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SamD

TPMS for twin axle

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Living near to Yorkshire, I don't like to spend money too often!

Would it be enough to have a sensor on each of the forward wheels only, given:

 

  1. Ability to carry on safely for fair distance if one tyre blows.
  2. If the blown one is either of the fronts, the system would tell me.
  3. If the blown one is either of the rears, the system would tell me about increased pressure/temperature of the appropriate front tyre.

 

Where I say 'blows/blown' there are, of course, lesser events.

 

  • Haha 1

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The price difference between 2 wheel and 4 wheel monitoring?

 

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@AJ 

About £30 but I forgot to mention that the extra distance, in my case, would probably mean a repeater - had singular lack of comms success with these blighters.

Edited by SamD

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38 minutes ago, SamD said:

@AJ 

About £30 but I forgot to mention that the extra distance, in my case, would probably mean a repeater - had singular lack of comms success with these blighters.

Does'nt sound too good, better quality unit?

I don't think your theory is wrong, I'm sure you can interpret a single axle to work out whats happening with the other one, all seems logical.

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16 hours ago, SamD said:

Living near to Yorkshire, I don't like to spend money too often!

Would it be enough to have a sensor on each of the forward wheels only, given:..........

  1. If the blown one is either of the rears, the system would tell me about increased pressure/temperature of the appropriate front tyre.

 

Where I say 'blows/blown' there are, of course, lesser events.

 

Thought part of the idea is early detection of a looming problem such that it could be dealt with before a tyre actually blows possibly ripping its wheel arch apart thus sensors on each valve?

 

I would have thought that with a pressure loss on a rear tyre and a sensor in place on it, its alarm would be triggered long before the front increased its temperature to the point that the alarm was triggered on that tyre.

 

15 hours ago, SamD said:

. ......I forgot to mention that the extra distance, in my case, would probably mean a repeater. ......

I have a TyrePal TC215/B on a length setup the same as yours and it works perfectly without a repeater.

Edited by Griff
Repeater Info added.

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I agree with Griff on the detection of rear tyre pressure, via the overloading of the fronts; with pressure loss I am sure the rear tyre carcass will be irrevocably damaged by overheating, before you get to know of its predicament.

Then, your desire to not to spend money will be seriously upset.

 

If I recall correctly my SA tyre to monitor separation is just over the 7 metre figure published for my Tyre Pal.

Now this did initially lead to signal loss, the off side channel intermittently coming and going, even if I swapped to a different sender unit. I twigged it always worked at the start and from that realised then I had not been sitting in the driving seat when the van first came to the car, on the mover. So I relocated the monitor to the extreme right of the dash for faultless operation, even in my extreme range case.

 

I definitely would gamble by spending the "extra" £30, even prepared to invest in the repeater should I not "win", as IMO knowing ASAP caravan tyres are losing pressure is invaluable info.  

Edited by JTQ

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4 hours ago, Griff said:

Thought part of the idea is early detection of a looming problem such that it could be dealt with before a tyre actually blows possibly ripping its wheel arch apart thus sensors on each valve?

 

I would have thought that with a pressure loss on a rear tyre and a sensor in place on it, its alarm would be triggered long before the front increased its temperature to the point that the alarm was triggered on that tyre.

 

I have a TyrePal TC215/B on a length setup the same as yours and it works perfectly without a repeater.

 

I've mentioned it many times on here, that I drove nearly 100 miles with my previous van before I got connection with one of my sensors and once both working every time it rained, they failed.

 

3 hours ago, JTQ said:

I agree with Griff on the detection of rear tyre pressure, via the overloading of the fronts; with pressure loss I am sure the rear tyre carcass will be irrevocably damaged by overheating, before you get to know of its predicament.

Then, your desire to not to spend money will be seriously upset.

 

If I recall correctly my SA tyre to monitor separation is just over the 7 metre figure published for my Tyre Pal.

Now this did initially lead to signal loss, the off side channel intermittently coming and going, even if I swapped to a different sender unit. I twigged it always worked at the start and from that realised then I had not been sitting in the driving seat when the van first came to the car, on the mover. So I relocated the monitor to the extreme right of the dash for faultless operation, even in my extreme range case.

 

I definitely would gamble by spending the "extra" £30, even prepared to invest in the repeater should I not "win", as IMO knowing ASAP caravan tyres are losing pressure is invaluable info.  

 

But are you not both missing the point?  There are people on here who have experienced a 'loss' of a tyre on a TA caravan and carried on for some miles without detriment to safety.   During that time, I'm fairly sure the 'other' tyre on the same side would have indicated something amiss.

 

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Yes but as others on here have said, when a tyre has gone, rotating casing wires have caused substantial damage to the wheel arch and local furniture.

 

Be a shame to risk that on your Vanmaster but if you think thirty quid is over the top?? best not waste it.  :blink:

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7 minutes ago, SamD said:

 

 

But are you not both missing the point?  There are people on here who have experienced a 'loss' of a tyre on a TA caravan and carried on for some miles without detriment to safety.   During that time, I'm fairly sure the 'other' tyre on the same side would have indicated something amiss.

 

 

That others have driven for miles does not give me confidence it has not in their and other cases done that  punctured tyre and the still holding up tyre any good in the process.

I agree the front sensor should pick up on over pressure/heating, but only because by then it is already enduring overloading abuse. At the same time the failed tyre is having all sorts of over flexing heat abuse.  

 

Surely even those with the tightest of pockets will concede that the £30 being discussed here to buy two more sensors is warranted to detect a loss of pressure in a punctured tyre.

These sensibly should be set IMO to alarm very close to the cold value, as running any loss of pressure below the cold value points to a failure as they only get warmer in use.

In practice,  I would be likely to see by glancing at the monitor, as I do, any drop from the normal elevated running value I would expect, let alone need to wait till the warning value.

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You actually need 5 sensors and not four if you carry a spare wheel however Tyrepal only do the kit with 4 or 6 sensors.   If a tyre goes on a twin axle, the other tyre on that side will take all the load and exceed its specifications making it illegal for a start.   The tyre will also get very hot and probably also blow within a few miles.   This almost happened to us a few years ago which is why we went out and purchased the Tyrepal.   If there were other suitable and more reliable options we would probably dump the Tyrepal.  

Three very BIG annoyances.   You cannot see the pressure of the tyres before moving off even after kicking, hitting and swearing at the sensors.   Not good if you have entered an A road from your storage area and cannot stop for several or more miles.   Secondly if you switch it on after you have moved off, it can take up to half and hour before it registers.   Lastly if a tyre is below pressure or hot, it locks on that tyre and bleeps so show the fault.   You then cannot see if any of the other tyres have low pressure as it will not move off the one that is low pressure.

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40 minutes ago, Durbanite said:

You actually need 5 sensors and not four if you carry a spare wheel however Tyrepal only do the kit with 4 or 6 sensors.   

Three very BIG annoyances.   You cannot see the pressure of the tyres before moving off even after kicking, hitting and swearing at the sensors.   Not good if you have entered an A road from your storage area and cannot stop for several or more miles.   Secondly if you switch it on after you have moved off, it can take up to half and hour before it registers.   Lastly if a tyre is below pressure or hot, it locks on that tyre and bleeps so show the fault.   You then cannot see if any of the other tyres have low pressure as it will not move off the one that is low pressure.

 

Not so sure you "need" a sensor on the spare? That going down a bit is not going to present a towing state danger, nor is it that likely stowed as a spare, it is going to pick up a puncture. Arguably desirable, but "need"?

 I have not bothered and I have two spare sensors in the box. I also have a pump and where stowed checking it is not too difficult.

 

I can indeed see the pressures before moving off, simply using the mover to bring the van to the car has woken them up and the values are displayed before I return to the driving seat.

 

Why would anyone switch it off after moving off? It is whilst towing when you need the system.  

 

These sensors send out data immediately they wake up then go into an "armed" mode ready to react to changes. But then cycle with several minute quiet periods so the batteries in the sensors last longer [two years I find].

So it is vital that the monitor is switched on well before you bring the car to the van, to capture the sensor wake up burst of data. Indeed, I never switch off my monitor it stays on, one charge lasting several months before indicating I better plug it in for a couple of hours.

 

Like most kit it has design features that you need to operate with.

 

That it concentrates on a warning where things are going wrong, rather than anything else is a system limitation, but not one I see as a fundamental flaw, like it, I think my immediate problem and point of concentration at that time is the tyre in distress.

Edited by JTQ

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52 minutes ago, JTQ said:

 

Not so sure you "need" a sensor on the spare?  It would be helpful!

 

I can indeed see the pressures before moving off, simply using the mover to bring the van to the car has woken them up and the values are displayed before I return to the driving seat.   No chance with the 215 that we have!

 

Why would anyone switch it off after moving off? It is whilst towing when you need the system.   Who said anything about switching it off?  If you forgot to set it up before moving off and then set it up while on the move it will take about 30 minutes to wake up.

 

These sensors send out data immediately they wake up then go into an "armed" mode ready to react to changes. But then cycle with several minute quiet periods so the batteries in the sensors last longer [two years I find].  It is the waking up that is an issue and Tyrepal admit this and cannot resolve the issue.

So it is vital that the monitor is switched on well before you bring the car to the van, to capture the sensor wake up burst of data. Indeed, I never switch off my monitor it stays on, one charge lasting several months before indicating I better plug it in for a couple of hours. Agreed but sometimes you forget.   We are not all perfect.   :D

 

Like most kit it has design features that you need to operate with.

 

That it concentrates on a warning where things are going wrong, rather than anything else is a system limitation, but not one I see as a fundamental flaw, like it, I think my immediate problem and point of concentration at that time is the tyre in distress.   You have no way of knowing if any other tyres are affect so IMHO a major flaw.

 

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