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Cassette Home Adaptor


brendan456
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I recently saw a fixture that you can add to your soil pipe at home to make cassette emptying much easier. However  I can't remember the product name. It was basically a pipe with a screwed lid for access that could be added on to the soil pipe. Anybody know the product?

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Probably a 4inch T with Rodding access for blocked sewer, as said far easier to tip it down the Pan. That said T piece available at Builders merchants.

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Not a ‘T’ but a ‘Y’ junction.  Ending in a Rodding access point.  

 

In order to insert you will need to cut in to then separate the pipe at the point required. You will then need to be able to part the pipes in order to be able to push back into the joints.  So would best be into a vent pipe.

 

If they can’t be separated then a repair joint can be used but might look ugly.

 

You need to choose solvent ot ring sealed pipe and they need to be the same make as original to ensure a fit.

 

Do you have an access (manhole) cover you could use, perhaps make hook on handles for easy removal.

 

As others I use the home loo, but do have a downstairs one with no carpet from the door.

 

John

 

 

Edited by JCloughie

Volvo V70 D3 SE (was Peugeot 4007, SsangYong Korando), Pulling a Lunar Clubman SI 2015. If you are depressed, you are living in the past. If you are anxious, you are living in the future. If you are at peace, you are living in the present.

 

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I don't think that there is any specific fixture for this, but it could be assembled in a variety of ways using standard joints with an access cap to close the end when not in use.

I have one at home to provide rodding access, but it is mounted horizontal whereas you would want vertical or 45°. 

A good root through the fittings at a large DIY store should enable you to identify the bits.

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Thanks guys.  There is definitely a guy who has brought something to market to allow this - I meant to save the link when I saw it.  Will have another look through the forums and if I find it again, I'll post it here.

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I don’t really understand why anyone would want one. We’ve got a couple of manholes with removable lids and I guess most houses have. The sewer pipe in modern houses are not accessible as they are enclosed in the building and the air inlet pipe protrudes through the roof.  

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1 hour ago, Ern said:

I don’t really understand why anyone would want one. We’ve got a couple of manholes with removable lids and I guess most houses have. The sewer pipe in modern houses are not accessible as they are enclosed in the building and the air inlet pipe protrudes through the roof.  

Not everyone lives in a modern house!

Until recently (When we had an extra loo installed) we had no access point or manhole covers at all and emptying the cassette involved carrying it through the house. We do however, have an accessible vent pipe outside to which an access point could be added.

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Am I missing something here?  Is this business of bringing the business home a normal / regular procedure for folks?

 

I have never brought home a cassette that needed emptying down a toilet in over 30 years of caravanning.   Why don't you empty it before leaving the site? My last action on site is to empty the cassette, rinse it out, and then put about ½ pint of clean water in so that it swills about on the reurn journey, hopefully keeping the inside clean.

 

If it's a long journey we use the facilities at a service area.

 

If the van is kept at a storage area the only course of action is to travel with a clean cassette.

 

John

 

PS, Apologies to the OP, I know this drifts a little from his original question, and I, too, remember the soil pipe modification that Brendan refers to.

 

Edited by Johnaldo
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3 minutes ago, Johnaldo said:

Am I missing something here?  Is this business of bringing the business home a normal / regular procedure for folks?

 

I have never brought home a cassette that needed emptying down a toilet in over 30 years of caravanning.   Why don't you empty it before leaving the site? My last action on site is to empty the cassette, rinse it out, and then put about ½ pint of clean water in so that it swills about on the reurn journey, hopefully keeping the inside clean.

 

If it's a long journey we use the facilities at a service area.

 

If the van is kept at a storage area the only course of action is to travel with a clean cassette.

 

John

 

They may wish to use the caravan at home ;)

Paul B

. .......Mondeo Estate & Elddis Avanté 505 (Tobago)

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we use our van at home and the loo gets used as an  en-suite so we have to empty it occasionally but I wouldn't normally bring a tank with effluent in it home from site.

 

We have a small 450mm OSMA Inspection chamber in the back garden which is ideal for emptying the flush tank.

Edited by matelodave
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Don't all laugh. My sister and brother-in-laws live in the states. they are over here on vacation. They asked me about coupling up the BLACK waste when on a serviced pitch. My answer to them is we don't have that luxury here in the UK, we have to take ours to a chemical waste point. His brother is having a new Winnebago (not a huge one) in a couple of weeks and comes with this feature, the part ex has it as well. Are we behind the times here in the UK and EU! 

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15 minutes ago, David P said:

Don't all laugh. My sister and brother-in-laws live in the states. they are over here on vacation. They asked me about coupling up the BLACK waste when on a serviced pitch. My answer to them is we don't have that luxury here in the UK, we have to take ours to a chemical waste point. His brother is having a new Winnebago (not a huge one) in a couple of weeks and comes with this feature, the part ex has it as well. Are we behind the times here in the UK and EU! 

We are not so much behind the times as on a different track! Even a small Winnebago is what we would call a large motorhome, and their version of "off grid" is far more into wilderness than exists in the UK. For their "off grid" it is necessary to have a fixed onboard black waste tank to avoid polluting the wilderness. To empty such a waste tank by gravity it is necessary for their version of an emptying point to be little more than a manhole cover. Our lightweight portable toilet waste containers would be impractical for them.

Never having had (or should I say never having been willing to pay for?) a fully serviced pitch I have no idea what they provide for black waste.  

 

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2 minutes ago, Stevan said:

We are not so much behind the times as on a different track! Even a small Winnebago is what we would call a large motorhome, and their version of "off grid" is far more into wilderness than exists in the UK. For their "off grid" it is necessary to have a fixed onboard black waste tank to avoid polluting the wilderness. To empty such a waste tank by gravity it is necessary for their version of an emptying point to be little more than a manhole cover. Our lightweight portable toilet waste containers would be impractical for them.

Never having had (or should I say never having been willing to pay for?) a fully serviced pitch I have no idea what they provide for black waste.  

 

None of the serviced pitches I've used have had provision for black waste so a conventional chemical toilet emptying facility was provided - not that it stopped some caravanners emptying their cassettes into the grey water drain.

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34 minutes ago, Black Grouse said:

None of the serviced pitches I've used have had provision for black waste so a conventional chemical toilet emptying facility was provided - not that it stopped some caravanners emptying their cassettes into the grey water drain.

 

I guess it depends on where it all finishes up.

At home we only have a combined waste so it all ends up in the same pipe anyway.

However, not quite what you would want on a site, especially if you were the next user perhaps?

 

Whilst we don't wait until home to empty, we do sometimes get home with "travelling waste" in the cassette.

We have a choice of manholes plus one of those Hunter drain grids that the centre lifts out for direct access to the pipe, no U bend.

 

If I had to install something especially, it would be one of those.

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2 hours ago, staffordshirechina said:

At home we only have a combined waste so it all ends up in the same pipe anyway.

 

The above combined system is fairly unusual.  Most of us have separate systems.  Just pointing out for those who are not aware, that if emptying foul waste this should never go into a surface water drain.

 

John

Volvo V70 D3 SE (was Peugeot 4007, SsangYong Korando), Pulling a Lunar Clubman SI 2015. If you are depressed, you are living in the past. If you are anxious, you are living in the future. If you are at peace, you are living in the present.

 

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1 hour ago, JCloughie said:

The above combined system is fairly unusual.  Most of us have separate systems.  Just pointing out for those who are not aware, that if emptying foul waste this should never go into a surface water drain.

 

In our village a great many of the houses, like mine, were built in the 1910s, 20s and 30s … and they all seem to have combined drains, ie the rain water flows into the foul water sewers.

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7 hours ago, Johnaldo said:

 

In our village a great many of the houses, like mine, were built in the 1910s, 20s and 30s … and they all seem to have combined drains, ie the rain water flows into the foul water sewers.

Agreed, but even older properties have been separated since the introduction of the separate system some 50 to 60 years ago.  this would happen more so in urban areas.    I don’t know the stats, but that is why I used the term ‘fairly unusual’.

 

All I was doing was trying to ensure people realised that they shouldn’t dump foul into surface water drains.

 

John

Volvo V70 D3 SE (was Peugeot 4007, SsangYong Korando), Pulling a Lunar Clubman SI 2015. If you are depressed, you are living in the past. If you are anxious, you are living in the future. If you are at peace, you are living in the present.

 

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2 hours ago, JCloughie said:

Agreed, but even older properties have been separated since the introduction of the separate system some 50 to 60 years ago.  this would happen more so in urban areas.    I don’t know the stats, but that is why I used the term ‘fairly unusual’.

 

All I was doing was trying to ensure people realised that they shouldn’t dump foul into surface water drains.

 

John

 

Surface water drains are the ones in the kerb gutters on street that collect rainwater runoff from roads & pavements.

 

On properties the water from roof gutters, sinks, baths, showers, washing machines etc  all end up in the same pipe as the contents of your soil stack, the intention is that the grey water helps flush the solids into the sewers and  ultimately the sewerage plant,  which is a different path to the surface water drains which can go straight to a water course or river.

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Most down pipes from roof gutters etc should now run into soakaways so don't even be tempted to pour effluent down them unless you are absolutely certain that they actually do drain into the sewer.

 

The drain that sinks, showers, baths and washing machines drain into should be OK unless they go to different drain than the toilet - some rural properties for instance.

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1 hour ago, JCloughie said:

Agreed, but even older properties have been separated since the introduction of the separate system some 50 to 60 years ago.  this would happen more so in urban areas.    I don’t know the stats, but that is why I used the term ‘fairly unusual’.

 

All I was doing was trying to ensure people realised that they shouldn’t dump foul into surface water drains.

 

John

The biggest issue, is where rainwater drainage goes into a soakaway. Even grey waste can result in an awful stink over time

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Some good advice above - unless you are totally certain as to the connections (i. e. you can lift a manhole and confirm your loo also goes that way) don't pour it down a drain at your home - there are many variations on drainage systems and you might even find that one side of your roof goes to surface water while the other side goes to the foul/combined system.

 

we just empty our cassette down the toilet - it would only ever have a small amount in anyway

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18 minutes ago, Grandpa Steve said:

 

Surface water drains are the ones in the kerb gutters on street that collect rainwater runoff from roads & pavements.

 

On properties the water from roof gutters, sinks, baths, showers, washing machines etc  all end up in the same pipe as the contents of your soil stack, the intention is that the grey water helps flush the solids into the sewers and  ultimately the sewerage plant,  which is a different path to the surface water drains which can go straight to a water course or river.

There are several different arrangements in use, what you describe is probably  the most common, particularly in  urban settings. Roof gutters sometimes go into a soakaway and should not receive toilet or grey waste. Rural settings often have no mains drainage at all and a septic tank is used which the owner has to pay to have emptied. In these cases, particularly for Temporary Holiday Sites and rally fields, owners sometimes ask for grey waste to be emptied into hedgerows to avoid having to pay to have it carried away.

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44 minutes ago, Grandpa Steve said:

On properties the water from roof gutters, sinks, baths, showers, washing machines etc  all end up in the same pipe as the contents of your soil stack, the intention is that the grey water helps flush the solids into the sewers and  ultimately the sewerage plant,  which is a different path to the surface water drains which can go straight to a water course or river.

 

Not in our area it doesn't.    At the side of my house I have two gulleys side by side.    One takes the grey water from kitchen and bathroom.    The other together with two others at the front take the run-off from the roof.     A few years ago the water board became concerned about the ponds in the local parks becoming polluted.   They were so concerned that they visited every property to check that washing machine drain pipes had not been plumbed into rain gulleys.      Apparently during periods of heavy rain, the over-flow from the rain drain is diverted to the ponds.

Citroen C5-X7 Tourer+Avondale Rialto 480/2
https://jondogoescaravanning.com

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5 hours ago, Grandpa Steve said:

 

Surface water drains are the ones in the kerb gutters on street that collect rainwater runoff from roads & pavements.

 

On properties the water from roof gutters, sinks, baths, showers, washing machines etc  all end up in the same pipe as the contents of your soil stack, the intention is that the grey water helps flush the solids into the sewers and  ultimately the sewerage plant,  which is a different path to the surface water drains which can go straight to a water course or river.

 

At the back of our house (early 1900s) everything goes down the sewer, at the front the water from the roof goes into the roads drains

Paul B

. .......Mondeo Estate & Elddis Avanté 505 (Tobago)

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