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Electric Bikes which one etc.

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35 minutes ago, klyne said:

 It worries me when I read that people have difficulty getting started on a bike, electric or otherwise. An electric bike is no more difficult to get started on than a push bike. If that is difficult I do wonder if an electric bike is really the best option? I appreciate the OP is looking into this very comprehensively but think of the real use and then decide on the bike.

 

David

I have always felt starting is the most difficult part of riding, specially if the chain comes off just as one is cocking leg over the saddle, brings tears to my eyes just thinking about it.

 

Today I no longer stand on the pedal to propel my body over the seat on starting, not fit enough for that, the pedal reaches bottom before I am over and pushing on pedal on other side, not sure that would work at all with an electric bike the torque assist would actually hinder not help. Today I lean bike over and get on it before trying to start, and putting all one's weight on the pedal only to find it will either not go down, or go down that slowly you can't balance is a very real problem.

 

I learnt to ride with an epicyclic gear box, where I could stop in top, then switch it to first and back pedal, the derail system engineering seems daft, however clearly it works, but even that has moved on, gone are the days when you had to feel the gears go in, it is now a simple up and down button, on wife's old bike, or twist grip on my old bike. But never the less, not being able to change gear when stopped means starting can be a challenge.  

 

For those who ride daily I am sure it becomes second nature, but even when riding once a week on average I still end up in wrong gear or changing too late so chain is jumping the sprocket. This late changing also often results in chain coming off, again that can bring water to ones eyes.

 

As to real use, one would like to use it for all things from local shopping to long scenic rides to rides through woodland, there is however a security problem with local shops, and the other two need different tyres. Hitting a pot hole with full suspension and wide mountain bike tyres is not a problem, however speed is much reduced, locking out front suspension and narrow tyres coupled with a light bike makes for speed, but tram lines can be a problem, am I showing my age?

 

To my mind cycling is for enjoyment, it allows me to stop where I want and take pictures, and go places where although my 4 x 4 car may be able to go, I could not legally go, must admit when I ride or walk off the beaten track then found some one has driven a car there I feel it was in vain, told an Austin 7 was driven to top of Snowdon,  but try that today and you end up in court.

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On 25/10/2018 at 12:25, anthdci said:

To be honest for me I love the idea of an e-bike, but I hate the idea of that 15. 5mph

 

Ive fitted a dongle to my Cube Reaction Race ebike which overcomes this restriction. It fools the controller into thinking you are only doing half of your actual road speed, so I now get assistance upto 30mph. I fitted this as I disliked the 15mph cut off.

 

Of course doing this means your bike is classed as a vehicle and you have to register and insure it just like a car or motorbike.

 

 

Cube.jpg

Edited by LeadFarmer

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On 27/10/2018 at 11:17, ancell said:

I am toying with electrifying my self built trike- tadpole configuration suspension all round SRAM 7x3 rear hub x triple ring front=63 ratios glassfibre steel&fabric construction.

Folds for flights to foreign parts.

16000 plus miles in 12 countries so far.

250 watts legally is no good to me so I would be upping the power and probably using LiPo batteries.

Is there a state of the art hub motor out there? Does it matter? Eg brushless vs brushed.

Have a look on Aliexpress or Banggood, great choice of conversion kits.   Mine has a very beefy motor but a controller that can limit it to 250w when I need to be road legal, 3000w available at other times for fun! The battery gives it 50 miles plus range all fitted to a Claude Butler folding bike.

 

 

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Re FREEGO:-

 

It is with great regret, that FreeGo Electric Bikes Limited has ceased trading and will soon be going into liquidation

For any enquiries, please contact the administrator below

Matthew Vanderman, RSM Restructuring Advisory LLP

023 8064 6420, matthew. vanderman@rsmuk. com

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Starting to do my homework as I am in the Market for an E Bike. Like Leadfarmers but they come at a price. My Budget is minimum £1000, max £1500 and want a road racer type bike and not one of those going to the shops folding ebikes. I take it you can buy a system that kicks in at certain low speeds and cuts out again when you speed up again ? This way I'm still getting my exercise miles in.  Max round trip will be 60 miles as I want to use it for my work recharging battery at my place of work for the return journey. Any ideas ? Have a cycle to work scheme but don't know if it covers Ebikes . ..

 

GAS, . ....;) 

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Ours "assists" from the moment you start loading and turning the pedals and cuts out assisting when the bike's road speed is 25 kph about 15. 5 mph. That level of assistance in our case, can be three quite widely spaced levels, and you can switch it off so do all the work. The assist characteristic is "profiled" giving a good take off shove and no cliff edge cut out at 25 kph. Moving between levels is a touch button function.

So, therefore ours senses your applied torque, and your cadence; we have no throttle function at all.

Since a few years back full range throttles were stopped on legally sold new bikes that you can use as a conventional bike, as opposed to a "motorbike/moped" electric bike. A get away throttle function is allowed up to 4 kph. As said ours has not  this as a physical device, but much of that get away throttle's function is embedded in the  algorithm  of the pedal load and cadence to motor output.

Ours is a crank drive, so the electric drive can exploit the bikes gears. Useful if used in hilly areas.

 

You can still get a good work out, how much depends on your choice of assistance mode; then with the weight of these things, switch the assist off and you really will get all the work out you could want!

 

 

Edited by JTQ
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On 27/01/2019 at 11:59, TedNewman said:

Re FREEGO:-

 

It is with great regret, that FreeGo Electric Bikes Limited has ceased trading and will soon be going into liquidation

For any enquiries, please contact the administrator below

Matthew Vanderman, RSM Restructuring Advisory LLP

023 8064 6420, matthew. vanderman@rsmuk. com

Such a shame, as I really rate the quality of my folder. There may be some bargains out there at the moment, but obviously no warranties.  

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My Volt Metro LS is similar to Glens Freego.

It is UK, EU spec and totally legal to ride in the UK and the EU. I was not a cheap purchase, after the battery upgrade and the dual on/off road tyres.

A good website is. https://www. pedelecs. co. uk/ (I have nothing to do with it apart from being a user!)

It will give you all the information to whats legal and to whats not, with the current legislation?

happy hunting, the Volt is my second eBike, the first was an import that got recalled, because it had a 400w motor?

I have this style as I have 2 artificial knees and find it hard to get over the cross bar of my Specialized Stumpjumper?

Edited by David P
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Mine is a Volt Alpine X and as I bought it in 2015, it has a thumb throttle which is live in all modes so if I get into a problem with pedalling my left thumb takes over.  :)

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12 hours ago, David P said:

. ........... and find it hard to get over the cross bar of my Specialized Stumpjumper?

 

I have a problem with getting my leg over so to speak and need the saddle to be at its lowest point to swing my leg over.

 

Once on, the saddle is then too low to pedal effectively and my ride position looked more like a kids monkey bike.

 

My wife recently took delivery of a Giant eBike and that came with a 'saddle dropper post', not seen one before.

 

I decided to buy one for my electric mountain bike and now mount it with the saddle down then once underway with the flick of a switch the saddle rises to its ride height, problem solved, not the reason proper mountain bikers have them though.  ;)

 

 

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As someone who has had electric bikes for a while now I would just add one comment.

 

Be sure to get one where the motor is either in the crank or in the back wheel and NOT in the front wheel.  When you are “under power” and turning the the handlebars if the front wheel encounters a bit of gravel, a manhole cover/railway track/patch of diesel there is more than enough power for the front wheel to lose grip and slip sideways. The only outcome of that is going to be costly and probably painful :wub:

 

Its a simple fact and one I didn’t think of until. ............ Well you can guess can’t you??

 

My current EAPC is rear wheel drive!

 

Andy

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8 hours ago, Mr Plodd said:

As someone who has had electric bikes for a while now I would just add one comment.

 

Be sure to get one where the motor is either in the crank or in the back wheel and NOT in the front wheel.  When you are “under power” and turning the the handlebars if the front wheel encounters a bit of gravel, a manhole cover/railway track/patch of diesel there is more than enough power for the front wheel to lose grip and slip sideways. The only outcome of that is going to be costly and probably painful :wub:

 

Its a simple fact and one I didn’t think of until. ............ Well you can guess can’t you??

 

My current EAPC is rear wheel drive!

 

Andy

Looked at Halfords and a Brompton, both had front electric hub's, so ended up with the Volt, and very happy with it, 11 months on!

Edited by David P

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Decided on this Steed. Orbea Gain road bike. Tyres to be changed to either Conti's or kevlar lined .   Free service thrown in . Its like buying a motor. ..🙄

20190212_134407.jpg

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25 minutes ago, Grumpy Auld Smeesh said:

Decided on this Steed. Orbea Gain road bike. Tyres to be changed to either Conti's or kevlar lined .   Free service thrown in . Its like buying a motor. ..🙄

20190212_134407.jpg

Nice ride. I assume the battery slides out of the bottom of the down tube? Can it then be charged or does the bike need to be taken to the electrical supply?

I would go with the Kevlar tyres, if you have tubes get some slime or tubes with slime, that's what I have!

No good for me as it has a cross bar! But I do like it, not over the top £. Our local cycle shop has a Trek in the window £6. 5k, down from £7250 I would by a motor bike?

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29 minutes ago, David P said:

Nice ride. I assume the battery slides out of the bottom of the down tube? Can it then be charged or does the bike need to be taken to the electrical supply?

I would go with the Kevlar tyres, if you have tubes get some slime or tubes with slime, that's what I have!

No good for me as it has a cross bar! But I do like it, not over the top £. Our local cycle shop has a Trek in the window £6. 5k, down from £7250 I would by a motor bike?

 

Actually you have a point on the battery location and one I shall discuss on Thursday. The battery is inside the down tube  but forgot to ask if and how it can be replaced. Yip the charging point is at the base of the down tube. One multi function colour coded switch on the top tube with blue tooth connectivity to an app on your phone giving you all the relevent information. This is the alloy framed version slightly heavier than the carbon version but the carbon version is nearly another £1000 :blink:. Mrs Smeesh is doing summersaults as it is  with the usual "you already have two bikes" scenario . .. I reminded her of her weekly delivery of clothes to calm the storm. .... Why do wiman never understand  ?? 

 

GAS . ....:rolleyes:

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This  following link I think will give you the charging option and battery replacement;

https://www. bikeradar. com/road/gear/category/bikes/electric/product/orbea-gain-d10-review-51522/

 

Unless they have revisited the design since late Sept 2017, charging requires the bike to be plugged in as the battery is not user removable. A  dealer accessible "hatch" seems to be how a battery change out is done. I note they were talking about a second battery.

Interesting bike, sadly for me not these days my biking usage but I can certainly see the attraction.

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Excellent JTQ. Thanks for the info. Yes think this will do just fine. .  😉  

 

GAS. .😇

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On 12/02/2019 at 08:16, Griff said:

I have a problem with getting my leg over so to speak and need the saddle to be at its lowest point to swing my leg over.

Once on, the saddle is then too low to pedal effectively and my ride position looked more like a kids monkey bike.

Maybe a practical solution would have been to choose a bike with a step through frame?

23 hours ago, Mr Plodd said:

Be sure to get one where the motor is either in the crank or in the back wheel and NOT in the front wheel.  When you are “under power” and turning the the handlebars if the front wheel encounters a bit of gravel, a manhole cover/railway track/patch of diesel there is more than enough power for the front wheel to lose grip and slip sideways.

Whilst I completely agree with your warning if a higher power setting is used on a poor surface, however I deliberately chose a bike with drive to the front wheel because I can then effectively have "two wheel drive". This has proved invaluable in off road situations when negotiating seriously muddy conditions, and where I really don't want to put my feet down.

I have the added advantage of a thumb throttle as this was perfectly legal when purchased, and remains so if fitted as original equipment on older bikes. Some years ago I had the misfortune for someone to run into the rear of my bike, completely destroying the derailleur mechanism. As the bike had a thumb throttle, I was able to tie up the remains of the derailleur arm, and coast home on the throttle; while without this facility, the  alternative would have been a long walk in the rain.

 

When considering electric assistance for bikes, we opted for conversion kits rather than complete bikes, primarily because of price as we already had two perfectly good bikes, and didn't really want to find storage space for two more. Most of the time I ride above the cut off speed of 15mph for the assistance, thus the battery is not being used most of the time but the motor is there to help on inclines (or if just feeling lazy). With continuous assistance in use the battery will last for around 35 miles.

 

I've had my electric conversion since 2013, and my wife's was bought the following year. Both are in daily use and still going strong.

 

For anybody interested I've attached a review I sent to the kit suppliers some years ago in response to their request, where I have noted the issue of front wheel traction that Andy has highlighted.

Cyclotricity review.doc

Edited by Gordon
Added review document

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4 minutes ago, Gordon said:

Maybe a practical solution would have been to choose a bike with a step through frame?

 

Yes Gordon I agree and I did have an AS Bikes folder which was step through, recently sold, but as most rides we now do are off road and rough tracks found the step through, although easier to mount, not really built for those types of terrain, became a bone shaker and without a cross bar risked frame damage.

 

The AS was a great machine for on road and smooth paths such as canal tow paths.

 

 

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Whichever style of Electric bike you decide to buy, pay attention to where the motor is located. If it is on the rear wheel or front wheel, removing that wheel to repair or replace the inner tube in the event of a puncture when out on the road is fraught with frustration due to the cabling to the motor.   My advice is to choose a bike where the motor is situated on the bottom bracket assembly, allowing wheel removal when necessary,  just as you would on a non-electric bike

Edited by bessacarr425
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My Volt Metro LS, is no bone shaker! It has shocks up front, suspension seat post, no match for my stumpjumper, but I am no longer capable of riding it, due to my condition! So my low step works for me?

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11 hours ago, Griff said:

as most rides we now do are off road and rough tracks found the step through, although easier to mount, not really built for those types of terrain, became a bone shaker and without a cross bar risked frame damage.

I take your point. My bike has a low cross bar and the frame certainly has more flexing over rough terrain than a standard bike frame would have.

B'twin 7.jpg

 

As you can see, some local tracks are not accessible all year round.

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On 12 February 2019 at 18:08, Grumpy Auld Smeesh said:

Decided on this Steed. Orbea Gain road bike. Tyres to be changed to either Conti's or kevlar lined .   Free service thrown in . Its like buying a motor. ..🙄

20190212_134407.jpg

 

Well I bought the bike . Same as this but in a gun metal colour. Pick it up Wednesday. Could have got it today but GAS went on the drink last night and broke his 100 day alcohol gap. Still not too bad as I have not had a drink since the 2nd of January. So sitting here full of "The Fear" sobering up... :unsure:... Looking forward to some Big Miles with the aid of this technology... Its the wee pink one at the back by the way....:D

 

GAS ...

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