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cher129

Impact Driver

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Hi all, anyone any advice or experience using an impact driver to raise and lower corner legs. . Been using a Bosch 24v for years but the NiCad battery has now had it and not cost effective to replace. Looking at a Budget Twin pack at a fair price but would the impact driver be of any use instead of the std 18v combi drill thats also in the pack. TIA

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No experience in using one but I would have thought an impact driver is the last thing you need. We're not tightening wheel nuts here, we're just propping up a big empty box.

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Impact drivers operate by a combination of rotation and concussive blows to force fixings through tough materials. They typically deliver two to three times more turning force (torque) than the average drill/driver. I wouldn't have thought winding corner steadies up and down requires that level of power!

Edited by Legal Eagle

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Cheapest possible cordless drill is absolutely fine. No need for the impact driver at all.

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1 hour ago, Stevan said:

Cheapest possible cordless drill is absolutely fine.

 

An impact driver is only required to start a really tight nut or bolt turning.    Corner steadies should never be so tight.    I would suggest a cordless drill supplied with a Lithium-ion battery.    Other types of battery are ok initially but very soon they require frequent recharging.

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4 hours ago, hawkaye said:

No experience in using one but I would have thought an impact driver is the last thing you need. We're not tightening wheel nuts here, we're just propping up a big empty box.

 

2 hours ago, Jaydug said:

 

An impact driver is only required to start a really tight nut or bolt turning.    Corner steadies should never be so tight.    I would suggest a cordless drill supplied with a Lithium-ion battery.    Other types of battery are ok initially but very soon they require frequent recharging.

 

2 hours ago, Jaydug said:

 

An impact driver is only required to start a really tight nut or bolt turning.    Corner steadies should never be so tight.    I would suggest a cordless drill supplied with a Lithium-ion battery.    Other types of battery are ok initially but very soon they require frequent recharging.

 

TBH at 15yrs old and a few attempts at grease, copper silp my leg worms are still pretty stiff, especialy fisrt turns up or down the impact driver is a variable speed by trigger. At mo, possibly due t my old battery drill, its a windy uppy down manual handle to start of finish off

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As others have said use a drill, I use a 20v Aldi one, £50 complete with case and 2 x 1.5ah li-ion Samsung batteries and a 3 year warranty.

I should point out that its powerful and makes a mess of the nose if you don't hold it firmly.

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31 minutes ago, cher129 said:

 

 

 

TBH at 15yrs old and a few attempts at grease, copper silp my leg worms are still pretty stiff, especialy fisrt turns up or down the impact driver is a variable speed by trigger. At mo, possibly due t my old battery drill, its a windy uppy down manual handle to start of finish off

15 yrs old should be no problem at all for a corner steady properly maintained. It sounds like you have a maintenance problem which should be simple to resolve. Better to save your money and get the corner steadies fixed.

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Sounds as if the threads need a good clean.

 

Clean off all the grease & copperslip you have on them with some tissue and solvent,  then apply a smear or two of valve grinding paste on the threads and wind them fully up and down a few times, until it all runs smoothly.   You can buy it from many places, if you don't know an old person who used to maintain their cars years ago and would no doubt, have a tin or two at the back of the garage

valve grinding paste

 

Thoroughly clean off the valve grinding paste and apply fresh grease and the jobs a goodun!

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If the car brakes are locked on, you don't need a bigger engine to move the car, you need to release the brakes. Similarly if the corner steadies are hard to turn, they need lubrication.

Remember the steadies should never be used to level the caravan, that is done with levelling blocks under the wheels, and careful adjustment of the jockey wheel. Once level, and only when level, should the steadies be used (as the name suggests) to steady the caravan.

Gordon.

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Its not unusual for them use the corner steadies to tie the caravan to the transporter when delivered, this can bend them and make it hard for us mere mortals to wind them.

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6 hours ago, Legal Eagle said:

Impact drivers operate by a combination of rotation and concussive blows to force fixings through tough materials. They typically deliver two to three times more turning force (torque) than the average drill/driver. I wouldn't have thought winding corner steadies up and down requires that level of power!

 

Yes, but they they only deliver the torque in a reactive way, the concussive action only starts when it senses resistance to the turning action (which can be controlled on more expensive models). If the trigger is released as soon as the concussive action starts then the full extent of the torque capability will not be delivered and no damage will be done.   Only if the trigger is held until after rotation is completely stopped will  the full torque capability of the impact driver be applied.

 

On balance it may be  better to limit the torque by using a drill/driver with torque control but an impact driver in the right hands will not necessarily cause damage. Also a poorly maintained steady will require 'an amount' of torque to move it regardless of what device supplies the torque.  

Edited by jetA1

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7 hours ago, cher129 said:

Hi all, anyone any advice or experience using an impact driver to raise and lower corner legs. . Been using a Bosch 24v for years but the NiCad battery has now had it and not cost effective to replace. Looking at a Budget Twin pack at a fair price but would the impact driver be of any use instead of the std 18v combi drill thats also in the pack. TIA

Try recellyourbattery. com He recelled my Drill / Winder batteries at a very reasonable cost.

Gordon

 

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1 hour ago, Gordon said:

 

Remember the steadies should never be used to level the caravan,

 

Not even a little bit. ...:D

 

2014609240_Misuseofcornersteadies..jpg.2b50ae36f90862bb9f242c23d9f689f7.jpg

 

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12 hours ago, Gordon7912 said:

Try recellyourbattery. com He recelled my Drill / Winder batteries at a very reasonable cost.

Gordon

 

At the start of 2016 I got two replacement batteries for my Bosch cordless drill. The drill was about 10 years old, has had a fair bit of use and although it came with two batteries I usually only take one away. On a 7 week trip using 10 sites I had to use the hand winder to raise legs on the last site.   I thought about taking two batteries with me as I did not need a new drill.  

 

I looked on the internet and found these which, from memory, had more capacity than the originals:

2 of Bosch Genuine Pod Style Battery (14. 4V, 1. 5Ah, NiCd) (Bosch Pt No 2607335533, 2607335534, 2607335711)

Sold by: RAI Technical Ltd

£32. 52

 

 

Looked today and they are now £75 for a pair!

 

We visited 8 sites in a row in May/July during one trip this year but now have Rech motormover which utilises the drill to wind on. Took the spare just in case but not needed.

Edited by Easy T

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15 hours ago, jetA1 said:

 

Yes, but they they only deliver the torque in a reactive way, the concussive action only starts when it senses resistance to the turning action (which can be controlled on more expensive models). If the trigger is released as soon as the concussive action starts then the full extent of the torque capability will not be delivered and no damage will be done.   Only if the trigger is held until after rotation is completely stopped will  the full torque capability of the impact driver be applied.

 

On balance it may be  better to limit the torque by using a drill/driver with torque control but an impact driver in the right hands will not necessarily cause damage. Also a poorly maintained steady will require 'an amount' of torque to move it regardless of what device supplies the torque.  

Fascinating but I feel irrelevant to the original question asked (which suggests limited previous experience of such a tool). Do you really consider an impact driver as a suitable tool to raise and lower corner steadies??

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If the corner steadies are well lubricated it is quite possible they will run up and down without the impact operating, so no problem.  

 

And you've clearly chosen to ignore my second paragraph.  

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Impact driver = No

Something small, cheap'n'cheerful = Yes

 

You should easily be able to raise/lower steadies by hand.

 

Small driver

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Though the threaded rod may, or may not be greased periodically, many aren't, this isn't the only part of the steady that needs lubrication.

 

There are also the joints at the fixed end of the leg side supports (each side of the hexagon mounting.) the corresponding ones on the leg, the rod bearings area at both ends, and also the slide that the rod ' nut ' slides on.

 

The rod and its corresponding nut and also the nut bearing surface and slide only need need a good quality grease, I use a sticky water resistant one for these areas.

 

All the other pivot points however are better lubricated with engine oil, just daubing grease on these won't get lubrication into where it's needed, I've seen stiff legs where the pivot points have grease on, wipe it away and low and behold a rusty joint.

 

Ref, cleaning the threads etc, all that's needed is a decent de-greaser, paraffin or turps will do at a  pinch, brushes, scrapers wire brush,  gloves, goggles, boiler suit, some old sheets and an old bowl or roasting tin.

 

Wipe / scrape off as much as possible, put the bowl with de-greaser under the leg, liberally brush the de-greaser into every nook and cranny, repeat till clean, when doing the rod, get someone to wind it up and down with a cordless drill, again till clean.

 

Depending on de-greaser, wash down with water then let dry

 

Then before re-lubricating, take the opportunity to thoroughly examine the leg for any distortion, bent rod, or corroded / seized joints, repair as required, then lubricate as above, again using a cordless drill  to work the leg, helping to ensure the lubricant gets to everywhere it's needed.

 

After doing this and getting the leg to move easily, all that will be needed is once or twice a year to check and re-apply the lubricants.

 

 

 

 

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Thanks all, given me alot to think about cleaning up the various joints and re lubricating before using a sledge hammer to crack an egg. .....all advice gratefully received.

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Cordless drill should work just fine, just be sure to hold it steady! :)

Sofia

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Any device used to turn the corner steady thread that has a mechanical advantage greater than the standard crank handle has the potential to cause damage. If the threads and pivot points of the corner steady are well maintained and lubricated, the standard handle should be all that is needed to lower and raise the legs. Once fully extended, half a turn max on the handle should be all that is needed to nip them tight to the ground. On lightweight chassis the corner steadies are not jacks, and should never be used to lift the caravan.

When parked, most of the load should be taken by the wheels on the main axle(s) with only the noseweight being carried by the jockey wheel. The corner steadies are so called because they are only there to steady the caravan as the load (people) move around within the caravan.

Corner steady liverage.jpg

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The use of power tools against the manual crank handle should only be necessary to complete the task quickly, not to overcome any tightness of the screw, if this is necessary then as previously mentioned it must be down to a bent screw  dirty threads male and female or inadequate lubrication.  

On 03/10/2018 at 20:48, Jaydug said:

 

Not even a little bit. ...:D

 

2014609240_Misuseofcornersteadies..jpg.2b50ae36f90862bb9f242c23d9f689f7.jpg

 

At least the tyres will not deform during lay up or use :D

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The first time we used the new van I noticed that one of the corner steadies was quite a bit tighter than the other three. It wasn't picked up on collection by as the dealer wound all the steadies. I took the van back for them to quickly check the problem. I explained to the mechanic  that I use a cordless drill (which the mechanic used), with a the torque setting (which the mechanic didn't use) and explained that three steadies moved with a set torque level and the fourth had to be wound with the drill off the torque setting and on normal drill setting. Because the mechanic used a standard drill without torque setting he could not feel the issue. I had my drill with me and demonstrated the difference. He eventually agreed and said he would order a new steady.

 

Anyway-----

 

Took the van back for the new steady to be fitted and a different mechanic was given the job - when tried it was worse than the original!! I believe that another steady was taken from a stock van and fitted to my van.   On talking to the receptionist about the issue she informed me that the mechanic told her that you should never use a drill with a torque setting as the "hammer action" would damage the steady.

 

We agreed to disagree.

 

 

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46 minutes ago, SuperRed said:

The first time we used the new van I noticed that one of the corner steadies was quite a bit tighter than the other three

Same with our new van. Quick squirt of spray grease, and a few up / downs and all is fine

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