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Mark&Penny14

Vinyl Wrapping

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I have seen a lot on the internet about vinyl wrapping on cars to protect the paintwork, now given the delicate issue of aluminium being damaged and some of the grp  panels suffering from cracking and UV damage, I wondered if it would be viable to wrap a van, colour choices are endless or you could just have clear, I used Pannier protection film on my bike and SWMBO never managed to damage the paint underneath no matter how many times she kicked it😂.  

 

I saw saw the car below just outside overstrand in Norfolk a couple of years ago, not my taste but just shows what can be done.  

 

6B6862FC-D880-427D-A107-81A2F1628CCE.jpeg.12801a11bdf4fe6a883ef5bc54d2561a.jpeg

Edited by Mark&Penny14

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I know nothing about wrapping but as in most things in life if you can afford it it probably can be done.

 

I can't see a lot of difference between wrapping a car with complex curves and wrapping a van,in fact a van seems the easier of the two options.

 

Someone somewhere must surely have done it.

 

Ian

 

 

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No doubt there would be some issues with chemical damage from the plasticiser and or the adhesive to fix it after a prolonged spell.

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An old thread resurrected earlier today.

A

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saw a program on  TV about wrapping cars and it does not last a life time, I cant recall how long they said but not more then 5 years

 

macafee2

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I think it was Wheeler dealers where he bought a previous wrapped car from a Racing Circuit

 

The wrap was in a very poor condition, but it did come off quite cleanly

 

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On 04/12/2018 at 14:48, joanie said:

 

I assume the plastic is there to protect the paint, which is there to protect the steel.

But what protects the plastic?

Perhaps there is something we could do for that? :-o       :-))

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4 hours ago, daveat92 said:

I assume the plastic is there to protect the paint, which is there to protect the steel.

But what protects the plastic?

Perhaps there is something we could do for that? :-o       :-))

 

Sorry I think you are missing the point, wrapping is nothing to do with protecting the paintwork / bodywork. Wrapping is nothing more than a style choice (a short term option), the sort of people who "wrap" cars have no interest in the long term. That probably doesn't sit well with a typical subscriber to this forum but it is very much a way of life for many other (younger) people.   There is no financial rationale for wrapping, people do it because it produces a result they like and they can afford it.    

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I thought wrapping was some sort of dance :D

  • Haha 1

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46 minutes ago, Les Medes said:

I thought wrapping was some sort of dance :D

Les that’s Rapping 😂

I actually thought it gave protection as I originally said I had a clear film on my bike panniers and it gave a lot of protection from the damage that boots can do as they collide with them when getting on and off the bike.  

Edited by Mark&Penny14

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10 hours ago, jetA1 said:

 

Sorry I think you are missing the point, wrapping is nothing to do with protecting the paintwork / bodywork. Wrapping is nothing more than a style choice (a short term option), the sort of people who "wrap" cars have no interest in the long term. That probably doesn't sit well with a typical subscriber to this forum but it is very much a way of life for many other (younger) people.   There is no financial rationale for wrapping, people do it because it produces a result they like and they can afford it.    

 

Wrapping does give some panel protection against stones and brambles.

 

I had my new car polished and ceramic coated when new, it has helped keep it looking pristine - I suspect a caravan body flexes too much to use ceramics.

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1 hour ago, Black Grouse said:

 

Wrapping does give some panel protection against stones and brambles.

 

I had my new car polished and ceramic coated when new, it has helped keep it looking pristine - I suspect a caravan body flexes too much to use ceramics.

 

But vinyl wrapping is not the same a ceramic coating, brambles could tear the vinyl wrapping, and ceramic coating doesn't stop scratches or stone chips.

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21 minutes ago, Grandpa Steve said:

 

But vinyl wrapping is not the same a ceramic coating, brambles could tear the vinyl wrapping, and ceramic coating doesn't stop scratches or stone chips.

 

The wrapping becomes a sacrificial layer - ceramic coating does stop minor scratches and stone chips, well mine has but it was done professionally.

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Another good use for it would be to wrap the internal locker doors to give a gloss finish similar to most caravan manufacturers top of the range offerings . ..

Would update the interior greatly :)

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That looks better than most new Vans!

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I had a (blue) estate car that was written off after 10 months of ownership. I had searched long and hard for that car, and was upset when I had it taken away. In the intervening months, there was nothing else blue available in my choice of car. Only grey (in its many forms), black and white. Now, as SWMBO tells me, I have no colour sense, but I didn't want a grey car. White would have been like an ambulance, black would have been like a hearse.

 

So I bought a white one. I had the roof, tailgate spoiler and diffuser wrapped gloss black (along with black wheels and radiator grilles). I think it looked nice. The job was immaculate. The vinyl was guaranteed for a very long time. The fitter advised against using cheap car washes that used TFR and to treat the vinyl as I would paint. I ignored the first part of his advice. It still looked good and shiny 5 years later when I sold it.

I don't think it would have stood up to stone chips, but it was decorative rather than protective.

As with most things, there is a right and wrong way to wrap. My chap came highly recommended and was kind enough to let me into some of the tricks of his trade.

 

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16 hours ago, AlwynMike said:

 White would have been like an ambulance, black would have been like a hearse.

While I've owned both the "ambulance" and the "hearse" . . .

1987 Volvo 240 DL.jpg2007 Volvo V70 Est.jpg

. . . like you my preference has always been for a real colour.

2004 MGTF.jpg

1995 MGF.jpg

 

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3 hours ago, Gordon said:

While I've owned both the "ambulance" and the "hearse" . . .

. . . like you my preference has always been for a real colour.

 

Bronze Yellow. aka baby pooh brown. Classic '70s with a soundtrack to match.

IMG_20150611_120608_zps5of2mqin.jpg

 

Edit: The V8 has got a towbar, and has been used to tow a caravan. Not the best towcar in the world though!

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Nice motors AlwynMike.

Staying (briefly) on topic, I think that wrapping a car would provide better protection overall than the water based "colour of no substance" we have on cars today, in place of "real" paint. As for the colours, well I'd be the first to admit that "Harvest Gold" was not the most attractive of colours for our 70s Mini but at least it had a decent thickness of paint with an undercoat of a similar colour. The black Volvo in my previous post has a white undercoat. I wonder who though that was a good idea, as the slightest scratch sticks out like a sore thumb?

Gordon.

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7 minutes ago, Gordon said:

Nice motors AlwynMike.

Staying (briefly) on topic, I think that wrapping a car would provide better protection overall than the water based "colour of no substance" we have on cars today, in place of "real" paint. As for the colours, well I'd be the first to admit that "Harvest Gold" was not the most attractive of colours for our 70s Mini but at least it had a decent thickness of paint with an undercoat of a similar colour. The black Volvo in my previous post has a white undercoat. I wonder who though that was a good idea, as the slightest scratch sticks out like a sore thumb?

Gordon.

Gordon

Surely you remember the cars of the 60s, 70s and 80s where every other car on the roads had visible surface rust? Today's paint may scratch easily and every scratch shows but truly rusty cars are now a relative rarity on our roads.

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