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Last winter we had a young Spanish family, Mum, Dad and three young children on the pitch next to us. They were very polite and the children were well behaved. In conversation they said they were only here for a few days because it was expensive (we are on long term pensionistas rate). We asked them if they knew about ACSI and they didn't so we explained it to them. As we just pitch up on one spot each year now we have no use for it so we gave them our book.

A few minutes ago we had a caller. It was the same man who called to thank us. Not only did joining ACSI save them money but it allowed them to use their caravan more and from here they are off to Malaga for the New Year.

Leaves a warm feeling, not from having helped someone we had never met before but the fact that he bothered to look us up just to say thank you.

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Nice thought,nice reaction. .well done.

geoff

Kia Sorento KX-1 CRDI 4WD towing an Elddis Affinity 530

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Sulyka - we did something very similar a few years ago.   We met a couple at a site in mid-France where we are regulars,  and got chatting.   They told us they'd always wanted to go back to a favourite site on the Med, but it had become too expensive for them.    They were very sad because she had motor-neurone disease and wasn't going to be able to get many more holidays, so desperately wanted to go back on the beach for one last time.   We knew the site well, and knew that it took Camping Cheques - which they'd never heard of.   The beach from the site is accessible for 'buggies' on hard-packed sand, so we chatted about the site, and when we left we gave them five Camping Cheques which would expire before we could use them again,  and told them to have a good time.    The minute we got home we had a phone call to say they were ringing from the beach, they'd got there, and that everyone on site had made it easy for them - helping to lift the buggy in and out of the car, bringing shopping for them, and generally helping them get in as much quality time as possible.   It had been one of the most memorable holidays they'd had and had been very precious to them.   We still get a Christmas card, sadly just from him now, as she passed away the year after their holiday.

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Interestingly, we had a 'neighbourly experience' the other way round, thirty-six years ago.   We were on our way back from a camping holiday in the Cevennes, and were on our way home.   We  had just done the Massif Central, and drove into Vierzon where we stopped for lunch at a little cafe/restaurant.    When we'd eaten and went back to our car it looked as if a wheel had fallen off, so we stood there a bit horrified and perplexed wondering what to do (we were too poor in those days to take out breakdown insurance!).   We were travelling with our two year old son.   A group of men who were all dressed up for a wedding came out of the cafe where we'd just had lunch ( we'd been chatting to them in Franglais about France).  One of them came over to the car - and said in slow English 'I am Jean Pierre P. ......... and I know what is wrong with your car.   I am mechanic and I have the part you need in my garage in my home'.   He then said he'd be back in ten minutes, changed into overalls, came back, jacked up the car and replaced a front ball joint.   He wouldn't accept any payment at all. ........ but gave us his phone number to ring him when we got home ' to check that his workmanship was satifactory'.   We did and we've been friends ever since.     We stayed with him and his (eventual) wife, Frederique, were invited to both their daughters' christenings, and my son (now thirty-eight) had a teddy which he called 'Jean P-Bear' and which is still in our 'Keep these please, Mum' cupboard'!   We remain in touch to this day.   We intend to visit him again this year In Bidart where he now lives in retirement, when we're back in France again.

Edited by ValA
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We had a similar experience, also many years ago on our first trip to France with 2 young children. We were towing round the Paris peripherique when the engine started to boil over, so we pulled off at the next junction & tried to find somewhere to pull over with a 16ft van - at 5pm on a Friday.

We eventually did, and were letting the engine cool in front of a garage where a man and his son were locking up  for the weekend. They came over to help, spent an hour at the kerb, eventually hotwiring the fan so we could continue our journey. Like Val, we were pretty poor at the time, but tried to give them francs as we were so grateful - they refused to take anything & wished us a happy holiday: it was, thanks to our good Samaritans, & we've always tried to pay it forward.

Things like this really do restore your faith in human nature, don't they? 

Follow the link to read of our travels with & without the caravan :- Blog

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