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Vanmaster Man

How I Love France.

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I once asked a site owner in Holland why the Dutch are so good and so well versed in English. His answer.

 

"We know we are a small country with a minority language and we would get nowhere in the world if we relied on it".

 

 

John

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I once asked a site owner in Holland why the Dutch are so good and so well versed in English. His answer.

 

"We know we are a small country with a minority language and we would get nowhere in the world if we relied on it".

 

 

John

Like Wales :D

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Oi!

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lol

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I shall be driving back through France at the weekend in my ultra reliable E Class.

 

Unfortunately its in the way between UK and Spain and the missus doesn't do boats!

 

Oh well, at the least their hotels accept dogs so it does have some good points!! ;);)

 

Phil.

Edited by phil1041
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I assume you don't like France then Phil. Seems a strange thread to join in on if you don't. You could just not bother and then we wouldn't have these negative and provocative comments which just wind everyone up. What you could do is be more positive about stuff and everyone would start to enjoy your input. Who knows where that might lead, friends, fun and happiness is likely.

Try it, it might just work.

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I assume you don't like France then Phil. Seems a strange thread to join in on if you don't. You could just not bother and then we wouldn't have these negative and provocative comments which just wind everyone up. What you could do is be more positive about stuff and everyone would start to enjoy your input. Who knows where that might lead, friends, fun and happiness is likely.

Try it, it might just work.

You do amuse me :D:D:D:D:D

 

 

Phil.

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That pleases me. Thanks for taking the time to tell me. Now I'm happy too. :Thankyou::D

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My pleasure, you should take up councilling, obviously another talent you have to add to your many others you grace us with on all manor of subjects, I am in awe!!

 

I was once sent for councilling after dealing with a messy quadruple fatal on the M62 there's something about very patronising people that seems to bring out the worst in me, God it's turned me into a troll apparently!!!

 

Phil.

Edited by phil1041

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Now now Gentlemen, let's just all be friends :):)

 

You say potato, I say Pot-ah-tow etc

 

 

Such fun !

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My pleasure, you should take up councilling, obviously another talent you have to add to your many others you grace us with on all manor of subjects, I am in awe!!

 

I was once sent for councilling after dealing with a messy quadruple fatal on the M62 there's something about very patronising people that seems to bring out the worst in me, God it's turned me into a troll apparently!!!

 

Phil.

 

 

If you consider counselling to be patronising perhaps you shouldn't be (have been?) be in a job that involves messy situations?

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I have been to counselling, and I love France. So I feel qualified to contribute.

 

It's the bakeries for me, in one small town there were six and every croissant amande was different! I loved eating them all!

 

My French is terrible but I always try and it's always appreciated. Beignet au sucre was this years pronunciation challenge. I think I got it! :-)

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He's old bill. He's never told me but you can tell a mile off. Cynicism is his training coming through.

My request was that he made a positive contribution on my threads rather than just ran in with his LR hating drivel.

Trolling seems to be too ingrained for him to let it go. He says things to get a reaction, not to add anything of meaning or interest.

Back on topic again.

France is a great place and the country, the people and the food is wonderful. I'm sorting out where to go next Easter and the following summer. Thinking of going into Spain again but undecided on the actual destination.

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If you're thinking about Spain Vanmaster I can recommend most of the big sites on the Costa Brava (depends what kind of site you're after though).

If you can go outside of the main holiday season it's much much cheaper and you'll have a better choice of pitches, all the 'best' spots on the site we're going to next year had already been booked in July this year. (Laguna, Castello d'Empuries)

Other sites open their 'booking site' at the end of October.

 

I don't know how old you are but L'Amfora seems popular with the older folk and Las Dunas & El Delfin Verde are great if you've got kids. Laguna, La Ballena Alegre & Cala GoGo are our favourites and suit all ages.

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I love France. I loved our Journee de Patrimoine on. Sunday, where our tiny. village had artisan stalls, an accordionist, a. lunchtime 'repas' which everone helped prepare, and OH ran an English ' Salon du The' in the afternoon, with an English cream tea, after it was suggested that the day should include a contribution from.'Les Anglais'.who own homes here. We made and served sandwiches, quiche,sausage rolls, lemon drizzle, chocolat, victoria Sandwich, scones and cream, and trifle It was so popular with everone, and so busy, and we were the only English people in the village at the time, so we had to accept. help from a couple of English visitors. We served 65 people and sold absolutely everything. Afterwards we had a lovely email to say our contribution to village life was unique and special, and very much appreciated by all in the village

 

What I loved were the compliments, the little French boy who requested a second scone and cteam, the requests for recipes, the tolerance when we ran out of cups, and the request that we do it again next year!

Should say 'OH and I' in the above post, but Don't appear to be able to edit it.

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Old Bill??????? Good grief!!

 

Phil.

Edited by phil1041

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If you consider counselling to be patronising perhaps you shouldn't be (have been?) be in a job that involves messy situations?

Actually beejay, sadly it was the other way round!

 

The Councillor had to leave the room when i showed her the photographs of what i had to deal with, i wont go into too much detail but one of the mutilated victims was a 4 month old, it transpired that the Councillor had given birth just 3 months previously, unknown to me i might add.

 

There is probably a name for this phenomenon, i expect our resident expert Mr Vanmaster will be along shortly to enlighten us and explain it all from his endless fountain of knowledge, he is an expert on Police training apparently :P:P

 

So, to answer your question, during the 32 years of my service i managed to develop my own coping strategies.

 

 

Phil.

Edited by phil1041
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I love France. I loved our Journee de Patrimoine on. Sunday, where our tiny. village had artisan stalls, an accordionist, a. lunchtime 'repas' which everone helped prepare, and OH ran an English ' Salon du The' in the afternoon, with an English cream tea, after it was suggested that the day should include a contribution from.'Les Anglais'.who own homes here. We made and served sandwiches, quiche,sausage rolls, lemon drizzle, chocolat, victoria Sandwich, scones and cream, and trifle It was so popular with everone, and so busy, and we were the only English people in the village at the time, so we had to accept. help from a couple of English visitors. We served 65 people and sold absolutely everything. Afterwards we had a lovely email to say our contribution to village life was unique and special, and very much appreciated by all in the village

 

What I loved were the compliments, the little French boy who requested a second scone and cteam, the requests for recipes, the tolerance when we ran out of cups, and the request that we do it again next year!

Should say 'OH and I' in the above post, but Don't appear to be able to edit it.

Wonderful!

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Actually beejay, sadly it was the other way round!

 

The Councillor had to leave the room when i showed her the photographs of what i had to deal with, i wont go into too much detail but one of the mutilated victims was a 4 month old, it transpired that the Councillor had given birth just 3 months previously, unknown to me i might add.

 

So, to answer your question, during the 32 years of my service i managed to develop my own coping strategies.

 

 

Phil.

I agree Phil, counselling isn't for every one. A very good friend of mine (we were in Iraq together amongst various other Ops) didn't get any help when he obviously needed some, he hung himself a few years ago, very sad. My wife say's I'm a changed man post Iraq and I should see someone but it's not for me and not something some tree hugging German counsellor could relate to.

Anyway, I'm fine . ... . .. . .. . .. . .. . wibble, wibble :wub:

 

I don't think we could get more 'off topic' if we tried ;)

Edited by Borussia 1900
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I agree Phil, counselling isn't for every one. A very good friend of mine (we were in Iraq together amongst various other Ops) didn't get any help when he obviously needed some, he hung himself a few years ago, very sad. My wife say's I'm a changed man post Iraq and I should see someone but it's not for me and not something some tree hugging German counsellor could relate to.

Anyway, I'm fine . .. . . . . . .. . .. . .. . wibble, wibble :wub:

 

I don't think we could get more 'off topic' if we tried ;)

Its difficult to explain to a layman that has not, thankfully, been through this or experienced it, i have had similar comments from my wife too, i have also lost colleagues over the years and you are right, counselling most certainly is not for everyone, it may be me? but i just find them highly patronising.

 

I make no apology for going off topic either!! important subject that is wholly misunderstood, by some! ;);)

 

 

Phil.

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Anyway, your "Salon de the" sounds fantastic and obviously had the locals completely smitten. Well done you two for improving Anglo - French relationships. I always feel that I'm made so welcome by the French, no matter what age they are, they treat everyone with a formal respect. This is something you just don't see here. I don't mean now and then, I mean people here never show any courtesy to others. I often do the chivalrous thing to a look of surprise/horror/suspicion. Just shows how unused to it people are over here.

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If you're thinking about Spain Vanmaster I can recommend most of the big sites on the Costa Brava (depends what kind of site you're after though).

If you can go outside of the main holiday season it's much much cheaper and you'll have a better choice of pitches, all the 'best' spots on the site we're going to next year had already been booked in July this year. (Laguna, Castello d'Empuries)

Other sites open their 'booking site' at the end of October.

 

I don't know how old you are but L'Amfora seems popular with the older folk and Las Dunas & El Delfin Verde are great if you've got kids. Laguna, La Ballena Alegre & Cala GoGo are our favourites and suit all ages.

I'm in my 50's Borussia so no kids to worry about as the youngest has just turned 21. We tend to prefer smaller sites with local or on site restaurant/Bar. I don't speak a word of Spanish so I suppose that's half the fun is trying to communicate. We like to put some miles in doing the exploring thing but don't particularly like religious buildings/artefacts. (He said going to a hugely Roman Catholic country!) We like to soak up the real culture rather than follow the tourist trail insofar as if there's any sign of a kiss me quick hat, we'll move off a bit further into uncharted territory. Some of our best friends were met by joining in with the real locals and sharing good times together. We like to eat where the locals eat because it's usually the best food. These are the situations where you meet nice people who advise on things to do in the area too. So not very knowledgeable about Spain at all so any pointers well received. :D

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I should add I have all the school holidays off so no chance of out of season deals. That does, however give me two weeks at Easter and six weeks in the summer so I can't complain. I would expect the smaller sites to be in less demand and therefore still have vacancies. Best tell the wife we need to get cracking on booking some pitches.

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I should add I have all the school holidays off so no chance of out of season deals. That does, however give me two weeks at Easter and six weeks in the summer so I can't complain. I would expect the smaller sites to be in less demand and therefore still have vacancies. Best tell the wife we need to get cracking on booking some pitches.

Ahhhhh, that explains a lot!!

 

 

Phil.

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Anyway, your "Salon de the" sounds fantastic and obviously had the locals completely smitten. Well done you two for improving Anglo - French relationships. I always feel that I'm made so welcome by the French, no matter what age they are, they treat everyone with a formal respect. This is something you just don't see here. I don't mean now and then, I mean people here never show any courtesy to others. I often do the chivalrous thing to a look of surprise/horror/suspicion. Just shows how unused to it people are over here.

No argument regarding the French, mostly a lovely way of life, very accepting people and a lovely country. Although We have come across some who are inconsiderate, and rude etc.

 

But I do feel very sorry for you if that is the impression you get of your fellow countrymen. I for one DO find politeness, friendlyness, helpfulness, warmth and more wherever I go in the UK.

 

For me it's not a them and us. It's we.

 

 

John

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