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Lost in France

Brexit and insurance

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This was posted in one of the FB groups I belong to, not just France I suspect

 

'I'm subscribed to the governments emails on Brexit and this morning received a ton of them. One was about UK motor insurance in the event of a no deal Brexit. It says that legal minimum UK third party insurance will no longer be valid in the EU and that it will be necessary to purchase a green card, like in the old days. However, it will only be possible to obtain a green card after an agreement has been reached with the country you are travelling to. In other words, anyone in France after 23. 00 on 29/03/19 with a vehicle covered by a UK policy will have to take their vehicle off the road until such time as the UK has negotiated a green card agreement with France.'

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The problem for the insurance industry now, is that they're currently renewing insurances which run for 12 months but they have no idea what the rules will be post 29th March 2019, i.e in 6 months time. From some renewal premiums I've heard of, some companies are adding several hundred pounds just in case. Or maybe using the uncertainty as an opportunity to rip off customers even more. 

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29 minutes ago, Lost in France said:

This was posted in one of the FB groups I belong to, not just France I suspect

 

'I'm subscribed to the governments emails on Brexit and this morning received a ton of them. One was about UK motor insurance in the event of a no deal Brexit. It says that legal minimum UK third party insurance will no longer be valid in the EU and that it will be necessary to purchase a green card, like in the old days. However, it will only be possible to obtain a green card after an agreement has been reached with the country you are travelling to. In other words, anyone in France after 23. 00 on 29/03/19 with a vehicle covered by a UK policy will have to take their vehicle off the road until such time as the UK has negotiated a green card agreement with France.'

 

The Green Card scheme doesn't need to be "negotiated" with other countries - it's the automatic fall-back if there's no other agreement in place https://www. mib. org. uk/making-a-claim/accidents-in-the-uk-involving-a-foreign-registered-vehicle/green-card-system-explained/

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13 minutes ago, Black Grouse said:

 

The Green Card scheme doesn't need to be "negotiated" with other countries - it's the automatic fall-back if there's no other agreement in place https://www. mib. org. uk/making-a-claim/accidents-in-the-uk-involving-a-foreign-registered-vehicle/green-card-system-explained/

I must be missing something, I can't find that in the link provided.
It does say' 

The Green Card system currently comprises 47 countries, including all 28 in the European Union, the additional countries that make up the European Economic Area (EEA), Switzerland, Russia and several countries in the Middle East and others bordering the Mediterranean Sea.  

A Green Card is no longer required for travel to the EEA, Andorra, Serbia and Switzerland. '

 

But the UK will not be part of the EU or EEA after 29/3/19, so at the very least it would mean obtaining a Green Card from your insurer it you wish to travel in one of the 46 other countries.

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Better idea - stay at home until it all settles down!  That's what I intend to do.

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24 minutes ago, Lost in France said:

I must be missing something, I can't find that in the link provided.
It does say' 

The Green Card system currently comprises 47 countries, including all 28 in the European Union, the additional countries that make up the European Economic Area (EEA), Switzerland, Russia and several countries in the Middle East and others bordering the Mediterranean Sea.  

A Green Card is no longer required for travel to the EEA, Andorra, Serbia and Switzerland. '

 

But the UK will not be part of the EU or EEA after 29/3/19, so at the very least it would mean obtaining a Green Card from your insurer it you wish to travel in one of the 46 other countries.

 

You don't have to be part of the EU or EEA, The card is just proof of insurance, also better for us as EU drivers (lorries etc) will have to carry one when driving in the UK.

Quote

Green Card System is designed to fulfil two principal objectives:

1.  To facilitate the movement of vehicles across international borders by the use of an internationally acceptable document proving the existence of insurance (the Green Card or International Insurance Card).

 

 

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Having  managed to buy insurance in a back street shop  in Ubud to drive a rented Suzuki Jimny part way up a volcano in Bali I wonder if some of you are worrying just a little too much about insurance for visits to France.  

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6 minutes ago, Grandpa Steve said:

You don't have to be part of the EU or EEA, 

No but it would depend on how the UK entered into the scheme, if it was as part of an EU wide negotiation and acceptance, it could cause problems if the UK leaves the EU with 'no deal'

 

8 minutes ago, Grandpa Steve said:

also better for us as EU drivers (lorries etc) will have to carry one when driving in the UK.

I would guess that lorries carry one now anyway.

It's also issued automatically in France and is part of the insurance document.

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I will still be in Spain on that date so if I can’t use the car I’ll just have to get Red Pennant to sort it, then again with all the scare stories I might not be allowed on the ferry if it is still running.

 

Am I worried?

 

Ian

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1 hour ago, Lost in France said:

I must be missing something, I can't find that in the link provided.
It does say' 

The Green Card system currently comprises 47 countries, including all 28 in the European Union, the additional countries that make up the European Economic Area (EEA), Switzerland, Russia and several countries in the Middle East and others bordering the Mediterranean Sea.  

A Green Card is no longer required for travel to the EEA, Andorra, Serbia and Switzerland. '

 

But the UK will not be part of the EU or EEA after 29/3/19, so at the very least it would mean obtaining a Green Card from your insurer it you wish to travel in one of the 46 other countries.

 

The Green Card system isn't limited to the EU or EEA as the countries listed shows.

 

Obtaining a Green Card from your insurer would be necessary in a no-deal Brexit - not a particularly big deal.

 

The fact that drivers from other countries would need a Green Card to drive in the UK will just add leverage to getting an agreement on this issue alone.

Edited by Black Grouse

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10 minutes ago, Black Grouse said:

Obtaining a Green Card from your insurer would be necessary in a no-deal Brexit - not a particularly big deal.

Until they re-introduce the £30 administration fee to issue one :-)

 

12 minutes ago, Black Grouse said:

The fact that drivers from other countries would need a Green Card to drive in the UK will just add leverage to getting an agreement on this issue alone.

As I said above, one is automatically issued in many countries.

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If you pick a forward thinking Insurer they are already issuing green cards, this is really not a big deal and maybe it would be wise to get some perspective on the whole brexit thingy.

As we have a home in both Portugal and the UK I get to witness both sides of the discussion/project Fear call it what you will.

The Europeans do not want a calamitous "No Deal" as it will cripple areas of the continent and may take years to recover.

Looking specifically at certain "British Enclaves" they are already seeing a drop off

http://www. theportugalnews. com/news/staycations-rescue-algarve-tourism/46899

 

This has an immediate impact,........ looking again at the Algarve, 80% or so of property transactions by € volume are to British buyers and the local councils are already worried that this will slow down/stop if the EU force a "No Deal"

 

If there is No Deal on the morning of 30/03/2019 there will be one by the end of that week.  

 

Rant over

Thanks all

 

Rob

 

 

 

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 Someone once said  "It ain't over till the fat lady sings" - and in most cases the fat lady is German .  

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5 hours ago, MalH said:

Better idea - stay at home until it all settles down!  That's what I intend to do.

Depends what you call ‘home’, I’ve lived in Germany for 29 years but to me ‘home’ is still Yorkshire. I will probably be visiting the UK at the time of Brexit and I don’t have a ‘Green Card’.

1 hour ago, moorgate said:

 Someone once said  "It ain't over till the fat lady sings" - and in most cases the fat lady is German .  

Well our lass is in the kitchen and I can’t hear any singing :) lol.

 

only joking, she’s not fat :ph34r:

I wonder how long it will take until this thread gets a little heated and then blocked :o

4 hours ago, Lost in France said:

Until they re-introduce the £30 administration fee to issue one :-)

 

As I said above, one is automatically issued in many countries.

They aren’t in Germany

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On 25/09/2018 at 08:02, Lost in France said:

UK motor insurance in the event of a no deal Brexit. It says that legal minimum UK third party insurance will no longer be valid in the EU and that it will be necessary to purchase a green card,

Just treat this as more scaremongering, in the same way as the false predictions of Y2K problems in 2000 with computers with two digit year dates causing total world chaos and the breakdown of modern communications - did it happen? Of course not because it was not in anybody's interest.

 

Will the UK be cut off from all travel throughout Europe next year? Of course not because it is not in anybody's interest.

 

So what if insurance companies have to issue a piece of green paper again? I somehow suspect that a "green card" will be automatically included with all UK policies with "Euro cover" from next year if they're needed.

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The thread can stay as long as members are respectful to each other.

Admin

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3 minutes ago, Gordon said:

Just treat this as more scaremongering, in the same way as the false predictions of Y2K problems in 2000

This is often quoted by leavers, however there are vast differences between yr2k and Brexit, including;

 

 A lot of people made a lot of money out of the confusion and *****, like Brexit and the leaders of the leave campaign.

It was being prepared for, many, many years in advance, unlike Brexit,

Experts were involved and believed, unlike Brexit.

The general, unqualified, public weren't involved in making the decision or fixing the code, unlike Brexit.

It wasn't political, unlike Brexit.

Everyone knew what they were working towards and it was the same endpoint for everyone.

 

6 minutes ago, Gordon said:

So what if insurance companies have to issue a piece of green paper again? I somehow suspect that a "green card" will be automatically included with all UK policies with "Euro cover" from next year if they're needed.

You have more faith in the insurance industry than I do if you think this won't be an excuse to jack-up the rates.

 

7 minutes ago, Gordon said:

 Of course not because it is not in anybody's interest. 

Nor is the UK leaving the EU

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8 minutes ago, Admin said:

The thread can stay as long as members are respectful to each other.

Admin

 

Thought that applied to all threads ? 

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45 minutes ago, Admin said:

The thread can stay as long as members are respectful to each other.

Admin

I’ll give it till teatime 

 

:rolleyes:

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19 minutes ago, Borussia 1900 said:

I’ll give it till teatime 

 

:rolleyes:

 

Sooner I think!

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On 25/09/2018 at 08:02, Lost in France said:

This was posted in one of the FB groups I belong to, not just France I suspect

 

'I'm subscribed to the governments emails on Brexit and this morning received a ton of them. One was about UK motor insurance in the event of a no deal Brexit. It says that legal minimum UK third party insurance will no longer be valid in the EU and that it will be necessary to purchase a green card, like in the old days. However, it will only be possible to obtain a green card after an agreement has been reached with the country you are travelling to. In other words, anyone in France after 23. 00 on 29/03/19 with a vehicle covered by a UK policy will have to take their vehicle off the road until such time as the UK has negotiated a green card agreement with France.'

It only has to change if the EU or the Insurance companies make it change. There is absolutely no reason why  it has to change, all the current agreements can remain if we so wish.

 

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Those with existing policies will carry on with them. If an extra bit of paper is required, then we will get extra bits of paper. This is a "Non issue" like all the other nonsense from those who deny we voted to leave the EU.  

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The bits of paper aren't the issue, insurance companies not knowing what things might be costing them in 6 months time, that don't cost them at present is an issue. They're writing business for 12 months ahead and I doubt they'll stick to previous pricing, hoping that nothing changes. They'll make sure their premium income yields their normal margin, whatever happens and if they end up finding they've over provided it will make a nice bonus.

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It is a simple matter to make things sound complicated. I think the idea that the insurance companies are concerned is a red herring. The over-riding issue for insurance companies is the cost of claims, and the Brexit issues aren't likely to have much impact on  that, in my opinion.  

Edited by Ern

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1 hour ago, Ern said:

It is a simple matter to make things sound complicated. I think the idea that the insurance companies are concerned is a red herring. The over-riding issue for insurance companies is the cost of claims, and the Brexit issues aren't likely to have much impact on  that, in my opinion.  

 

They're not concerned because they've increased premiums substantially this year, to cover themselves because 6 months beforehand they still don't know if they'll face increased costs like EHIC meaning more admin or perhaps no EHIC at all. Vehicle repatriation issues etc. It may all work out but they have to cover themselves, just in case. If it had all been settled 18 months ago, they'd have certainty and would know if increases were necessary, or not.  

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