalaxy2012 said:

Very rare that they do go up but when they do. ..............

 

Its not only during use either, one of the students on our course had a small single cell LiPo in his office drawer, been there 6 months untouched, one lunchtime his office drawer caught fire, the LiPo had gone up.

 

Yes has always concerned me some sort of spontaneous combustion.

 

Got 10 model aircraft in my garage, 7 glow/petrol and 3 electrics.

 

The non electrics are stored with their NiMH receiver batteries in situ, assumed rightly or wrongly that they are safe(r). :unsure:

 

The LipPo packs are stored in an ammunition container along with my heafty model car LiPo's hope fully safe there but our eBike batteries are just stored in sleeves under my bench.  :o

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2 hours ago, AJGalaxy2012 said:

Very rare that they do go up but when they do. ..............

 

Its not only during use either, one of the students on our course had a small single cell LiPo in his office drawer, been there 6 months untouched, one lunchtime his office drawer caught fire, the LiPo had gone up.

Most likely, other clutter in the drawer creating a short circuit.

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1 hour ago, Stevan said:

Most likely, other clutter in the drawer creating a short circuit.

Not at all, this type of single cell battery has a socket on the end of it, nigh on impossible to short it out.

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