Jump to content

Caravan showers, time to make them optional ?


Recommended Posts

The problem is that those who bang on about not wanting showers and full ovens etc. , don’t buy the caravans when a manufacturer responds to that wish. Swift tried it a handful of years ago, but sales were very poor indeed, so. ...........

  • Like 3

1958 Morris Minor towing 2012 Hobby Landhaus

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 212
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

We have a rear bathroom with proper sized sink and shower, I use all the bathroom facilities in the van for everything, shower, number 2's, having a shave, the lot. The wife uses the campsite faciliti

No ! I would not buy a caravan without a full shower cubicle . 

A shower is not really an optional add in item, not like a mover or Tyron bands which can readily be fitted to pretty much any van. Adding or removing the shower would represent a significant re-desi

Posted Images

I've been thinking about posting in a slightly different way. My take on it would be that if the shower cubicle was left out,it would leave more room for longer,wider beds and possibly seating. Most of the popular fixed bed layouts are compromised by the need to accommodate a shower cubicle. Many claim not to use the shower,some the toilet as well. Would there be any interest in what would basically be a bedsit on wheels,perhaps with only rudimentary cooking and ablution facilities as well,since some claim to do little cooking inside?Such a van needn't necessarily be a basic stripped out affair,it could be quite luxurious in terms of sleeping and sitting. Personally,I like to be self sufficient and everything except the TV aerial and microwave get used in ours,but appreciate we're all different.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

We wouldn't buy a caravan without a shower. Even on sites with full facilities we often use the vans facilities. Plus we rally with no site facilities. To us a shower is essential and we wouldn't even look at a caravan without one.

 

  • Like 1

David

Nissan X-Trail Adventura KIA Sorento & Elddis Affinity 554

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's always struck me as odd that the top Bailey range, the Unicorns outsell the rest of their range. Most of of their ranges have most of the things that are in Unicorns, just slightly more basic. Given that most vans only get used a few weeks of the year you'd think the cheaper ranges would be more popular. But as said, practicality goes out the big front window.

  • Like 1

I've got nothing to do on this hot afternoon

but to settle down and write you a line.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Even amongst those who would opt out of the shower I recon there would be a split between those who want extra storage and those who would rather save length and therefore weight! 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, James Donald said:

And not every Caravan owners has to worry about every pound weight so they can tow with an underpowered smokey deisel! 

Most of the diesels on here won’t be underpowered or smokey, in fact most of the newer ones are cleaner than petrols. As for underpowered I’m quite happy with my 336 hp, 700nm smokey underpowered diesel. 😂

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, nigel207 said:

The problem is that those who bang on about not wanting showers and full ovens etc. , don’t buy the caravans when a manufacturer responds to that wish. Swift tried it a handful of years ago, but sales were very poor indeed, so. ...........

 

This is it in a nutshell; for the UK market, several times minimalist vans have been brought out to test our market and failed to sell sufficiently to endure as products, despite the success  of such lines with our foreign cousins.

In shelling out tens of thousands of pounds we want an autonomous van, it's being purchased for more than use on full facility sites, in guaranteed dry weather, in the main season and mainly for the one family holiday. The evidence seems to be we are not alone and whilst some don't want this autonomous ability, they don't at present shell out in sufficient numbers to make their desired product viable.  

 

Probably things are about to change; we who use vans as we do are falling off the perch and the upcoming buyers probably want to holiday differently, even just to be different and "cool".

Plus, there are coming immense pressures to build something very much lighter and smaller  with lower drag to suit the vehicles  we are being pressured to own.

Get used to a "trailer tent" in some heavily restyled cool form, with no room for a shower and little more than a chamber pot with pull round curtain, for "emergencies".

 

 

Edited by JTQ
Link to post
Share on other sites

I think what we have to accept is that caravan/motorhome manufacturers try to appeal to the widest customer base with their various models. Even if 10% of customers preferred not to have showers it leaves 90% wanting them even if they don't use them. At some point we have to sell/trade in our leisure vehicle and even if you have no use for a shower the thought is bound to cross your mind that you would be restricting the opportunities for selling it on. I do wonder if people who suggest these things are not included in their chosen LV ever think about the resell value. Try selling a house without a bathroom!!!

 

David

David - Milton Keynes

Bailey Alliance 66-2 Motorhome for holidays and a Kia Venga for home.

 

Caravan Travels

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Steamdrivenandy said:

It's always struck me as odd that the top Bailey range, the Unicorns outsell the rest of their range. Most of of their ranges have most of the things that are in Unicorns, just slightly more basic. Given that most vans only get used a few weeks of the year you'd think the cheaper ranges would be more popular. But as said, practicality goes out the big front window.

 

For 95% of buyers of new caravans its yet another recreational toy.

Like a boat or a holiday home the buyer is buying a dream.

Hence all the boats bobbing around in the marina on a good sailing day.

All those statics motorhomes and caravans unused for 46 plus weeks in the year.

Caravans are designed to be used 90 days in 365 maximum.

So when you are buying recreational dreams logic goes out the window😀

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

That's why I've gone back to a 5.2m campervan that I can use whenever Mrs SDA  has the car. It has a proper Thetford toilet, no shower, a fridge, gas hobs, two 7ft single beds, or a double, four belted seats and loads of storage lockers plus a 3ft deep rear 'boot. 

 

Small enough to go anywhere we want but big enough to sleep in. Not everybody's ideal but it works for us.

I've got nothing to do on this hot afternoon

but to settle down and write you a line.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Could you add microwave and oven to the list of options like the European vans ? No shower would you need hot water heater then ?

 

 

Dave

 

 

 

Edited by CommanderDave

Jeep Commander 3. 0 V6 CRD

Isuzu D- Max Utah Auto

Elddis Crusader Storm 2000 Kgs, Unipart Royal Atlas Mover .

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Easy T said:

If you don't fit a shower then what do you replace it with? Storage? Is there really sufficient payload for useful storage?  

 

Doesn’t that take us full circle to consider the Miro and the MTPLM, but that would depend on which plate you look at, the one in the locker or the one stuck to the side of the caravan. 😂😂😂😂😂

Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe the OP should look at a continental van where if Hymer is typical there was a very lengthy factory options list.

 

Ovens, heating technology, underfloor heating, aircon systems, fabrics, mattress construction, ATC, carpets, berths, external colour, external shower, radio, subwoofer, built in TV and my favourite chassis load rating.

These are but a few I recall, but as the list ran to several pages I suspect I have omitted more than I have recalled.

 

It does mean a cultural change from walking into and out of a showroom with ones "bespoke" van, and probably using a dealer over there, but they can be obtained built to your specification in 6 to 8 months.

 

 

 

Edited by JTQ
Changed "is" to "was" as it is 12 years since we sorted ours.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Even the Hymer options list doesn't feature a shower cubicle. Though as said earlier, they do produce vans where the layout doesn't feature a washroom and in the Eriba Touring range, even when there is a washroom in the layout, the shower fittings are a cost option. 

  • I do not understand 1

I've got nothing to do on this hot afternoon

but to settle down and write you a line.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The thought that if they sold a van without a shower then it would have a greater payload.  Is fancifull, The makes fit the lowest rated axle they can get away with because it saves them  money.   

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, fred said:

The thought that if they sold a van without a shower then it would have a greater payload.  Is fancifull, The makes fit the lowest rated axle they can get away with because it saves them  money.   

The weight saving from omitting the shower would be pretty minimal anyway, probably less than the weight of putting anything else in its place!

Incidentally what would folk want in place of the shower?

Bigger beds?

Wet locker?

Extra wardrobe?

Shorter lighter van?

Something else?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of the Hobbies and other caravans used by travellers do not have showers fitted

 

Edited by w44nty
edit

2013 Bailey Unicorn Cadiz  pulled by a Landrover Freelander 2 / VW Passat Estate 2.0 Blue Motion

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Steamdrivenandy said:

It's always struck me as odd that the top Bailey range, the Unicorns outsell the rest of their range. Most of of their ranges have most of the things that are in Unicorns, just slightly more basic. Given that most vans only get used a few weeks of the year you'd think the cheaper ranges would be more popular. But as said, practicality goes out the big front window.

 

Thats a very good point indeed and one that has puzzled me as well.  

 

 My pal bought a new Bailey Unicorn “Cabrera” this time last year, I collect my Bailey Phoenix tomorrow almost 12 months to the day since he got his.

 

 Both vans use the same body shell, the internal layout is identical, both have ATC, mine as one of a number of Dealer extras, and his as standard, the Cabrera has Alde heating whereas mine has blown air, his has central locking,  mine is manual, both have microwaves, a cooker, a fridge, SHOWER, etc,  the furnishings are a bit “plusher” in his.

 

So in effect they are, for all intents and purposes, identical caravans that do exactly the same thing in the same way, HOWEVER, and here’s the surprising part, I paid six THOUSAND pounds LESS than he did 12 months ago!  Which goes to demonstrate that  Steamdrivenandy has got it absolutely right!!  

 

As confirmation to some extent. .......

 I changed my car this time last year, I replaced like model for like model, however I didn’t even CONSIDER getting anything other than the absolute top of the range version (used not new!) I sometimes ask myself  why it had to be the “dogs danglies” version and come up with a number of reasons, or should be read justifications??  

 

Because I wanted all the toys (adaptive cruise control being one of the best) I like the “quality” of the seating and interior trim, I like automatics (especially for towing!) along with a number of other “justifications” and probably most pertinent, it’s my money so I choose how to spend it. My pal on the other hand is happy with a Transit crewcab van as his “car” So which of us is “wrong” or even right? Neither of course, like most things in life it’s down to personal choice again.  

 

Andy

9 hours ago, Grandpa Steve said:

 

Doesn’t that take us full circle to consider the Miro and the MTPLM, but that would depend on which plate you look at, the one in the locker or the one stuck to the side of the caravan. 😂😂😂😂😂

 

Nice one!!! :D

 

Andy

  • Like 1

Experience is an awful teacher who ends up sending you simply horrifying bills

Link to post
Share on other sites

We've never used the shower in any of our vans other than for hanging wet coats/clothes or towels, storing the dirty washing bag and it's also where the aquaroll and wastemaster live when not being used.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I owned a Fendt that although it had a shower  arrangement and a curtain  around the toilet compartment  we never used it and could see that drying up afterwards would have been more trouble than it was worth. I currently have a Lunar with a perfectly functional shower (I know that because we tried it once) but we only use it as storage for light bulky items like the washing machine. As we always use site facilities its of no interest to us whether fitted or not but I could say the same about the gas oven. .

David

Various vans 78-2019,  currently  Hobby Excellent 540 FU and Mercedes E220 CDI Estate

www. caravan-europe. co. uk

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, klyne said:

I think what we have to accept is that caravan/motorhome manufacturers try to appeal to the widest customer base with their various models. Even if 10% of customers preferred not to have showers it leaves 90% wanting them even if they don't use them. At some point we have to sell/trade in our leisure vehicle and even if you have no use for a shower the thought is bound to cross your mind that you would be restricting the opportunities for selling it on. I do wonder if people who suggest these things are not included in their chosen LV ever think about the resell value. Try selling a house without a bathroom!!!

 

David

 

As said a number of European caravans are sold as "dry " caravans and have no bathroom and they use the site facilities instead on sites but a house with no bathroom would rely on neighbours bathrooms . Even other facilities in caravans and motorhomes in European models is minimal with just three ring hob and small sink and minimal size fridge and if the same model is sold into the UK market it will come with larger fridge and oven .

 

It is the UK market that requires all the goodies and luxuries but comes with lower payloads .

 

My German motorhome sold in Europe has a 750 kg payload here the same model is down to 600 kg .

 

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave

Jeep Commander 3. 0 V6 CRD

Isuzu D- Max Utah Auto

Elddis Crusader Storm 2000 Kgs, Unipart Royal Atlas Mover .

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, micktheshed said:

Caravan manufactures have one aim in mind: to sell caravans.

Basic 'vans do not appeal, or sell, to many people, so they don't get made in any meaningful quantities. It's that simple; the market dictates. There's also (dare I say it?) not as much profit in them!

How many of you actually use the oven, or the microwave, let alone the shower? I suspect that most use the shower much more than the other two put together.

Having said that I'll be the first to admit that I don't like  carting around things that don't get used, hence the microwave (all 10Kg dead weight)  will live in my loft until sale time LOL.

Our first new caravan didn't have a shower, just a small washroom with space for a porta-potti (not supplied). We joined the owners' club and started going on rallies where there were no facilities other than a stand pipe and wast point. On longer rallies we used occasionally use the showers in other member's caravans and vowed that our next van would have a shower and proper loo. It took five years by eventually we were able to upgrade to model that had a fully fitted and usable washroom, and joy of joys, an oven too - luxury.

We regularly use the shower, the oven and the microwave in our present outfit, and that most unacceptable pastime for outdoor types, the television. With the advantage of a built in generator, and bearing in mind that some people are always looking for a reason to be offended, by considerate use of the genny we can use all electrical appliances when "off grid".  I don't think a trip goes by where shower, oven and microwave are not used several times.

As for the mobile phone - well we're on holiday - so that is generally turned off for the duration.

13 minutes ago, Llew said:

We've never used the shower in any of our vans other than for hanging wet coats/clothes or towels, storing the dirty washing bag and it's also where the aquaroll and wastemaster live when not being used.

So you do use the shower compartment, just not for showering in ;)

I accept that it's all down to personal choice but as has been pointed out several times, caravans with showers sell in greater numbers than those without, and that fact will be reflected in the trade in price when it's time to change your caravan.

Gordon.

29 minutes ago, David in Cheshire said:

I owned a Fendt that although it had a shower  arrangement and a curtain  around the toilet compartment  we never used it and could see that drying up afterwards would have been more trouble than it was worth. 

We resolved that problem by asking for a window to be fitted in the toilet compartment from new, so that after showering the soggy curtain could hung out of the window to dry, leaving the loo compartment usable by others.

Our later models had rigid shower screens which while more convenient whilst showering, still had to be wiped dry after use.

Gordon.

  • Like 1

Fourwinds Hurricane 31D Motorhome. Also MGTF135 1. 8i Roadster (fun) & Volvo V70 3.2Ltr LPG (everyday car)
Unless otherwise stated, my posts will be my personal thoughts and have the same standing as any other member of Caravan Talk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ours is now an older caravan and has a toilet shower combination so no lost space and as we prefer to use our own facilities rather than traipsing to the community ones its a ideal for us.

 

 

Paul B

. .......Mondeo Estate & Elddis Avanté 505 (Tobago)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Our first van must have been one of the last absolutely basic models available, It was a Avondale Perle Argos, 1991 iirc we bought it in 2003.  It had a compartment for a porta potti did have a flip down sink. I didn’t have a shower hot water or even a battery charger.    Second van had a combined toilet and shower wet room. The only reason we changed after 7 years was to get a van with a separate shower an end bathroom, which is exactly the same as the current van.  I can’t remember the last time I used a site showers was at least three years ago.   I like my luxuries even when we are in a field with a standpipe and hole in the ground to dump the elsan.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

My first caravan in the 60s a Sprite had nothing with no toilet, shower, hot water, oven, electric or 12 v just a two burner hob and gas mantles for lighting and a foot pump. But you never had to worry of things going wrong and we actually interacted with each other in conversation .

 

 

 

Dave

Edited by CommanderDave
  • Like 2

Jeep Commander 3. 0 V6 CRD

Isuzu D- Max Utah Auto

Elddis Crusader Storm 2000 Kgs, Unipart Royal Atlas Mover .

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...