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New Tyre Tread Depth

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I recently purchased a set of brand new Avon ZX7's and when I checked one with my digital vernier I was disappointed to discover the depth was only 6. 82 mm. I think this kind of sucks. When you buy a brand new tyre you expect to get 8 mm. Skimping on rubber would save them a fair bit especially for a 20" rim like mine. I measured an unused 17" Dunlop I have and that was nearer the mark at 7. 71mm.

 

I wonder if this cunning practise is common?

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Yes, I'd agree that 8mm is the 'norm' but more important is how quickly the rubber wears out.

 

I've never heard of Avon tyres, are they a budget or premium brand?

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I wonder if this cunning practise is common?

I guess it rather depends upon whether you want best dry weather grip (where slicks are best but illegal for road use) or best wet weather performance where a good tread depth is needed to clear the water. If Avon ZX7s are advertised as "performance" tyres the reduced tread depth combined with a harder rubber compound may be to minimise the tread movement in cornering so giving a quicker response to steering input.

 

On the other hand it may be as you imply, a bit of cost cutting on the part of the manufacturer.

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Yes, I'd agree that 8mm is the 'norm' but more important is how quickly the rubber wears out.

 

I've never heard of Avon tyres, are they a budget or premium brand?

Been around along time. Used to do a lot of motorbike tyres, midrange I think

Edited by ian16527

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Yes, I'd agree that 8mm is the 'norm' but more important is how quickly the rubber wears out.

 

I've never heard of Avon tyres, are they a budget or premium brand?

 

used to be a British company but I think its now American now could be Coopers?

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Quite common - deeper tread depth sounds like a good idea from a wear perspective but the tyre is more complex to design as the tyre blocks are taller and more liable to collapse under hard cornering, more mid/spec brands have a reduced depth as this is easier and cheaper to engineer.

 

Michelin tyres have 9mm on them, but then I paid £900 for a set of four!

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used to be a British company but I think its now American now could be Coopers?

That's exactly who they are owned by.

 

Formula one autocentres use them-recently had two fitted on my "other"car-not bad actually.

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I recently purchased a set of brand new Avon ZX7's and when I checked one with my digital vernier I was disappointed to discover the depth was only 6. 82 mm. I think this kind of sucks. When you buy a brand new tyre you expect to get 8 mm. Skimping on rubber would save them a fair bit especially for a 20" rim like mine. I measured an unused 17" Dunlop I have and that was nearer the mark at 7. 71mm.

 

I wonder if this cunning practise is common?

It does depend how/where you measure them - my Touareg's OE Bridgestones were 8. 2 in the centre but only 5. 5 in the outer blocks.

 

The deeper the tread, the more the blocks squirm around which isn't good for dry grip, particularly on ultra-high performance tyres like the Avon ZX7.

 

It is of course the modern fashion to buy cars with large "bling" wheels and ultra-high performance tyres - the Avon ZX7 going up to "Y" speed rating which is good for 186 mph - not exactly a cheap tyre to start with.

 

If your Audi Q7 is fitted with the standard Porsche Cayenne 4-pot Brembo's (as the Touareg is :) ) then you can fit VW Group wheel down to 17" with higher profile tyres to maintain the rolling radius and get a much wider choice of tyre and better value for money - if your Q7 has even bigger brakes then the minimum rim size is bigger.

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Quite common - deeper tread depth sounds like a good idea from a wear perspective but the tyre is more complex to design as the tyre blocks are taller and more liable to collapse under hard cornering, more mid/spec brands have a reduced depth as this is easier and cheaper to engineer.

 

Michelin tyres have 9mm on them, but then I paid £900 for a set of four!

£900 for 4 tyres :o Blimey, I think you've been ripped off there, what size are they?

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I replaced my tow car's (Freelander 2 SD4) fairly worn Continentals with Avon ZX7s a few months back. The change of brand was driven by the temporary non-availability of the oem 19" Continentals but I have to say that so far I am very pleased with Avons.

 

They are quiet and the car feels sure footed in all conditions. If the longevity is there I will probably use Avon again but never again from F1 Tyre Centre - that's another story though and would probably fall foul of name and shame rules.

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Yes, I'd agree that 8mm is the 'norm' but more important is how quickly the rubber wears out.

 

I've never heard of Avon tyres, are they a budget or premium brand?

Avon tyres were made in Melksham Wiltshire,my dad used to work there,very popular tyre in the eighties,nineties.
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£900 for 4 tyres :o Blimey, I think you've been ripped off there, what size are they?

I shopped around, Blackcircles, local suppliers, Camskill etc - I could have got some ditch-finders for less than half the price but went for the right spec as that's the bit keeping you on the road.

 

My car has 225/40R19 93Y's, they are like liquorice, I prefer to stick with Michelin as they do last longer than other tyres, that's certainly my experience. You get what you pay for.

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Avon tyres were original equipment on Rolls Royce and Bentley's back in the day when they were proper British cars.

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I'm due for some more tyres for the front as these have started cracking as well as getting a bit too low for winter weather, I'll get some more snow tyres as they've have been brilliant on wet grass, but will go for a better brand this time.

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Michelin tyres have 9mm on them, but then I paid £900 for a set of four!

The Michelin 245/65/17 Latitude Cross 111H tyres for my Jeep set us back £558. 45 for 5 tyres as I replaced the spare at the same time.

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I recently purchased a set of brand new Avon ZX7's and when I checked one with my digital vernier I was disappointed to discover the depth was only 6. 82 mm. I think this kind of sucks. When you buy a brand new tyre you expect to get 8 mm. Skimping on rubber would save them a fair bit especially for a 20" rim like mine. I measured an unused 17" Dunlop I have and that was nearer the mark at 7. 71mm.

 

I wonder if this cunning practise is common?

Surely the measure of value should be one of mileage obtained from the set.

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The Michelin 245/65/17 Latitude Cross 111H tyres for my Jeep set us back £558. 45 for 5 tyres as I replaced the spare at the same time.

It's all to do with size and availability - I've always paid a premium for my A2 as it has unique tyres (185/50R16 81V) which for many years were only fitted to this car (although the last generation Micra used them too) this meant a lack of choice and branded tyres at over £100 per corner for what is essentially a 75bhp supermini - we had another A2 for a while which used a common size of 17" wheel, high-spec performance tyres were about £75 a corner despite being wider and lower profile.

 

Kumho now do a well-rated Ecsta in the size which is £60 a corner and does the job well. Many owners bit the bullet and bought 195/45's (I think) which were substantially cheaper at about £60 a corner for a high spec tyre but they look like balloons on the car!

Edited by FrankBullet

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I shopped around, Blackcircles, local suppliers, Camskill etc - I could have got some ditch-finders for less than half the price but went for the right spec as that's the bit keeping you on the road.

 

My car has 225/40R19 93Y's, they are like liquorice, I prefer to stick with Michelin as they do last longer than other tyres, that's certainly my experience. You get what you pay for.

That's an expensive size of tyre from any of the premium brands - £167-233 per tyre fully fitted according to My Tyre - I agree though about sticking to premium brands.

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It is of course the modern fashion to buy cars with large "bling" wheels and ultra-high performance tyres - the Avon ZX7 going up to "Y" speed rating which is good for 186 mph - not exactly a cheap tyre to start with.

 

 

 

I wonder why people buy "road" tyres with such a high speed rating when legally in the UK they can only drive at 70MPH I think there is only one road in Europe that will allow higher speeds legally and that is Germany :unsure:

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I wonder why people buy "road" tyres with such a high speed rating when legally in the UK they can only drive at 70MPH I think there is only one road in Europe that will allow higher speeds legally and that is Germany :unsure:

Some countries legislation requires tyres capable of more than the vehicle's maximum speed - it's cheaper for car makers to fit the same tyre regardless of market the car is intended for.

 

In addition, there's greater volume demand for faster tyres so an economy of scale as they can be fitted to slower cars - go back 2 decades and the V-rated versions of 205/60 x14 were cheaper that the H-rated version.

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Michelin tyres have 9mm on them, but then I paid £900 for a set of four!

 

Michelin CrossClimate are start with 7mm rather than the more common 8mm. Perhaps there are technical reasons, as I believe a softer compound is used to assist the winter performance. I was thinking perhaps too much depth of tread with a softer compound gives too much flexibility on the sidewall.

 

To compensate Michelin guarantee maximum effectiveness of the tyre down to the legal minimum of 1. 6mm, and say the 3mm limit which some are pushing is wasteful and unnecessary.

 

https://www. goodwood. com/grrc/road/news/2016/10/michelin-tread-depth/

 

I'm happy with my CrossClimates, but I'm waiting to assess mileage and it's too early yet.

 

Gordon

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[snip. ..] To compensate Michelin guarantee maximum effectiveness of the tyre down to the legal minimum of 1. 6mm, and say the 3mm limit which some are pushing is wasteful and unnecessary.

 

https://www. goodwood. com/grrc/road/news/2016/10/michelin-tread-depth/ [/...snip]

 

Gordon

That's an interesting stance taken by Michelin, particularly as an increase in the legal minimum tread depth would drive significantly higher tyre sales.

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Michelin CrossClimate are start with 7mm rather than the more common 8mm. Perhaps there are technical reasons, as I believe a softer compound is used to assist the winter performance. I was thinking perhaps too much depth of tread with a softer compound gives too much flexibility on the sidewall.

 

To compensate Michelin guarantee maximum effectiveness of the tyre down to the legal minimum of 1. 6mm, and say the 3mm limit which some are pushing is wasteful and unnecessary.

 

https://www. goodwood. com/grrc/road/news/2016/10/michelin-tread-depth/

 

I'm happy with my CrossClimates, but I'm waiting to assess mileage and it's too early yet.

 

Gordon

I'm sceptical of Michelin's statement that no evidence exists - I thought there was plenty of evidence that the risk of aquaplaning is much higher at 1. 6mm than 3mm - in those circumstances the tread compound and number of sipes are irrelevant, it's down to the efficiency of the main grooves to shift large volumes of water, and clearly those grooves need depth.

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